shea salinas

San Jose’s near miss in Toluca still a setback for Major League Soccer


After six rounds of penalty kicks, Major League Soccer’s luck in Mexico hadn’t changed, but after Shea Salinas’s shootout try nailed Alfredo Talavera’s woodwork, San Jose had come closer than most. Succumbing in extra kicks after a 2-2 (agg.) draw, the Earthquakes bowed out of CONCACAF Champions League, but only after a 5-4 shootout sent Liga MX’s Toluca into the tournament’s final four.

It was the closet an MLS team has ever come to eliminating a Mexican side south of the border in this competition, a result few would have fathomed when San Jose’s starting XI was announced. There was no Chris Wondolowski, started on the bench with a slight hamstring problem. Alan Gordon also was kept out of the XI, though he would join the captain on the field by full-time. But Víctor Bernández was suspended, while fellow starting defender Clarence Goodson is still struggling with injury. When the team kicked off at the Estadio Nemesio Díez, rookie J.J. Koval joined Ty Harden in center defense, with Billy Schuler and Khari Stephenson also starting under do-or-die circumstances.

Perhaps that’s why Watson tried to shorten the game. In the first half, San Jose left Steven Lenhart alone up top, dropped nine into their defensive third, and tried to get to halftime without scoring a goal. Forty-five minutes later, the score was still 1-1, and while Toluca still held the away goals edge, its willingness to sit on that lead played into San Jose’s hands.

Eleven minutes after half-time, Watson’s plan came good. On a set piece from just inside Toluca’s half, Salinas (pictured) lofted a ball toward the middle of Talavera’s area. There Harden beat midfielder Wilson Thiago to finish inside the right post, giving San Jose a 2-1 lead and eliminating Toluca’s away goals edge. Though fitness and history were against them, the Earthquakes had gone in front.

The lead only lasted 13 minutes, though, before a blast from outside the area from Isaac Brizuela made it 2-2. Collecting the ball after a cleared set piece, Brizuela hit a 20-yard shot through the penalty box’s traffic and into the left side of Jon Busch’s goal, giving the San Jose keeper little chance to stop the score that took the team to penalty kicks.

Before the 120th minute, however, both teams had chances to avoid the shootout. Alan Gordon was controversially ruled offside on a ball that ended up in Talavera’s net, while San Cronin and Busch were both called on to make big saves to keep the Earthquakes alive.

In the shootout, each teams failed to covert its initial kick before making the next four, sending Thiago to the spot with the first sudden death try. Diving to his left, Busch nearly made his second save for the shootout, though the ball’s momentum eventually saw it bounce in front of the line but go under the crossbar.

Salinas, however, wasn’t as fortunate. Though Talavera guessed left, Salinas went right, only to put his try off the cross bar. After playing to a draw over 180 minutes, Toluca and San Jose were separated by only the width of a bar. The Red Devils move on. San Jose goes home.

Particularly given their shortcomings, the Earthquakes gave an effort they can be proud of, but looking at the result from the larger, league perspective, it adds to the list of disappointments Major League Soccer has endured at Mexico’s boots. Though San Jose came closer to advancing than any team that’s faced Liga opposition in Mexico in a knockout round, it ultimately came up short. As MLS pushes for greater significant, Mexico continues to hold it as arm’s length in CCL.

Are moral victories enough? Not for a league whose commissioner has tasked it with being the region’s best. Though the second half was exciting and San Jose’s effort, tactics, and results can be commended, the result was another setback for Major League Soccer, if only a small one.

Jurgen Klopp announced as new Liverpool manager

Jurgen Klopp, Liverpool FC
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Enough with the speculation and reports already, because it’s finally officially official: Jurgen Klopp has been appointed the newest manager of Liverpool Football Club, the Merseyside club announced on Thursday.

[ FOLLOW: All of PST’s PL coverage ]

Klopp will be unveiled to the world at an introductory press conference at Anfield on Friday.

According to early reports, Klopp’s three-year contract could pay him as much as $10 million per season.

[ QUOTE KING: Top 10 “Klopp-isms” from his time at Dortmund ]

The 48-year-old German has been out of work since stepping down at Bundesliga side Borussia Dortmund following a seventh-place finish to the 2014-15 season. Klopp’s seven seasons in charge of Dortmund weren’t without success and silverware, though, as he led Der BVB to back-to-back league titles in 2011 and 2012, a German Cup triumph in 2012 and a UEFA Champions League final appearance in 2013.

PST’s Joe Prince-Wright will be at Anfield on Friday for Klopp’s unveiling, so be sure to follow JPW on Twitter and check back to PST for wall-to-wall coverage of Klopp’s first press conference as Liverpool manager.

Mourinho “working like never before” to turn Chelsea around

Jose Mourinho, Chelsea FC
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Jose Mourinho got the dreaded much-needed vote of confidence from Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich last weekend, seemingly giving the Portuguese manager a temporary stay of execution despite the Blues’ worst start to a season in 37 years.

[ FOLLOW: All of PST’s PL coverage ]

Speaking this week, Mourinho has revealed that while he’s thankful to have been kept on at the club for which he regularly professes his love, he still thinks it was no-brainer for Abramovich. In other words, Mourinho’s not backing down from his incredible, seven-minute rant to one question following Saturday’s defeat to Southampton.

Mourinho, on what he’s doing to turn Chelsea around — quotes from the Guardian:

“It shows the confidence of Abramovich in the manager who has won three Premier League titles with this club. I thank him and I keep working.

“What’s going on? I do not know. The results with Chelsea at the moment have been really bad. I cannot hide that reality, and I don’t want to. And I struggle to find an explanation. But I assure you: I’m working like never before and we will come out of this. And there is also the Champions League that we will not neglect, for certain.”

What did you expect from Mourinho? Well, you know, I should probably be fired, but thanks to Mr. Abramovich for not realizing this and keeping me employed? It’s simultaneously interesting and the least surprising thing ever, though, that Mourinho claims to not know what’s wrong with Chelsea at the moment. Of course he has a theory (or five), and of course he’s “working like never before” to correct it.

[ MORE: Ozil, Coquelin say Arsenal can win the title this season ]

The most fascinating thing about Chelsea’s sluggish start to the season is to see, hear and read Mourinho speaking from a position of powerlessness. Always the clever one, the one dictating where the discussion goes, the one in charge of every press interaction, Saturday’s rant felt like watching a desperate Mourinho grasping for anything by which to pull himself back up.