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Lesson of the day: Still a lot to learn about Jurgen Klinsmann


Nobody likes to look dumb, but over the past two weeks, Jurgen Klinsmann’s done a good job making so many U.S. soccer followers look foolish. Some prescient souls saw Eddie Johnson missing the 30-man squad, while others suspected the qualifying faith Klinsmann showed in Brad Evans would expire come June. For the most part, Thursday’s announcement created a graveyard of predictions, with their authors left to mourn the failure of their foresight.

Few people thought Landon Donovan would be going home, and most of those who did thought he’d get a full camp to play his way to Brazil. And the slew of 2018-looking choices? Some thought it could break that way, but not at the expense of people like Donovan, Clarence Goodson, Maurice Edu and Michael Parkhurst. Today, ours is a profession of humbled souls.

On the surface, it looks like conventional wisdom took a huge hit on Thursday, but that assumes there is any conventional wisdom when comes to Klinsmann. That may not be the case. Honest, affable and at times blunt in his assessments of his own squad, the U.S. boss gives the impression he’s being open, but just like any head coach, there are times when that honesty is more forthright than others.

[MORE: Other countries who have “snubbed” stars]

Take Landon Donovan. Coming out of last month’s friendly against Mexico, Klinsmann ran cover for the struggling icon by pointing to a knee problem as the reason he didn’t start over Brad Davis. Now, particularly with Donovan missing no time for the Galaxy, it’s clear that wasn’t the only reason. Brad Davis was just better, to Klinsmann’s mind, so was Chris Wondolowski as a potential forward option. Somehow, most people didn’t get the hint.

Instead, most applied instinct to the problem, eventually concluding that a man of Donovan’s résumé couldn’t be excluded. They applied past experience to the quandary and came up with no relevant scenarios where Donovan would be left home. We all fell back on what we perceived as common sense only to realize the common sense we’ve developed doesn’t apply to Klinsmann. The team’s head coach had somehow taken the job without incorporating any of our assumptions.

[MORE from SOCCERLY: Klinsmann’s son deletes cruel Donovan tweet, deletes account]

With the shock of Thursday’s announcement finally settling it, there are five assumptions that now seem particularly flawed:

source: Reuters
Brad Evans (C) of the U.S. celebrates with his teammate Graham Zusi (R), as they run past Jamaica’s Alvas Powell, after scoring a goal in their 2014 World Cup qualifying soccer match in Kingston June 7, 2013. (REUTERS/Gilbert Bellamy)

1. Qualifying definitely matters – Time with the national team during the last two years’ was important, but the spells we saw on television was a small part of a bigger picture. We players like Eddie Johnson and Brad Evans play important roles, but we didn’t see how close their competition was to over taking them. We didn’t see as the training, testing, and progression. We didn’t know what each player was being asked to do.

For Klinsmann, perhaps more than most coaches, those aspects are important. It’s a sign of your professionalism. In some cases, that leaves players slipping out of the team, but in others, the approach provides an opportunity to make up the gap.

Players like Brad Davis and Chris Wondolowski took advantage of their opportunities both in games and out. Others did not.

2. 2018 is four years away – With players like Donovan, Edu, Evans seemingly fighting for places, three spots for 2018 prospects seemed difficult to justify. But that also assumed players like Goodson, Evans, and Parkhurst were likely to go. Free up those spots, and the DeAndre Yedlins and John Brooks of the world have room.

The problem heading into Thursday’s announcement was assuming the virtues of competition Klinsmann espoused throughout qualifying — the idea of using the cycle to prove yourself for Brazil — would preclude him adopting a focus on 2018. Thursday reminded of something we should have kept in mind all along: Klinsmann’s not only building a team for a World Cup. He’s building a program.

3. May was going to be a competition – Central midfield. Right back. Attack, both in midfield and up top. The theory was that May would be used to let these battles play out – that the friendlies would serve as auditions. Obviously, that assumption is wrong.

Klinsmann has always put a premium of what you show in training and how you test in the gym. It’s doesn’t supersede results on the field, but it does augment them. After looking at his bubble players for a week, Klinsmann had seen enough. How players performed over a week’s time in camp either confirmed or denied what Klinsmann already knew.

source: Getty Images
Timothy Chandler (L) of Nuernberg battles for the ball with Juan Arango of Moenchengladbach during the Bundesliga match between 1.FC Nuernberg and Borussia Moenchengladbach at Easy Credit Stadium. Chandler made the U.S.’s final World Cup 2014 squad. (Photo by Johannes Simon/Bongarts/Getty Images)

4. Klinsmann would approach this like other coaches – When Bob Bradley was short on forwards before leaving for South Africa, he called in the likes of Edson Buddle, Robbie Findley, Herculez Gomez, and Eddie Johnson to fight it out. Klinsmann could have done the same with some of his question marks, but he chose not to.

He didn’t wait until June 2 to make a decision on the Timmy Chandlers, Yedlins, and Brooks of the world. Whereas other coaches would have wanted to use Nigeria and Turkey as tests, Klinsmann’s going to use them to refine his final product.

5. The same criteria applied to everybody – Why is Brad Davis going while Landon Donovan stays? That’s apples to apples. The idea of Donovan going ahead of Green, Brooks, or Yedlin? Apples to orange seeds.

