Rating the Premier League bosses: How did your manager grade out?

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The manager’s chair is always one of the hottest seats in a Premier League venue, but this year’s bosses seemed more flammable than ever before. From Jose Mourinho to Malky Mackay to three bosses at Fulham, 2013/14 was a season for the bosses.

So how did yours do? Let’s take a look.

Arsenal – Arsene Wenger
Wenger’s tumble in the train station symbolically illustrated Arsenal’s season: It seemed like the Gunners were headed for title town only to be forced to hold onto the fourth Champions League spot for dear life. To be fair to Wenger, the club faced big injuries to some key players including missing a half-season’s worth of Theo Walcott. Still, the inability to bring a forward in during the transfer window, opting instead for a last-second swoop for injured Swedish midfielder Kim Kallstrom, gives the slender Frenchman a poorer grade than the No. 4 slot would hint.
Grade: C-

Aston Villa – Paul Lambert
A 15th place finish for Villa should almost never be acceptable; This is not a club in which survival is the only goal. Lambert didn’t seem to press the right buttons and even had his assistants stripped from him at the end of the year. At many times during the season, the attack seemed to center on “Let’s hope Christian Benteke scores,” and the team hemorrhaged goals late in the season. Throw in his criticism of the cups, and it wasn’t a good year for PL or AV.
Grade: D

Cardiff City – Malky Mackay, Ole Gunnar Solskjaer
Criticize unorthodox owner Vincent Tan as much as you’d like, but Mackay did not succeed despite some decent spending in August. Plus half the battle is getting along with your owner, not getting a solid month of the season hamstrung in ornery shouting matches. Mackay did well to get the team up, for sure, and will likely do better with a fresh start somewhere. Solskjaer was allowed to spend, too, but his infusion of Manchester United castaways and Norwegian talent didn’t do the trick. They went down. No one wins.
Grades: Mackay, D; Solskjaer, F

Chelsea – Jose Mourinho
The Special One had a good first year at Chelsea, although not up to his lofty expectations. He made clear the team’s problems (Have you heard they need a striker?) but also made some classy buys in Nemanja Matic amongst others. There were times his verbal games seemed to backfire, like in the case of his, “Well now we won’t win the league” with plenty of time remaining. But still he reached second place and the final four of the Champions League. Next year, it’s hardware or bust.
Grade: B+

source: APCrystal Palace – Ian Holloway, Tony Pulis
Credit to Holloway for getting Palace to the Premier League, but he struggled in the first throes of the season. The Pulis hire was a brilliant one, as the Eagles defended in elite fashion and pulled a number of surprising results out of the sky. And, of course, if all Crystal Palace’s season served was the “Pulis laugh” after a 3-3 draw against Liverpool, then this year was a success.
Grade: Holloway, D; Pulis, A

Everton – Roberto Martinez
He walked into a club that had traditionally failed to push to the next level… and took them to the Europa League. Martinez’s style may not have achieved PL success at Wigan, but he worked wonders with youngsters like Ross Barkley as well as veterans across the board. Martinez guided Tim Howard to a career-best in clean sheets, and Everton nearly made the Champions League. That’ll be the measuring stick for next season.
Grade: A-

Fulham – Martin Jol, Rene Meulensteen, Felix Magath
What a mess. Jol never seemed to have the answer, and Meulensteen’s first time in a Premier League first chair could was not a success. Magath did a number of good things that make you wonder what would’ve happened if he was appointed when Jol was fired or if the plug could’ve been pulled on Meulensteen a couple weeks earlier. In any event, their records reveal more about the on-field talent then the sideline sorcery.

