United States' Jozy Altidore, right, shouts out as he pulls up injured as Ghana's John Boye looks on during the group G World Cup soccer match between Ghana and the United States at the Arena das Dunas in Natal, Brazil, Monday, June 16, 2014. (AP Photo/Dolores Ochoa)

Coy but positive, Klinsmann leaves us in the dark about Altidore


Amid the same press conference where Jurgen Klinsmann passed along the good news about Matt Besler, there was little new information about an equally pressing pressing concern. For all the uncertainty the U.S. experienced at the back on Monday once their starting center back left at halftime, the team was just as aimless at the top of its formation, where a 21st minute hamstring injury to starting striker Jozy Altidore forced Aron Johannsson into the game. Over the 69 minutes that followed, the U.S. missed its outlet man, struggling to pass through midfield as it kept the ball on the ground.

Unfortunately for Altidore, his hamstring injury is more severe than Besler’s, though the exact extent of the problem is unknown. With what’s become a trademark if positive coyness, Klinsmann managed to talk about his striker’s plight without providing specifics on the injury, let along a potential recovery.

From reporting by ESPNFC:

“We’ve got to see how he now reacts the next couple of days with his hamstring, and we’re full of hope that he comes back still in the tournament …”

“That’s what we’re going to work on every day. The medical staff is doing a tremendous job [for] weeks, so we still have the hope that Jozy will be back. How quickly, that is down to his healing process.”

Assume you didn’t see the way Altidore went down on Monday and are hoping he’ll be ready on Sunday. See anything in Klinsmann’s response that eliminates that possibility? Or, for that matter, describes it as improbably, likely, or any place on our uncertain spectrum? Perhaps the allusion to “in the tournament” does, but thanks to the head coach’s coyness, somebody could convince themselves the Altidore will play against Portugal.

Put yourself on the other end of that see-saw, though. Assume you saw the injury, think the hamstring’s done, and Altidore’s not coming back this tournament.

Now re-read Klinsmann’s quote. There’s nothing there that precludes that scenario, too. As it concerns Altidore’s injury, Klinsmann’s words are basically useless.

Don’t blame Klinsmann for that. If anything, respect him (and if not him, then his job). He’s trying to obscure the picture.

The U.S. boss went on to admit as much, though in doing to, he fully engaged the prospect of a Jozy-less future:

“I don’t want to go too deep into details, because obviously we want Portugal to guess a little bit as well, but when one of your key players is not available, does it change certain things? Absolutely, it does.

Jozy is a very strong key player in our group, so we’ll think about the right way to handle that situation.

We’ll still field 11. We’re not a man down.”

After reading all that, you probably have a gut feeling about whether Altidore plays. Of course, I have my own. Start with the caution we saw Klinsmann use toward Besler, add in the possible severity of Altidore’s injury, and I think he’s out. I think he’s way out. Not only do I not see Altidore featuring for Portugal, I doubt we’ll see him against Germany, either. If he comes back at all this tournament, I’ll be slightly surprised.

Do I know that with any certainty? Of course not. Klinsmann’s intent on making sure nobody knows if Jozy Altidore will be ready for Manaus. Given the information can only help the Portuguese prepare, you can’t blame him for leaving us in the dark.

Sunderland confirm resignation of manager Dick Advocaat

SUNDERLAND, ENGLAND - OCTOBER 03:  Dick Advocaat manager of Sunderland looks on prior to the Barclays Premier League match between Sunderland and West Ham United at the Stadium of Light in Sunderland, United Kingdom.  (Photo by Steve Welsh/Getty Images)
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With rumors swirling of his resignation, Sunderland have confirmed this morning that Dick Advocaat has left his post as Sunderland manager with zero financial compensation despite the protests of the chairman.

Advocaat came on in March as an emergency signing, successfully saving Sunderland from relegation with a solid run of form to finish the season. The 68-year-old Dutchman pondered at length this summer if he wished to continue on, with his wife reportedly urging him to step down, but he chose to continue on with the new season after successful persuasion from the front office.

Unfortunately, things have not gone as planned, with Sunderland sitting 19th in the table, only above Newcastle on goal differential and without a single win on the season. They’ve conceded a whopping 18 goals so far this season through eight league matches.

“I have made the decision to go after only eight games as I felt it was important to give everyone time turn things around – like we did last year,” Advocaat said upon his departure. “I am thankful to the chairman for understanding my feelings and I remain on good terms with everyone at the club.

“I wish Ellis [Short], Lee [Congerton], all of the staff, players and of course the supporters, who made me feel so welcome here, the very best of luck for the rest of the season. I have some wonderful memories to take with me and I hope I will return to see everybody again in the future.”

“I am truly saddened by Dick’s decision,” chairman Ellis Short said, “but I respect him for his honesty and for doing what he feels is right for the club. He is a man of integrity and a true football person. He was hugely respectful of the club in taking this decision and he acted 100% in our best interests. It is also testament to his character that he has forgone any kind of a financial settlement, something which is very unusual in football.”

Meanwhile, the Black Cats have dipped into what is becoming a perennial cycle, making a managerial change for the fourth time in the last four seasons.

Rumors are swirling that a host of experienced Premier League managers could be up for the job, including the currently unemployed Sam Allardyce and Harry Redknapp. Other linked names include former Leicester manager Nigel Pearson and current Burnley boss Sean Dyche.

Sepp Blatter’s daughter slams media for ruining her father’s reputation

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Sepp Blatter’s daughter blames the media, not her father, for Sepp’s downfall as the head of FIFA and believes he will not step down until the February congress as he initially announced.

“The media has ruined his reputation,” Corinne Blatter told Swiss newspaper Blick. “Why are they picking on him? What did he do to them? … It’s not just envy. It’s hatred.”

A host of major sponsors, including Coca-Cola, McDonalds and Visa called for Blatter’s immediate resignation as president of FIFA, to which the 79-year-old swiftly rejected. This all came after Blatter was called in by Swiss authorities for questioning after the opening of an investigation surrounding corporate mismanagement charges.

“I was afraid that they now take him away in handcuffs,” Corinne said. “He told me, ‘I must be dreaming.’ A federal policeman assured me that he could after hearing home.”

Blick pressed Corinne on many issues, all of which she defender her father. She refused to comment on many that had to do with the investigation, but did give us this gem when asked how Sepp likes to spend his money.

“He buys shoes and travel bags. He has worked 40 years. His life is modest, without any extravagance. He doesn’t play golf or go sailing.”

Shoes and handbags. What an image.