ProSoccerTalk’s MLS Team of the Week – Week 2

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Forwards

Jermain Defoe, Toronto FC – The Tottenham import put the Reds’ opener on ice early with two goals in his first 23 Major League Soccer minutes, displaying the type of finishing that makes him the league’s highest paid player.

We could be wrong about: Joao Plata, Real Salt Lake; Obafemi Martins, Seattle Sounders; Giles Barnes, Houston Dynamo.

Midfielders

Shea Salinas, San Jose Earthquakes – Particularly after San Jose introduced a third forward early in the second half, everything want through the Earthquakes’ winger in their 3-3 draw with Real Salt Lake. Salinas had a strong case for Player of the Week.

Maurice Edu, Philadelphia Union – A second straight staring performance from the Stoke City refugee. Without Brian Carroll’s help (out, illness), Edu continued to provide the anchor in the middle, accumulating six tackles and four interceptions as Philadelphia dominated New England. If there was a Best XI after two weeks, he’d be in it.

Kyle Beckerman, Real Salt Lake – A strong start to the U.S. international’s 2014 was accentuated with a great, left-footed, 26-yard goal in Santa Clara. His team gave up three goals, but they all had to go over and around RSL’s captain.

Leonardo Fernandes, Philadelphia Union – A number of the honorable mentions have a claim to this spot, but playing his part in Philadelphia’s midfield dominance, Fernandes and his first half assist give him the edge on the field. In his first Major League Soccer start, the Brazilian completed 88 percent of his Saturday passes.

Mauro Rosales, Chivas USA – Rosales was the inspiration behind the Goats’ Sunday showing, one which nearly saw a 10-man team take full points from visiting Vancouver. Though they conceded late, Rosales’s effort, skill on set pieces, and open play creativity kept his team in the game, particularly in the moments after Agustín Pelletieri’s early dismissal.

We might be wrong about: Minda, Chivas USA; Jeff Larentowicz, Chicago Fire; Jonathan Osario, Toronto FC; Michael Bradley, Toronto FC; Luke Mulholland, Real Salt Lake, Boniek Garcia, Houston Dynamo

Defenders

Tony Lochhead, Chivas USA – Other Chivas USA defenders were strong this weekend, but among the league’s left backs, the New Zealand international rose to the top of the list. Like the rest of his teammates, Lochhead’s performance was crucial to overcoming Pelletieri’s 13th minute red card.

Aurélien Collin, Sporting Kansas City – FC Dallas couldn’t get much going on Saturday, partly because their rare forays into their attacking half were often met with Collin and Matt Besler preserving Sporting’s possession. In the 81st minute, Collin distinguished himself from his partner in central defense by heading Kansas City in front.

Víctor Bernárdez, San Jose Earthquakes – Our Player of the Week had an up-and-down performance but delivered when it mattered most, scoring in the 75th and 95th minutes as San Jose salvaged a 3-3 draw.

Kofie Sarkodie, Houston Dynamo – For the second straight week, both Dynamo fullbacks put in noteworthy performances, but just as Collin’s goal distinguished him from Besler, Sarkodie’s second half clearance off the Houston line gave him the edge on Corey Ashe. BBVA Compass is the home to MLS’s best fullback tandem.

We might be wrong about: Corey Ashe, Houston Dynamo; Doniel Henry, Toronto FC; Carlos Bocanegra, Chivas USA; Marvell Wynne, Colorado Rapids; Raymon Gaddis, Philadelphia Union

Goalkeeper

Zac MacMath, Philadelphia Union – Though we went gaga over Nick Rimando’s stop at Buck Shaw, MacMath’s save on Diego Fagundez in Saturday’s first half was equally impressive. Instead of giving up three goals in a draw, though, MacMath had three saves in a shutout win. No doubt, the Revolution made his day an easy one, but MacMath also prevented what was close to a sure-fire goal. He’s the third Union player in our team this week.

We might be wrong about: Tally Hall, Houston Dynamo

Arsene Wenger to leave Arsenal

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After almost 22 years in charge, Arsene Wenger has called time on his Arsenal reign.

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Wenger, 68, announced on Friday that he will be leaving the Gunners at the end of the current 2017/18 campaign despite having one year remaining on his contract.

Here is the statement from Wenger in full which was posted on Arsenal’s website with the heading “Merci Arsene” taking center stage.