Martin Jol: 3W-1D-9L
Rene Meulensteen: 3W-1D-9L
Felix Magath: 3W-2D-6L

Grades: Jol, F; Meulensteen, D; Magath, C

Hull City – Steve Bruce
A slow start for the Tigers was complicated by ownership’s public desire to change the team name to Hull Tigers, but credit Bruce for steadying the ship. The big man also made a couple solid mid-season signings in forwards Shane Long and Nikica Jelavic, and got the club into the Europa League with a run to FA Cup Final. This grade could be higher if they trump Arsenal for silverware.
Grade: B+

Liverpool – Brendan Rodgers
Last year, with his club on a reality show, everyone wanted to pip Rodgers as out of his depth. Yet here came the man with 33:1 odds to win the title, and he came to within a Steven Gerrard slip of getting the job done. You can’t blame the man for allowing a veteran to fall down. Rodgers will have to find better defending and hold onto Luis Suarez to be a true threat next year, but he also has the Champions League with which to lure players. Unquestionably, the man navigated an emotional season with a deft touch.
Grade: A-

Manchester City – Manuel Pellegrini
Talk about his board room riches? Sure, but Pellegrini lowered his public persona and worked his way through some tricky injuries and trickier road struggles. Though you could argue that City underachieved given its talents, Pellegrini pushed the right buttons and massaged egos well on the way to a title.
Grade: A

Manchester United – David Moyes, Ryan Giggs
The Moyes era was a disaster, but was Moyes himself? You could certainly argue he needed a PR-savvy team to help him talk and negotiate transfer fees, as his ludicrous offer for Leighton Baines and Marouane Fellaini set the table for a rough season. He also never seemed to sound the right note after losses. Manchester United is not considered a normal club by anyone, but Moyes often sounded as if “losses happen.” They do, but Manchester United fans don’t accept that. Giggs was a place-holder  who did his job of not being Moyes and being Giggs pretty well.
Grades: Moyes, D; Giggs, B+

source: APNewcastle United – Alan Pardew, John Carver
We have to include former TFC boss Carver because Pardew went and got himself suspended for headbutting an opponent during a game. Read that and guess what grade is coming. What makes it most screwy is that the club chief scout Graham Carr and Pardew assembled was talented enough to flirt with Europe for most of the early season. Then, Yohan Cabaye was allowed to leave for Paris Saint-Germain and Pardew had no answers. Not one, unless you count headbutting an opponent during a game. Carver was essentially Pardew Jr. for the suspension, and the club was simply the worst outside of Norwich over the final weeks, even months of the season. See this Tweet for more:

Grades: Pardew, D; Carver, F

Norwich City – Chris Hughton, Neil Adams
It wasn’t much better for former Newcastle boss Hughton, whose club was pegged for big things after offseason signings Gary Hooper and Ricky Van Wolfswinkel. The club just wasn’t humming all year. By the time Adams took over, it almost felt like the philosophy was, “Well, let’s see if Neil can pull off a miracle and at least he’ll get to say he was a PL boss if he doesn’t.”
Grades: Hughton, F; Adams, D

Southampton – Mauricio Pochettino
Really it could’ve gone so much worse for the Saints, with a midseason boardroom kerfuffle to go with constant rumors of nearly every player getting a big name transfer. Pochettino to me is the guy who should be getting looks from Manchester United and Tottenham Hotspur. A brilliant tactician who knows his way around the motivational circles as well, he’s about as good as it gets.
Grade: A

Stoke City – Mark Hughes
It didn’t start well, but boy did Hughes pull it together! Stoke leapt into the No. 9 slot in the table on the season’s final day, and Hughes did it with a variety of tactics. He’s earned plenty of guff for failures at other stops, but if the Britannia Stadium club backs him with a difference maker or two… well, perhaps the Potters can make the next step.
Grade: B

Sunderland – Paolo di Canio, Gus Poyet
This isn’t the first time di Canio’s honeymoon ended in disaster, but don’t think Poyet gets a great grade just for a pair of Cup runs and rescuing the season. The boss had plenty of chances to save his team a bit of late-season drama, only to fail. That said, there’s promise for Gus’ guys once he gets more of his own flavor in the side.
Grade: di Canio, F; Poyet C-

