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Book excerpt – Blue With Envy: My American Journey With Manchester City

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Kartik Krishnaiyer is a soccer writer who served as a ball boy for the Fort Lauderdale (Fla.) Strikers, where he saw such superstars as Franz Beckenbauer and Giorgio Chinaglia play. That started his love of the Beautiful Game, which would manifest itself most prominently with Manchester City.

In his book, “Blue With Envy: My American Journey With Manchester City,” recently published by World Soccer Talk, he uses Manchester City as an example to share his own personal story of how America’s fascination with English Premier League soccer has grown by leaps and bounds year after year.

The following excerpt is a glimpse into that world and can be purchased here.

PART I: You Saw Me Standing Alone

Chapter 1 – The Opening Whistle

May 13, 2012 is when many Americans finally fell in love with English football.  It was the day Sergio Aguero scored in the 94th minute for Manchester City against Queens Park Rangers at the Etihad Stadium. Aguero’s goal gave Manchester City (aka the Blues or Citizens) the club’s first top flight title in 44 years and may have been the very moment the Premier League broke through the clutter of “also-ran” sports in the United States. Certainly someone at NBC Sports was watching that day as they paid $250 million for the US media rights from 2013-16. The English Premier League had a three-year national TV deal and exposure to an estimated 80 million households as opposed to the 40 million in their previous deal with the now defunct FOX Soccer.

As Americans discover the pageantry and excitement of English football, more and more Yanks are developing connections to specific Premier League clubs. Many new fans are choosing Manchester City as a club to support, but it was not always that way.

I could begin discussing the trials and tribulations of being a Manchester City fan in the United States. Dealing with relegation from the Premier League on the same day Manchester United was awarded the Premier League trophy in 1996. Or when I had to struggle to find anybody showing the Division 2 playoff final versus Gillingham in 1999. Or even as recently as 2008, when American fans would refer to Manchester United as simply “Manchester” in my presence at soccer events.

But let’s start at the MLS All-Star game in 2006. Chelsea came to Bridgeview, Illinois to play a team of top stars from Major League Soccer.

World Cup 2006 had been a watershed moment for the growth of the sport in the United States. For the first time in memory, soccer was mainstream — there were ESPN shows dissecting every US performance and the television ratings showed a respectable growth in national interest. As someone who had grown up with the old North American Soccer League, even serving as a ball boy for the Fort Lauderdale Strikers, I had seen the high of the soccer boom of the late 1970s as well as the dark period between 1984 and 1996 when the US lacked a first division outdoor professional league.

Soccer as a big business and a mainstream sport in American culture was never taken seriously until the 2006 World Cup. After the World Cup success on TV, the earth began to move for soccer fans in the States. First, slowly, but then with a supersonic pace to reach the point where we sit approaching the 2014 World Cup.

I arrived in Chicago several days before the MLS All Star Game as I had a political project I was working on in town. A buzz was growing about the game as Chelsea fans from across the USA and from England arrived and painted the town blue. I could feel English football’s time was beginning to come Stateside. Though it was still a smallish niche, you could walk around Chicago that week and see Chelsea shirts practically around every corner.

The 2006 MLS All-Star game was covered like a mainstream sporting event in the United States. Coming off the World Cup high, and with the one and only Jose Mourinho giving incendiary quotes on American television about various things, the game was covered extensively. The game was built-up as a follow-up to the World Cup, Americans vs. Brits, despite the face that the stars of the “American” team were Canadian Dwayne De Rosario and Bolivian Jaime Moreno. Chelsea featured members of the English national team such as John Terry, Frank Lampard and Joe Cole but were a multi-ethnic team of stars from all over the globe. The MLS All-Stars won the match 1-0 on a piece of individual brilliance from De Rosario.

Following that game, the sport faded away from the major cable networks. Setanta Sports, GOL TV and FOX Soccer Channel, which literally nobody subscribed to, held the broadcast rights to the MLS and European leagues. The sport was back to obscurity, at least for the time being.

Chapter 2 – Soccer Roots

Watching American football, particularly the Miami Hurricanes and Miami Dolphins, was a part of growing up in south Florida. My father was a big Milwaukee Bucks fan, which led me to an interest in basketball. Despite the presence of those other sports in my life, it quickly became all soccer, all the time for me. It helped that my family resided in Coral Springs, which dubbed itself as the “Soccer Capital of Florida”.

Coral Springs was a planned community started by the Westinghouse Corporation and served as a thriving bedroom community for Fort Lauderdale and Miami. Unlike today, when Coral Springs is a city in its own right with a diverse population which is nearly 25% Hispanic and 15% Black (largely from the Caribbean), at the time it was a suburban, almost entirely Caucasian, town.