“After careful consideration and following discussions with the club, I feel it is the right time for me to step down at the end of the season,” Wenger said. “I am grateful for having had the privilege to serve the club for so many memorable years. I managed the club with full commitment and integrity. I want to thank the staff, the players, the Directors and the fans who make this club so special. I urge our fans to stand behind the team to finish on a high. To all the Arsenal lovers take care of the values of the club. My love and support for ever.”

The Frenchman is a man who revolutionized the Premier League when he arrived in 1996 and he will be remembered as a bastion of attractive, possession based soccer as his Arsenal team of the 2003/04 season, dubbed the “Invincibles,” will always be remembered for going through an entire PL season unbeaten en route to winning the title.

Wenger has won three Premier League titles, seven FA Cups and seven community shield trophies during his time in charge of Arsenal, as well as leading them to 20-straight seasons finishing in the top four of the Premier League and 19 qualifying for the UEFA Champions League.

That run ended last season as they finished in fifth and in the past few seasons there have been fan protests with “Wenger Out” or “Wenger In” dividing the fanbase.

However, Wenger’s tenure can end on a high in the Europa League as Arsenal face Atletico Madrid in the semifinals and he is essentially three wins away from returning Arsenal to the Champions League.

Wenger has so far managed Arsenal for 1,228 games with 704 wins in all competitions. His final game in charge will be the Europa League final in Lyon, if Arsenal get there. But his final Premier League game in charge of Arsenal will be away at Huddersfield Town on May 13.

The focus will now switch to who will take over from Wenger this summer with the likes of Diego Simeone, Carlo Ancelotti, Brendan Rodgers and Thomas Tuchel all linked with the job.

But in the more immediate future the final few weeks of the 2017/18 campaign in England will turn into an appreciation of Wenger and all he has achieved over the last two decades in charge of Arsenal.

Reaction to Wenger’s departure from Arsenal

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Arsenal dropped a bombshell this morning as it announced manager Arden’s Wenger would step down at the end of the season.

[MORE: Arsene Wenger to leave Arsenal]

This immediately sent shockwaves across the globe, and it’s been getting plenty of reaction, right from Arsenal’s Home in London to all points east, west, north and south.

Heres a look at some of the reaction to Wenger’s decision.

(more…)

Is now the right time for Wenger to leave?

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Usually in this kind of situation the first question many ask is “why now?”

But almost unanimously the response when Arsene Wenger announced Friday that he will be leaving Arsenal at the end of the season was simply: “The time is now.”

[ MORE: Who will take over from Wenger?

Wenger, 68, has spent almost 22 years not only leading Arsenal to 10 major trophies but also reshaping the way English soccer developed. The Frenchman arrived in the Premier League in 1996 and revolutionized the game with his methods on and off the pitch as he created some of the greatest teams the PL, and the game, has ever seen with the “Invincibles” and all of the fantastic players who arrived in his first 10 years in charge.

But now feels like the right time for Wenger to move on. It is fitting that the end of an era will be as classy as the man himself. I’ve been lucky enough to talk to him and ask him questions over the years and he is someone who loves the game dearly and speaks with passion and intellect about so many things.

But, above all else, he loves Arsenal.

After leading Arsenal to 20-straight seasons in the top four and 19 in the UEFA Champions League, that run ended last season and the Gunners have now had their two worst seasons under Wenger back-to-back. They have regressed and even Wenger, a man who transformed Arsenal into a team admired around the world for their attacking play, knew his time was up.

With Wenger announcing his decision to step down with one year left on his current contract, it shows that he realizes fresh impetus is needed and the job of rebuilding Arsenal is not for him to lead.

Following two years of “Wenger Out” and empty seats starting to appear at the Emirates Stadium on a regular basis, this was what had to happen for Arsenal to move on from a legendary figure who kept winning FA Cups in recent seasons (three in the last five campaigns) to keep his success ticking over.

Wenger was totally committed to the club and put his own success to one side to help Arsenal negotiate the move from Highbury to the new stadium as players were sold and he turned down some of Europe’s biggest clubs. As he said in his statement, Arsenal will have Wenger’s “love and support forever” and he should have the stadium named after him and a statue in his honor.

He will now get the sendoff he deserves in the next few weeks as English soccer pays its respects to Wenger in the final five games of the Premier League campaign before it all ends on the final day of the season at Huddersfield Town on May 13.

Hanging over all of this is the chance for Wenger to ride off into the sunset and put Arsenal back in the Champions League for next season.