These last three years have been about competition, but when the roster was finally named, that competition meant different things for different players. Brad Evans hit all the marks, but he still lost out, and although Michael Parkhurst had seemingly proved his value, he’s returning to Columbus. Yedlin and Timmy Chandler, clearly judged against different criteria, are going to Brazil.

The extent to which any of Klinsmann’s choices were right or wrong is a different discussion. What’s clearly been proven wrong is our assumptions.

So many of the principles we tried to apply to Klinsmann’s selection were ill-founded. Even after three years, we seem to know so little about the U.S.’s boss.


PST’s writers predict the USA vs. Mexico score

United States v Mexico - International Friendly
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This is it. Don’t get scared now.

On Saturday the U.S. national team take on Mexico in the CONCACAF Cup at the Pasadena Rose Bowl, as the bitter rivals square off to decide who will be going to the 2017 Confederations Cup.

[ FULL PREVIEW: USA vs. Mexico ]

The time for talking is over. Whoever wins the one-off game in California will be heading to Russia a year before the 2018 World Cup to represent the CONCACAF region.

Click on the link above for a comprehensive preview of everything you need to know heading into Saturday’s massive game, while below all five of our writers predict the score and how the game will pan out.

[ MORE: Bedoya out for USA ]

Do you agree? Let us know in the comments below.

Joe Prince-Wright

USA 2-2 Mexico (USA win on penalty kicks)

For some reason, I think this is going to PKs. Expect a fast, frenetic opening and if the U.S. can keep things level at the break then I think they have a great chance. I see a dramatic evening playing out in this dramatic rivalry. U.S. win. just.

Nicholas Mendola

USA 3-2 Mexico

After the game, one in which Fabian Johnson serves the game winner to Clint Dempsey, Klinsmann runs shirtless across the field with “Benny who?” painted on his chest. On the back, he’s painted, “I’m kidding, America. Benny is a wonderful midfielder and a blessing to our shores.”

Kyle Bonn

USA 0-2 Mexico

The U.S. limped its way through the Gold Cup and still doesn’t have any idea what its best 11 is. Mexico takes this one despite turmoil at the top. (Also the team I pick usually doesn’t win, so I’m all in with the reverse jinx)

Andy Edwards

USA 1-2 Mexico

Too much possession conceded to Mexico, too much pressure on the USMNT defense… just like the Gold Cup, except against even better opposition.

Kyle Lynch

USA 1-2 Mexico

The United States takes an early lead, but Mexico fights back and wins it all in Jurgen Klinsmann’s final game as USMNT manager.

Blatter, Platini both officially appeal FIFA suspension

SAINT PETERSBURG, RUSSIA - JULY 25:  FIFA President Joseph S. Blatter and UEFA President Michel Platini look on during the Team Seminar ahead of the Preliminary Draw of the 2018 FIFA World Cup at the Corinthia Hotel on July 25, 2015 in Saint Petersburg, Russia.  (Photo by Shaun Botterill/Getty Images)
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Suspended FIFA executives Sepp Blatter and Michel Platini have both officially appealed their 90-day bans through various means in attempts to clear their names.

The pair have been forced to temporarily vacate their office due to an investigation by Swiss authorities into corruption charges based on a “disloyal payment” of around $2 million from Blatter to Platini in 2011.

Blatter’s appeal was lodged within FIFA on Friday, with the president’s lawyer confirming he has “requested additional proceedings before the Adjudicatory Chamber of the Ethics Committee and filed an appeal with the Appeal Committee.”

Blatter’s American lawyer Richard Cullen said he is “very hopeful” the suspension will be lifted on appeal, while his lawyer team back on Thursday argued in a statement that the FIFA Ethics Committee “based its decision [to suspend Blatter] on a misunderstanding of the actions of the attorney general in Switzerland, which has opened an investigation but brought no charge against the president.”

The New York Times obtained a copy of the appeal, in which Blatter’s lawyers demand to see the case file which the Ethics Committee reviewed upon its decision to suspend the 79-year-old. It also asks that he receive a full opportunity to argue his innocence in front of the committee; previously, he was only afforded a short interview with Swiss investigators.

Meanwhile, Platini’s appeal came through Saturday morning and is filed with the Court of Arbitration for Sport. His case has received official, legal backing from the French FA as his home nominating association for the upcoming presidential election. Using the French FA’s support, Platini can bypass the FIFA appeals system which he individually must exhaust before moving to the Court of Arbitration for Sport.

CONMEBOL has also publicly supported Platini, issuing a statement that says it “does not agree” with the decision to suspend him, calling it “untimely and disproportionate” while stating, “The presumption of innocence is a fundamental right that has to be considered. Mr. Platini has not been found guilty of any charge, therefore the provisional ban jeopardizes the integrity of the electoral process to the FIFA presidency, of which Mr. Platini is a candidate.”

Platini has not been replaced at his UEFA presidential post, with no interim leader named. “This is because the UEFA executive committee is aware that the UEFA president will immediately take all necessary steps to appeal the decision of the FIFA ethics committee to clear his name,” UEFA said in a statement. They confirmed he will not continue his duties while under punishment.

The FIFA Executive Committee has announced it will hold an emergency meeting on October 20 to discuss the situation. Among the topics that will be considered will be a decision on whether to postpone the February 26 presidential election.