Swansea City – Michael Laudrup, Garry Monk
When you have a PST writer comparing you to Don Draper, that isn’t a compliment. Laudrup failed, leaving a player to step up and clean up the pieces. Monk did that after a shaky start, and earned himself a three-year extension. Training ground dustups were old hat by the end of the season, but the play improved.
Grade: Laudrup, D; Monk C+

source: ReutersTottenham Hotspur – Andre Villas-Boas, Tim Sherwood
It almost feels unfair to grade either of these gents considering Daniel Levy seemed intent on making sure both of their jobs were complicated. AVB claimed to have a handful of players he didn’t want after Spurs spending spree, and while that’s not ideal, who says that? Sherwood did the world’s best job doing anything soccer-related ever, according to him.
Grade: AVB, C-; Sherwood C+; Levy, F

West Bromwich Albion – Steve Clarke, Pepe Mel
Maybe it’s the concussions, but Clarke’s was the only manager whose name I couldn’t recall from memory. A forgettable start to the season, and Mel barely saved things — if you can even call it that — before mutually-parting ways with the club today. Bad year for the Baggies, but it obviously could’ve been worse. Perhaps Clarke was dealing with expectations that were too high, but still…
Grade: Clarke, D+; Mel D+

West Ham United – Sam Allardyce
Well, well, well Big Sam. The Irons had to contend with an injury to their prime signing in Andy Carroll, but really isn’t that the argument against putting all your eggs in one basket? Allardyce saved his team from the drop, and how, but he also guided his team into said danger.
Grade: C-

Arsenal sends Gabriel Paulista to Valencia

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Arsenal has a thin defense, but that hasn’t stopped Arsene Wenger from thinning the squad even further.

Gabriel Paulista is headed back to the Spanish top flight after the completion of his transfer to Valencia. The Brazilian was sold for a reported $12.8 million, just below the $14 million price tag Arsenal coughed up to Villareal back in January, 2015. He will partner with Manchester City loanee Eliaquim Mangala at Valencia.

The 26-year-old made 64 appearances for the Gunners across all competitions, including 46 in the Premier League. His only goal for the club was Arsenal’s first of a 2-0 win over Bournemouth in December, 2015. His high-water mark with the club was a 120-minute performance against Manchester City in the FA Cup semifinals where Arsenal came back to win 2-1 on an Alexis Sanchez goal in extra time.

“We would like to thank Gabriel for his contribution to the club and to wish him well for his return to La Liga with Valencia,” Arsenal said in its confirmation of the deal.

Paulista was utilized more than expected last season thanks to an injury crisis at the back, and still the Arsenal squad doesn’t seem fat enough to offload defenders, but Gabriel’s over-aggressive nature and tackling inaccuracy led him to an early exit.

With Arsene Wenger now deploying a back-three, the only natural central defenders currently on the roster are Laurent Koscielny, Per Mertesacker, Shkodran Mustafi, and Rob Holding. Koscielny is suspended from a red card at the end of last season, and Mertesacker is battling a head injury. Sead Kolasinac, Nacho Monreal, and Calum Chambers have played CB for the Gunners in the recent past, but it is not their natural position.

Fabian Johnson misses Gladbach training with injury

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With John Brooks already out long-term due to a thigh injury, the United States may have another key injury to work around.

According to Borussia Monchengladbach manager Dieter Hecking, full-back/winger Fabian Johnson missed training on Friday due to an unspecified injury, and is now a question mark for Gladbach’s home match on Sunday against FC Koln. It could be nothing, but even the scare is cause for concern among U.S. fans.

Johnson has battled a few injuries the past couple of seasons, including a hamstring problem last spring that kept him out for nearly two months, including a pair of World Cup qualifiers in March.

Johnson’s absence would leave a hole at right-back for the United States. The 29-year-old has been deployed some at right wing for the USMNT, but he has been relatively poor at that position in the national setup, looking better when pushed further back where he is given more defensive duties, roaming forward with less frequency but more intent.

In place of Johnson, another converted winger in Graham Zusi has been seeing more time at right-back, but he offers less in the attack and lacks Johnson’s recovery speed, meaning mistakes by the Sporting KC veteran are punished more often.

Falcao scores again to extend red hot start

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Monaco is hoping to ride out the final two weeks of the transfer window with 18-year-old wonderkid Kylian Mbappe still in tow.

