Comparing Bradley to Källström may be flattering, but it doesn’t reflect reality for U.S. stars

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Should Michael Bradley have gotten a look from Arsenal in January? Implicitly, that’s what his father, Stabæk head coach and former U.S. national team boss Bob Bradley, is saying when he compares his son to Arsenal loanee Kim Källström.

The argument, recently articulated to Slate, seems to be this: The Swedish international, who arrived at Arsenal in January from Spartak Moscow, is not as good as the now-Toronto FC midfielder. Therefore Bradley, who would have entertained a move to London in January, should have garnered more of Arsène Wenger’s attention.

From Slate’s post:

… the coach says that Michael had hoped to join a prominent European club and felt like Arsenal would have been a good fit. Michael, though, didn’t get the consideration from manager Arsène Wenger that he felt he merited.

“I think American players and coaches have to fight really hard for respect,” Bob Bradley said. “In January, Arsenal [was] looking to add a midfielder, and they chose Kim Källström. Kim Källström’s not a bad player, but I think Michael feels pretty strongly that he’s better, and so Arsène Wenger must not feel that way, and [Arsenal chief executive] Ivan Gazidis must not feel that way. So sometimes, no matter what you do, you don’t get the respect you think you deserve.”

Perhaps Bradley truly has been slighted, but this is a poor way of illustrating it. Essentially, Bob Bradley is saying that if a midfielder is better than Arsenal’s worst player at the position, he should feel slighted if he’s not on the team’s payroll. So if you accept the Källström is not the player that Michael Bradley is (a safe but perhaps disputable claim), then Arsène Wenger was wrong to let the U.S. international slip through those professorial digits.

source: Getty Images
31-year-old Swedish international Kim Källström failed to make an impact during his loan at Arsenal, making four appearances in six months. (Source: Getty Images)

This is a fallacy that’s used time and time again, one that assumes a favorable comparison to the worst part of a population means you belong in the pool. In sports, we most often here this with Major League Baseball Hall of Fame candidates, but the logic behind it is just as flawed in other circumstances. Somebody from outside a group being better may not be an argument for inclusion. It may be an argument for excluding a flaw from the group.

The Källström case is a good example. When he was acquired by Arsenal, few thought he would help the Gunners’ pursuit of a title. Those doubters were proved correct.  Between injury problems, ineffectiveness, and the mere depth of midfielders Arsenal already had in its squad, Källström was a non-factor. While Bradley may be a better player, he also may have just been a slightly more talented non-factor. The argument here isn’t Wenger should have acquired Bradley. It’s Wenger shouldn’t have acquired Källström.

Then, of course, there’s the matter of Källström only being on loan, not permanently transferred to Arsenal. Perhaps Bradley could have also been loaned, but given how the price Roma was able to get from Major League Soccer for its midfielder (around $10 million), it’s easy to believe the club when its says moving Bradley was not necessarily part of its plan. In the face of an unexpected, eight-figure offer for him? Sure, change the plan. But a loan deal to Arsenal? Might as well just keep Bradley as depth for its title pursuit.

Then there’s the idea that being better than Källström makes Bradley the most qualified candidate to fill that spot. That’s clearly not the case, a status that becomes only slightly less clear if you narrow the field to just the available candidates. For a club like Arsenal, though, it is instructive to ask: Among all the available midfielders in the world, was Michael Bradley the best option? That seems unlikely. Just because Arsenal made a poor choice in Källström doesn’t mean in a perfect decision would have landed Bradley in London.

The premise to this whole line of thought seems to be Americans have it harder than other players. That may be true, but let’s remember where Bradley was when this Arsenal rejection occurred? He was at AS Roma, one of the bigger teams in one of the world’s most storied leagues. True, there is now a heavy American influence at Roma, but doesn’t that represent a paved road instead of a bumpy one?

Clint Dempsey was recently at Tottenham. Tim Howard played for Manchester United. Landon Donovan has played for Bayern Munich, and Oguchi Onyewu was once under contract with AC Milan. How do those opportunities jive with the idea of an anti-American bias? Can we really say that any of those players deserved better opportunities than they’ve seen? No.

