Belgium v USA: Round of 16 - 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil

Analyzing Jurgen Klinsmann’s work at the World Cup: Job well done?

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For a moment, let’s not discuss the roster selection. The last thing we need when assessing Jurgen Klinsmann’s work inside the World Cup is to pretend Landon Donovan would’ve been in Chris Wondolowski’s cleats on top of goal, during a free kick Landon Donovan would’ve been standing over if Landon Donovan were in the lineup and Julian Green were not (the latter scored, you know, and is now a vested American player forever).

But how did Klinsmann fare in selecting his Starting XI and subs? He certainly wasn’t perfect, but there’s enough evidence to indicate the future is bright for the German as a match day manager.

source: Getty Images

Match 1: Ghana, W 2-1
Who knows how the States would’ve performed under Klinsmann’s original plan, as the manager was forced to take off his best striker after 23 minutes and his most consistent center back after 45. Klinsmann had to use two subs before the second half began, and went with Aron Johannsson for Jozy Altidore and John Anthony Brooks for Matt Besler.

In the latter case, there were questions as to why Klinsmann didn’t turn to Omar Gonzalez in place of Brooks (more on him later). The coach’s final move was to pull of Ale Bedoya for Graham Zusi. Hindsight is always 20/20, but Zusi sent in the ball in that Brooks headed home for the game-winner. Poor marking or not, that’s what we can a ‘feather in the cap’ of Klinsmann.

Match 2: Portugal, D 2-2
Forced to reconsider his striker usage, Klinsmann surprised by using Clint Dempsey alone up-top. This allowed him to move Zusi and Bedoya out wide, while changing his midfield four to a tight triangle with Kyle Beckerman lending some safety for Jermaine Jones and Michael Bradley to each probe forward.

source: APHe keeps his defense in tact, and Geoff Cameron rewards him with an all-time US flub to set-up Nani for the first goal. But the Dempsey move pays off, as the Texan is a major source of pressure on the beleaguered Portuguese back line.

Klinsmann’s sub of DeAndre Yedlin for Bedoya pays off within nine minutes, as the Seattle Sounders youngster kickstarts the play that led to Dempsey’s equalizer. Cristiano Ronaldo works a bit of individual magic to find Portugal a point late, but most people would’ve accepted any result if it means Ronaldo would’ve only bested the US once over 90 minutes. The Cameron flub is ultimately what cost the three points, and ultimately it’s hard to fault the coach for starting a man who played in more Premier League games than all but nine players in 2013/14 (three of whom were goalkeepers).

Match 3: Germany, L 0-1
“Why is he starting Gonzalez?” was the cry from many, as Cameron exited the lineup after a tough run against Portugal. Klinsmann also plugged in Brad Davis for Bedoya, the latter of whom was ineffective overall despite many chances (see Belgium analysis).

Davis would end up leaving after 59 minutes in favor of a return from Bedoya. This is where those who believe Donovan would’ve made a big difference — I don’t — have a big argument. Clearly, Klinsmann wanted to use this formation with a two men out very wide but could not find an option he loved. We knew this was a problem when Brek Shea continued to get mentions despite doing very little in club ball. Flat out: Klinsmann could not find the man he needed for this position, but is it fair to say it’s because that man was unavailable to his nation?

Whatever the case, the States needed to limit German goals in order to advance. They did that, and Gonzalez was strong. It’s hard not to call this a success.

source: Getty Images

Match 4: Belgium, L 1-2 (et)
The formation went bonkers, as Klinsmann went a little ‘mad scientist’ with his set-up. It’s clear he wanted to get Cameron back on the pitch without sacrificing what he saw as an in-form Gonzalez (and let’s face it: when Omar’s been good, he’s been very good).

Cameron on the outside would allow the dangerous Fabian Johnson to take more chances, while Klinsmann hoped Graham Zusi could handle more central responsibilities in the process (that didn’t work so well). But in doing so, Klinsmann had to pull Kyle Beckerman from the lineup, removing a player who had done yeoman’s work in the tournament. It was a questionable button to push.

It’s clear Altidore was a smokescreen, though he’s also not the sort of player I personally fancy as a sub. You want him out there wearing defenses down for the second striker or swift little attackers.

And here’s the biggest problem I had with Klinsmann the whole tournament: it’s clear Green, while green, has a skill set others on the roster do not have. There’s a little bit of early-Donovan to his game, with the cool to collect that late goal. At age 19, perhaps he would’ve been roasted on the defensive responsibilities that Klinsmann gave Bedoya and other wide players… but maybe not? That position was a big problem for the U.S., and Green slotted home on his first touch (which may be a World Cup record).

For the record, Klinsmann was right about stoppage time. There were a sub and a goal in the second period. That’s rarely, if ever, one minute.

Conclusion: All-in-all, the States were outclassed by Belgium. In fact, they didn’t hold much of the play at all until Eden Hazard subbed out of the match. Frankly, the US may have had the least talented roster of any team that played in the group, but whether it was their mettle, how Klinsmann organized them or, likely, a combination of both factors, the States progressed out of an incredibly-tough group and are a stoppage time finish away from moving on to Argentina.