While they wait, they aren’t missing a beat.

With Mbappe out of the squad, Radamel Falcao has begun the 2017/18 Ligue 1 season as Europe’s hottest goalscorer. He bagged a hat-trick last weekend with Mbappe on the bench to give him four goals in the first two league matches. Then, with Mbappe out of the squad entirely, Falcao netted the winner in a 1-0 road win over FC Metz.

Falcao has scored five goals so far this year, and his club has a +5 goal differential. In a way, Falcao has already been worth six points thus far.

Thanks in part to Ligue 1’s early start, Falcao’s five league goals are by far more than anyone else in the major European leagues. Four players have scored a pair of Premier League goals, nobody in La Liga or the Bundesliga have scored more than one, and the Serie A season has yet to start.

The Colombian did the same thing last season. After eventually coming off the shelf from to hamstring and concussion problems to start the season, Falcao scored 10 goals in 10 Ligue 1 matches leading up to the new calendar year.

At 31 years old, Falcao isn’t a long-term solution and the club will clearly look to retain Mbappe despite Falcao’s hot start, but should they lose the young Frenchman, the club will be in good hands while they search for a replacement over the next year.

Arena should give Ream a look in Brooks’ absence

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With John Brooks out three months thanks to a horribly timed thigh injury, the United States yet again has to scramble to fill a void at the back. It’s not the first time an injury to Brooks has left the USMNT scrambling for cover at a thin position.

In the successful Gold Cup this past summer, with a largely domestic squad in place, Omar Gonzalez saw the bulk of the time at central defender, with Matt Besler his partner through the final two matches. However, with European-based players now in contention for spots with the early September international break, those two are unlikely to continue, at least not together.

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The most obvious choice to start September 1st against Costa Rica and likely shoo-in should he remain healthy for the next two weeks is Geoff Cameron. The 32-year-old has been back and forth between defense and midfield with club and country, and although he has publicly acknowledged his preference for a spot higher up the pitch, he was used in a back-three in Stoke City’s Premier League opener last weekend and is steadiest at the back.

But with a spot next to Cameron up for grabs in Brooks’ absence, a player who should get serious consideration is United States fill-in extraordinaire Tim Ream.

Ream has had to work hard to earn his place with the U.S., and while he’s seen time of late, he’s not been a first-choice pick. The 29-year-old has four caps so far in 2017, with two of those starts, including one in the impressive 1-1 draw against Mexico at the Azteca with the US still clawing its way back up the Hex standings. Even then, Ream would likely not have earned that spot had Arena not chosen to rotate nearly the entire squad between the pair of qualifiers in that window. His other start this year, the 1-1 draw at Panama, only came after Cameron pulled out of the squad the day of the game with a late injury. The last time Ream started back-to-back matches for the U.S. came back in 2015 when he was somewhat of a regular through the second half of the calendar year.

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But now, with Brooks out, Ream looks like the perfect man to fill in again. The 29-year-old defender finished last season in top form as Fulham narrowly missed out on promotion, earning the official website’s Man of the Match award in a May 2nd draw with Brentford, and won it again in the club’s final match of the season.

Without missing a beat, Ream has picked up where he left off last campaign in the first few matches this month. Last weekend against Reading at the Madjeski Stadium, Ream’s center-back partner Tomas Kalas was sent off 36 seconds into the match, forcing Fulham to play a man down for 89 minutes. Ream and company solidified the back, conceding just once in the 61st minute en route to a 1-1 draw.

The club still likely requires reinforcements at the CB position – Ream was forced to partner with right-back Denis Odoi against Reading with Kalas suspended and Michael Madl injured – meaning Ream could see an influx of competition in the coming weeks. However, as it stands, the American is far and away the best (and most improved) central defender on a club favored for promotion.

Gonzalez performed well in the Gold Cup, and Matt Besler was serviceable, but with few other options in the heart of defense to take Brooks’ place, Bruce Arena could yet again look to Ream for an in-form replacement.