During my childhood, Coral Springs boasted the largest youth soccer league in the United States. Unlike much of rest of the country where football and baseball were the only youth sports that people seemed to care about, participating in soccer was a viable option.  In 1980s America, playing soccer usually meant you had liberal parents (especially those born abroad) but in Coral Springs, every kid played the sport at some point.

Another reason why I was driven towards soccer over other sports was that I had really poor hand-eye coordination. This limited my ability to play baseball, tennis or basketball in a competitive way. I was also not big enough to play American football.

Initially I didn’t care for soccer. In 1981 my parents started going to the Fort Lauderdale Strikers games more and I became hooked.  By 1982 I had become better at the sport. It seemed every kid in my school was registered for soccer. My growing interest in the game, which would otherwise have been considered an unusual obsession, was socially acceptable.

I developed a desire to somehow be involved with the Fort Lauderdale Strikers who were my heroes at the time. It didn’t hurt that the team were particularly aggressive in the local market during this era. They would do numerous community events, autograph sessions for kids and camps and clinics as well.

I don’t recall exactly how it happened but I ended up as a ball boy for the visit of Ipswich Town in 1982. At the time I did not know what a legend Sir Bobby Robson was or how big a club Ipswich were. To me, it just seemed like some club from England from a city I hadn’t heard of (unlike City’s visit the previous year because even at seven years of age, I knew Manchester was a big place), which made the game exotic and more interesting than anything the Dolphins might do in 1982.

Despite soccer being my major interest, I still liked American Football and followed the Dolphins. When the NFL Players Union announced they were striking, I cried and my parents had to console me. Thankfully, we still had the Strikers.

As the 1983 season approached, it was all Strikers, all the time for me. I was a regular ball-boy and was meeting members of the team. The two that left the biggest impression on me were ex-Manchester City player and future Manchester City Assistant Manager Brian Kidd and El Nene — Teófilo Cubillas, the greatest Peruvian player of all time. I even got to know Cubillas’ children, as they were my age.

The Strikers got off to a horrific start that season. The worst start in franchise history put the team in a must-win situation against the New York Cosmos on June 6th, 1983. The Strikers had not beaten the Cosmos since losing the 1980 Soccer Bowl to the team at RFK Stadium. I walked out as a ball boy and saw legends Franz Beckenbauer and Giorgio Chinaglia warming up. I got goose bumps. The Strikers won 2-0 but seeing those Cosmos players at field level and actually flipping a ball to Beckenbauer for a throw-in are still a major highlight of my life.

A few weeks later Manchester City came to the United States to take part in the Pan Am Sunshine International Series, a “tournament” that featured the Blues taking on the Tampa Bay Rowdies and Fort Lauderdale Strikers. Two years after being in the FA Cup Final, City had been relegated from the First Division on the final day of the season. They came to the United States a fallen side, previously one of the great teams of the late 1960s and early 1970s, but now fully feeling the impact of Peter Swales’ mismanagement of the club. The Blues had faced off previously with the New York Cosmos, and the Strikers had made it to (Greater) Manchester to visit Stockport in 1978 on an English tour, which also saw the Strikers face off with Stoke City and Port Vale.

Once again I was selected as a ball-boy. I recall vividly the pregame exchange of gifts between Strikers General Manager Tim Robbie (whom I would work with in the future) and Manchester City Captain Paul Power. At the time I wasn’t familiar with the ceremonies around international matches as the NASL had thoroughly Americanized the pre-game by playing music and allowing players to run out of a tunnel with smoke rather than the dignified walk-out we see elsewhere.

The game itself was engrossing. Manchester City won 4-2 and claimed the second and final Sunshine International Series.  I was stunned to see the Strikers undone by a team just relegated in England. The Strikers had been a top team in the NASL but, reflecting on it now, the standard of the league was slipping badly. In the late 1970s the NASL had as many recognizable world superstars, if not more than, any other domestic league on the planet. By 1983, it was simply a league in its dying days with mostly washed up talent.

The match left an indelible impression about Manchester City with me. I liked the blue kits and the open, attacking style of play the team showed. I didn’t realize at the time that John Benson had replaced John Bond mid-season and he would be done managing City after the American tour ended.

City were an underdog team. I had heard of Manchester United and Liverpool and learned that the Blues were rivals to both, though in retrospect the rivalry with Liverpool was overplayed. I liked the idea of supporting an underdog, because beyond the local teams, I almost always supported the underdogs in American sport.