With a UEFA Europa League semifinal first leg against Atletico Madrid coming up next week and the return leg on May 3, Wenger has the chance to reach a major final in Lyon on May 16 to see out his incredible time at Arsenal.

But then what?

There is talk that Wenger may remain at Arsenal in a different role and go upstairs and help the directors — he is particularly close with majority owner Stan Kroenke — but in the past he has shared his belief that he could well manage elsewhere when he left the Gunners.

The French national team? Paris Saint-Germain? Both seem like sensible options for Wenger, with perhaps the former the best fit for him. If a talented crop of players don’t deliver for Didier Deschamps this summer at the World Cup, you’d think that French Football Federation may make a managerial change.

Wenger’s legacy will be intact at Arsenal no matter what he does in the future and no matter what happens in the final weeks of this season. The sight of him struggling with a zipper on the sidelines, berating an official or smiling as he applauds another fine team goal are almost over.

The time was now for him to move on. And Wenger now leaves Arsenal in a much better place than when he took over almost 22 years ago as the Gunners will aim to get back into the top four and the Premier League title conversation with a new man at the helm.

Arsene Wenger and Arsenal will always be inextricably intertwined but he has made the right call at the right time. His class remains.

Merci, Arsene.

Who are the favorites to take over at Arsenal?

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With Arsene Wenger announcing he will leave Arsenal at the end of the current season, the immediate focus switches to who will take charge of the Gunners beyond this season after almost 22 years of Wenger.

The bookmakers are having a field day slashing the odds of several managers previously linked with the job with nobody really knowing what direction Arsenal’s board will go with their next appointment.

Will they appoint an experienced manager? Or will it be a young coach with a fresh outlook a la Wenger back in 1996?

Here’s a look at the main contenders, according to Oddschecker.


Patrick Vieira (4/1) – Wenger spoke on Thursday about how Vieira has the potential to manage Arsenal but did mention now may be too early. The NYCFC manager has done a fine job in MLS but will Arsenal really hand the reins to their former captain and midfield general? Vieira’s appointment would be welcomed by fans who idolized him but maybe he is the man who should follow the man who replaces Wenger. That said, he is the early favorite to take charge of Arsenal.

Thomas Tuchel (5/1) – Out of work for 12 months, it was heavily reported that Tuchel had agreed to take charge of Arsenal a few months ago. The German coach did well at Borussia Dortmund as they won the German Cup and got the latter stages of the Champions League and he is known for giving youngsters a chance to shine. This would make a lot of sense given Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang and Henrikh Mkhitaryan, his former players at Dortmund, arriving at Arsenal in January and the likes of Mesut Ozil around.

Joachim Loew (7/1) – Although the German national team manager has a contract through the 2020 European Championships, later this summer, after the 2018 World Cup, could be the time when Loew steps down from the German national team. He has built a World Cup-winning squad and may feel like he has done everything he can with Die Mannschaft. Loew hasn’t had experience of coaching a club on a day-to-day basis and that may be something which will concern Arsenal’s board.

Brendan Rodgers (7/1) – The odds have been slashed on Celtic’s manager taking charge of Arsenal. The former Liverpool manager (who came so close to winning the Premier League title in 2013/14) has certainly rebuilt his reputation at Celtic and we all know that Rodgers loves to play an attacking style. That fits in seamlessly with what Wenger has built at Arsenal, but would Rodgers’ appointment excite the Arsenal fans? Probably not. Also, with Rodgers known for his teams struggling defensively, there’s a sense that he will just be another Wenger and little progress will be made.

Massimiliano Allegri (10/1) – The Juventus manager is being linked with Chelsea and Arsenal this summer and it is easy to understand why. Allegri has led Juve to three-straight Italian doubles with a solid defensive approach, something Arsenal need more emphasis on if they’re going to make it back to the top four. Allegri has also reached the UEFA Champions League final in two of the three seasons. Seems like it would be a good appointment to improve Arsenal’s defensive unit and play.

Carlo Ancelotti (10/1) – The veteran Italian manager has won everything and he has won it everywhere but he usually takes over established teams with stars delivering. That’s not the case at Arsenal right now. Ancelotti has delivered success at AC Milan, PSG, Real Madrid and Bayern Munich, but he will have to be trusted with a lot of cash to rebuild this Arsenal squad. The former Chelsea manager certainly knows the Premier League well after winning the title and the FA Cup in 2010, so there are no problems there.