As an aside on all the Wondolowski-miss hullaballoo, I was around a group of pretty respected coaches for the game and — after an initial cursing bout — most agreed that Thibaut Courtois played the chance very well and probably could’ve stopped an on-target chance. Don’t know if I agree, but…

Manchester City confirm $22.5 million signing of Claudio Bravo

FOXBORO, MA - JUNE 10:  Claudio Bravo #1 of Chile passes the ball during a 2016 Copa America Centenario Group D match between Chile and Bolivia in the first half at Gillette Stadium on June 10, 2016 in Foxboro, Massachusetts. (Photo by Jim Rogash/Getty Images)
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It’s done.

Claudio Bravo, 33, has signed a four-year contract at Manchester City as the club announced his $22.5 million transfer from Barcelona on Thursday.

[ MORE: Saints close to Boufal deal ]

Bravo flew in to Manchester earlier this week and Pep Guardiola finally has the goalkeeper he’s been craving as he revealed the Chilean international is someone “he’s admired for a number of years.”

With Joe Hart given the cold shoulder and veteran Willy Caballero handed the starting spot in goal for City’s first two Premier League games of the season, it always seemed likely that a goalkeeper was lined up.

[ MORE: Solo ban about much more ]

Speaking to the club website about his move to City after spending the last two seasons at Barcelona, Bravo is looking forward to the challenge ahead.

“I’m very proud to be joining Manchester City. I know the Club is building something very special and I hope I can be part of many successes in the coming years,” Bravo said. “I have followed City’s progress in recent years and obviously know some of my new team-mates from the Copa America.

“It is not easy to leave a club like Barcelona where I had two fantastic years, but the opportunity to work with Pep Guardiola was too good to refuse. Now I will challenge the other great goalkeepers the Club has and together I hope we can win many trophies.”

So, now the picture is even clearer for Hart as despite Bravo claiming he is at the Etihad Stadium to “challenge the other great goalkeepers” they have, we all know he is the new numero uno. Hart will have to find a move elsewhere if he wants to play regularly but his options are running out with Everton’s manager Ronald Koeman saying they are no interested in signing Hart.

Over the last two seasons Bravo has split time with Marc-Andre ter Stegen at Barca but the man who has already made 100 appearances for Chile and has won back-to-back Copa America titles is now ready to be a bonafide star as he enters the prime of his career.

Comfortable with the ball at his feet and a sublime shot-stopper, Bravo’s acquisition is another key moment in Guardiola’s masterplan at City.

The Spanish coach has now spent $260 million on John Stones, Leroy Sane, Ilkay Gundogan, Nolito, Marlos Moreno, Gabriel Jesus, Oleksandr Zinchenko and Bravo this summer.

Four games into Pep’s tenure as City’s boss the Citizens are perfect with four wins as they’ve qualified for the UEFA Champions League group stages.

Drinkwater stays at champion Leicester, signs 5-year deal

LONDON, ENGLAND - MAY 15:  Danny Drinkwater of Leicester City is closed down by Bertrand Traore of Chelsea during the Barclays Premier League match between Chelsea and Leicester City at Stamford Bridge on May 15, 2016 in London, England.  (Photo by Michael Regan/Getty Images)
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LEICESTER, England (AP) Danny Drinkwater has become the latest Leicester player to commit his future to the English champions.

[ MORE: Solo ban about much more ]

Leicester said Thursday the midfielder has signed a new five-year contract. Jamie Vardy and Riyad Mahrez have also penned new deals this summer.

Drinkwater, a former Manchester United player, was a regular for Leicester in its run to the Premier League title last season, helping him earn a call-up to the England squad.

Hope Solo’s ban from USWNT about much more than “coward” comments

CLEVELAND, OH - JUNE 5: Goal keeper Hope Solo #1 celebrates with Julie Johnston #8 of U.S. Women's National Team during the second half of a friendly match against Japan on June 5, 2016 at FirstEnergy Stadium in Cleveland, Ohio. (Photo by Jason Miller/Getty Images)
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On Wednesday the news broke that U.S. Soccer had banned Hope Solo for six months from the USWNT and had terminated her contract as a member of the national team.

In truth, we all saw this coming.

[ MORE: Boufal to Saints close ]

The official reason given by Sunil Gulati, president of U.S. Soccer, was that Solo’s comments following the USA’s shock defeat on penalty kicks to Sweden in the quarterfinals at Rio 2016 were “unacceptable and do not meet the standard of conduct we require from our National Team players.”

Solo, 35, said that Sweden played like “a bunch of cowards” and argued that “the best team did not win.”

Were the comments out of line? Yes. Were they in the heat of the moment? Yes. Were they worthy of a six-month suspension from the USWNT? No.

Then again, this whole episode is about far more than Solo basically lambasting Sweden for being a long-ball team. This storm has been brewing for some time with multiple incidents of indiscretion leading to this inevitable outcome.

Gulati said as much.

“Taking into consideration the past incidents involving Hope, as well as the private conversations we’ve had requiring her to conduct herself in a manner befitting a U.S. National Team member, U.S. Soccer determined this is the appropriate disciplinary action,” Gulati added in the statement.