Some suspicion in this area is justified, but right now, suspicion is all we have. There is no evidence that there’s an established mechanism depriving Americans of opportunities. A far more reasonable explanation: At this point, there isn’t a player whose talents justify that kind of attention.

U.S. Open Cup roundup: Poku lifts Miami; Red Bulls, Cincy win on PKs

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While MLS represents the majority of the remaining clubs in this year’s U.S. Open Cup, one side continues to defy the odds.

[ MORE: Minnesota United adds Hearts midfielder Sam Nicholson ]

Miami FC reached their first quarterfinal in club history after knocking off Atlanta United late on Wednesday, behind a goal and an assist from Kwadwo Poku. The victory for Miami sets up a date with FC Cincinnati — who pulled off an unbelievable shootout win against the Chicago Fire.

Meanwhile, the New York Red Bulls and New England Revolution both advanced on the night with wins over the Philadelphia Union and D.C. United, respectively. The Red Bulls and Revs will meet in the final eight as well.

Sporting KC kept its hope of hoisting a fourth U.S. Open Cup title alive on Wednesday with a 2-0 win over the Houston Dynamo. The 2015 winners will take on FC Dallas — who defeated the Colorado Rapids on Tuesday night.

Here are all the results from tonight’s Open Cup action.

Houston Dynamo 0-2 Sporting KC
New England Revolution 2-1 D.C. United
Miami FC 3-2 Atlanta United
New York Red Bulls 1-1 (5-3 on PKs) Philadelphia Union
FC Cincinnati 0-0 (3-1 on PKs) Chicago Fire

Late action (10:30 p.m. ET kick off)

San Jose Earthquakes vs. Seattle Sounders
LA Galaxy vs. Sacramento Republic

Report: City Football Group set to expand outreach with Girona deal

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City Football Group appears on the verge of adding to its global outreach, and it’s next destination looks to be in Spain.

[ MORE: Are Southampton’s days of selling behind the club? ]

The group of investors, which are known for controlling Premier League side Manchester City, are reportedly nearing a deal to purchase a partial stake in Spanish club Girona — which is set to make its La Liga debut in 2017/18.

CFG is said to be gaining a near “50 percent” stake in the club, with the rest of the club owned by Media Base, a company owned by Pep Guardiola‘s brother, Pere.

Over recent years, CFG has vastly expanded its ownership outreach and currently has a stake in five clubs around the world, with Girona set to be the sixth.

MLS side New York City FC, Australian A-League side Melbourne City FC, Japan’s Yokohama F. Marinos and Club Atletico Torque in Uruguay are all part of the CFG enterprise, alongside Man City.

New York Red Bulls ink goalkeeper Luis Robles to new deal

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The “Iron Man” will keep up his amazing journey with the New York Red Bulls, after signing a new deal with the club on Wednesday.

[ MORE: Wesley Sneijder on verge of joining Los Angeles FC ]

Goalkeeper Luis Robles has extended his contract with the reigning Eastern Conference champions, as the American continues to raise his consecutive starts streak, which stands at 157.

The terms of the deal were not disclosed in the club’s release.

Robles joined the Red Bulls back in 2012 after playing in Germany, and the shot-stopper hasn’t missed a start ever since.

Report: Minnesota United adds Hearts midfielder Sam Nicholson

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Minnesota United has had its shares of ups and down in its debut MLS season, but the Loons are on the verge making an exciting young signing.

[ MORE: Wesley Sneijder closing in on Los Angeles FC move ]

ESPN FC is reporting that Minnesota will sign Hearts winger Sam Nicholson from the Scottish Premier League on a deal that makes him a Loon until 2019.

The young attacker is expected to join the MLS side when the summer transfer window opens on July 10.

Nicholson, 22, has played with the Edinburgh side since his youth days, and made his senior debut with the club in 2013. During his time at Hearts, Nicholson scored 16 goals in all competitions for the team.

Last season, Nicholson missed 16 matches due to a significant knee injury.

According to the report, Scottish sides Rangers and Aberdeen were also among those interested in acquiring Nicholson, while English Championship clubs Bristol City and Barnsley also reached out about the attacker.