After the season with outdoor soccer was on the wane in the country, the Strikers relocated to Minnesota where they could compete in the indoor league as well. Manchester City stayed in my mind, but I focused on local soccer again. Fort Lauderdale launched a team in the second division United Soccer League (USL- not to be confused with the current USL PRO league). The Fort Lauderdale Sun, featuring former Manchester City and Scottish midfielder Asa Hartford, won the USL title in that inaugural season.

The year 1985 brought a second season of USL soccer but also tragedy. We had heard about the terrible fire at Bradford City and worried if something similar could happen at Lockhart Stadium, which had wooden bleachers behind each goal at the time.  Our worries were soon allayed but not in a way we would have wished for. The USL suspended operations midway through the schedule.  It was a sad ending to a great chapter in my life, one that cemented me permanently to the sport.

Chapter 3 – World In Motion

The summer of 1989 was the first time I saw an English club play since the demise of the NASL and the American tours of Manchester City, Ipswich Town and others. On August 6, 1989 there was a friendly at Joe Robbie Stadium in Miami between Independiente and Arsenal, which was broadcast back to the UK on ITV. The game, won by the reigning English Champions 2-1, wasn’t well attended partly because English football had wrongly gotten a horrible reputation in the United States due to the tragic events at Heysel, Bradford City, and Hillsborough. This reputation kept fans away from the game, even many from the local soccer community. There were just over 10,000 in attendance but it felt empty in a stadium that decades later accommodated as many as 70,000 for a 2011 exhibition match between FC Barcelona and C.D. Guadalajara.

When I visited England during the summer of 1990, my connection to Manchester City really took root. This was despite an active lobbying effort from some of my family members to back Crystal Palace, who had just completed a remarkable FA Cup run. I watched the 1990 World Cup in England and India (via a BBC feed) and had my eyes opened. I realized that for the game to evolve in the States, it had to be broadcast properly without commercials and constant references to American sports.

Being Indian-American, there was always a natural connection to England. As a child, my family’s summer trips to India almost always featured a stop in London where, like so many Indian families, we had relatives. At the time, England was a heavily socialized country thanks to the Labour governments of Clement Atlee and Harold Wilson. The place just felt different than the United States despite the common language. The second you landed at Heathrow, you knew you were someplace very different. I contrasted it with Frankfurt, the other airport and city we’d have to transfer at, which seemed as if it was merely an overseas department of the United States.

Interested in reading more? “Blue With Envy: My American Journey With Manchester City” can be purchased here.

MLS Snapshot: Portland Timbers 1-2 LA Galaxy (video)

CARSON, CA - MARCH 06:  Robbie Keane #7 of Los Angeles Galaxy celebrates after scoring on a penalty kick in the second half of their MLS match against D.C. United at StubHub Center on March 6, 2016 in Carson, California. The Galaxy defeated United 4-1.  (Photo by Victor Decolongon/Getty Images)
Photo by Victor Decolongon/Getty Images
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The game in 100 words (or less): The LA Galaxy are firing on all cylinders these days, having extended their winning streak to four games (six games unbeaten) with a 2-1 victory over the defending MLS Cup champion Portland Timbers at Providence Park on Saturday. The win sees Bruce Arena’s side move to within two and five points of the Western Conference and Supporters’ Shield-leading Colorado Rapids and FC Dallas, respectively (the two sides face one another later on Saturday), while the Timbers miss out on their chance to jump two places, up to fourth, in the West. Back to Saturday’s game, Robbie Keane bagged the 80th goal of his time in MLS (to go with 44 assists, bringing the Irishman’s impressive statline up to 124 goals and assists combined in 118 appearances), but it was Gyasi Zardes who scored the winner, just four minutes after Keane’s opener, in the 11th minute. As I’ve opined the last two weeks, the Galaxy are peaking at the right time of year, and the rest of the league should be terrified.

[ MORE: Previewing the rest of the MLS weekend ]

Three moments that mattered

7′ — Keane taps home at the far post — Keane won’t score many goals easier than this one. Giovani dos Santos teed him up, and fortunately for Keane, Nat Borchers dropped his controller as GdS hit his cross.

11′ — Zardes heads home after another defensive breakdown — Zardes has real striker’s instincts. Let’s let him put those to good use, like he did in making the late run to the back post for the Galaxy’s second goal.

41′ — Valentin rolls one past Rowe for 2-1 — The finish from Valentin is nice, but how about Darlington Nagbe with the skill and the vision inside the penalty area to created the space, time and chance?