Solo is currently locked in a legal battle with a half-sister and nephew over alleged domestic violence — Solo continues to claims she is innocent — from 2014, while there was also the incident in 2015 involving Solo and her husband, Jerramy Stevens.

The latter was arrested and charged with a DUI after he and Solo took a team mini-van from the USWNT hotel in California and drove around the streets before being pulled over outside the team hotel by police with Solo reportedly dragged from the scene kicking and screaming. Solo was banned by U.S. Soccer for 30 days on Jan. 31, 2015 for that incident but was recalled by Jill Ellis for the 2015 World Cup and was a star during the USWNT’s World Cup win.

Those two unsavory incidents coupled with the huge wave of negativity from the people of Brazil at Rio 2016 — home fans booed Solo constantly and chanted “Zika” every time she kicked the ball after she posted several pictures on social media showing her preparing for the Zika virus outbreak in Brazil — were enough for U.S. Soccer to act in this manner when Solo gave them yet another reason to investigate her.

USWNT head coach Ellis flew to Seattle with Dan Flynn, U.S. Soccer’s secretary general, to deliver the news of the suspension and although Solo will still be able to play for Seattle Reign FC in the NWSL (U.S. Soccer is reportedly handing her three months severance pay on the contract they terminated which also includes her salary for NWSL play) she will miss two upcoming games for the USWNT in 2016.

Will the USWNT be weaker without Solo? Of course they will. She has been one of the greatest players in women’s soccer history and probably the greatest-ever goalkeeper. Yet, Gulati and U.S. Soccer had to make a firm stance after giving Solo chance after chance to clean up her act.

BELO HORIZONTE, BRAZIL - AUGUST 03: Hope Solo #1 of United States looks on during the Women's Group G first round match between the United States and New Zealand during the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at Mineirao Stadium on August 3, 2016 in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. (Photo by Pedro Vilela/Getty Images)
(Photo by Pedro Vilela/Getty Images)

 

It doesn’t take a master decoder to work out the subliminal message buried in Gulati’s comments in the statement released by U.S. Soccer.

In a nutshell it says: enough is enough. You were on your last chance and you blew it. It is highly likely than since January 2015 Solo has been repeatedly warned that if she steps out of line again there would be severe consequences.

Right now Solo will not be available to play for the U.S. until Feb. 2017 and even then it seems highly unlikely she will return. After a distinguished career on the pitch, Solo’s erratic behavior off it has finally caught up with her.

The lengthy ban for her outspoken rant against Sweden was undoubtedly excessive and there is a big question mark about the notion of free speech here. She spoke her mind vehemently about her distaste towards Sweden’s tactics but it wasn’t like Solo swore or used discriminatory language when speaking about Sweden. She just didn’t agree with their tactics.

Yet, that “coward” rant was likely the final straw in a long line of indiscretions which even Solo, perhaps one day, must admit have painted both herself and U.S. Soccer in a poor light over the past few years.

Enough is enough. The punishment for this specific outburst may seem harsh to many but it likely marks the end of Solo’s glittering, controversy filled, USWNT career.

Southampton agree club-record fee of $28 million for Sofiane Boufal

Sofiane Boufal
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Southampton look set to smash their transfer record as Moroccan international Sofiane Boufal is close to sealing a move to St Mary’s.

ProSoccerTalk understands that Saints have agreed a club-record fee of $28 million with Ligue 1 club Lille for Boufal and the attacker is now discussing personal terms with the side who finished sixth in the Premier League last season.

[ MORE: Solo suspended by USWNT

It is believed there is still some way to go in the deal before Boufal, 22, is unveiled at Saints — it could be early next week ahead of the summer transfer window slamming shut at 7 p.m. ET on Aug. 31. — with the player currently in the latter stages of recovering from a knee injury he suffered at the end of last season.

With Chelsea, Tottenham, Arsenal and Liverpool all linked with Boufal in the past, this signing would represent a major coup for manager Claude Puel (former manager of Lille from 2002-08) and also boost Southampton’s attacking options following the loss of Sadio Mane and Graziano Pelle over the summer.

Boufal could be the latest in a long line of shrewd European pickups from Saints who have benefited greatly over the past three seasons from giving stars of other European leagues a chance in the PL (see: Mane, Sadio.) then selling them on to the likes of Liverpool and Manchester United for huge profits.

The Paris-born attacker shone for Lille in France’s top-flight last season, scoring 11 goals and adding four assists following his move from second-tier Angers where he came through the youth system. Born and raised in France, Boufal chose to represent Morocco at international level and he has already placed twice for the Atlas Lions after making his debut in 2016.

If the deal does get over the line, as expected, then what type of player may Southampton be getting?

Boufal has skill and trickery similar to Riyad Mahrez and the directness of a Yannick Bolasie. He can play out wide or centrally and his creativity is his main trait. That is something Saints need as they’ve scored just once in their opening two games of the season and they look to be lacking a cutting edge in the final third heading into their first-ever appearance in the group stages of the UEFA Europa League.

This could well be another masterful signing from Saints’ now famed analysts in the “black box” room at their Staplewood training ground.