[ FOLLOW: All of PST’s MLS coverageStandings | Stats | Schedule ]

Man of the match: Robbie Keane

Goalscorers: Keane (7′), Zardes (11′), Valentin (41′)

Preseason roundup: 10 Premier League clubs in action Saturday

GLASGOW, SCOTLAND - JULY 23:  Wes Morgan captain of Leicester City holds the International Champions Cup during the Pre Seanon Friendly match between Cetlic and Leicester City at Celtic Park Stadium on July 23, 2016 in Glasgow, Scotland. (Photo by Ian MacNicol/Getty Images)
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A roundup of Saturday’s preseason friendlies involving Premier League clubs…

Celtic 1-1 Leicester City

Stop me if you’ve heard this one before: Leicester City winger (and 2015-16 PFA Player of the Year) Riyad Mahrez opened the scoring with a sensational, curling goal guided inside the far post by his magical left foot (WATCH HERE). The Foxes conceded an equalizer just before the hour mark (Eoghan O’Connell), but Claudio Ranieri‘s side still has a number of key players to welcome back into the starting lineup ahead of the opening day for the 2016-17 Premier League season, which is just three weeks from today.

PEC Zwolle 0-4 Southampton

Southampton continued their preseason preparations, under the direction of new manager Claude Puel, with a 4-0 victory over Eredivisie side Zwolle. Nathan Redmond, who arrived from Norwich City in the summer, scored twice on the day (second goal below), while Charlie Austin and Pierre-Emile Hojbjerg bagged a goal each.

Portsmouth 3-3 Bournemouth

Bournemouth managed a 3-3 draw with fellow South Coast side Portsmouth, with Lewis Grabban, Jordan Ibe (fresh off signing from Liverpool) and Dan Gosling scoring for the Premier League side.

Barnsley 0-3 Everton

Ross Barkley scored twice and Kevin Mirallas netted the other goal, as Everton, under new boss Ronald Koeman, brushed aside Championship side Barnsley

Elsewhere in preseason action

Bradford City 1-4 Burnley
Rotheram 1-2 Sunderland
Preston North End 1-1 Stoke City
Scunthorpe United 0-2 Hull City
Watford 0-0 Anzhi Makhachkala
PSV Eindhoven vs. West Bromwich Albion — canceled

WATCH: Leicester’s Mahrez picks up where he left off with splendid goal

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Don’t stab at the ball!

It’s a cry that echoes from youth matches to the upper reaches of the game, but Riyad Mahrez has a tendency to force defenders into forgetting fundamentals.

[ MORE: Sunderland hires Moyes ]

The Leicester man, linked to Arsenal, danced through the Celtic defense in Saturday’s International Champions Cup action to whip a shot home and give the Foxes a 1-0 lead in Glasgow (The Bhoys have since tied it up).

We’ve seen this so many times from the Algerian, who hopefully sticks around Leicester for the club’s UEFA Champions League run and Premier League title defense.

What does Sunderland managerial change mean for USMNT’s, Spurs’ Yedlin?

SUNDERLAND, ENGLAND - MAY 11: DeAndre Yedlin and Patrick van Aanholt of Sunderland celebrate staying in the Premier League after the Barclays Premier League match between Sunderland and Everton at the Stadium of Light on May 11, 2016 in Sunderland, England.  (Photo by Ian MacNicol/Getty Images)
Photo by Ian MacNicol/Getty Images
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DeAndre Yedlin left the United States for England in January 2015, the latest step in a career trajectory simply described as “Up”.

Yedlin, now 23, acclimated to life in the Premier League before making a late season appearance with Tottenham to close the 2014-15 season.

[ MORE: Sunderland hires Moyes ]

The next year saw him force into Sam Allardyce‘s Sunderland lineup, transforming his defensive acumen in a way that few USMTN fans could deny during this summer’s Copa America Centenario (That pesky red card aside).

But not only is Tottenham in the UEFA Champions League, but Yedlin’s manager at Sunderland is gone. What does this mean for Yedlin? Let’s consider three primary options:

Sunderland still buys him — New manager David Moyes loves him a mobile fullback with offensive capabilities. Not that Yedlin is Leighton Baines, but a starting right back slot in the Premier League could still be in the cards.

Tottenham keeps him around — Mauricio Pochettino likes to rotate his defenders and will have a heavy schedule on his plate. Kieran Trippier was unable to unseat Kyle Walker last season, so the No. 2 chair could be open for Yedlin (although Trippier showed he’s on the level while at Burnley, leading the league in crosses during 2014-15).

Tottenham loans him out — Speedy right backs will be in demand at several spots, and Sunderland is just one destination where fans are clamoring for reinforcements. Lack of purchases is one big reason Steve Bruce just left Hull City, and clubs like that will be aiming for relatively proven players on loan.