German players stand in front of spectators after Germany defeated Brazil 7-1 to advance to the finals during the World Cup semifinal soccer match between Brazil and Germany at the Mineirao Stadium in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, Tuesday, July 8, 2014. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)

Brazil’s failure shouldn’t overshadow Germany’s performance

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The early leader for most common reaction after today’s result: “Brazil just weren’t that good” – five words which, in an ideal world, would go without saying. But we’re not immune to reiterating the point, too. As good as Germany was during today’s semifinal in Belo Horizonte, the host nation may have been just as bad. 7-1’s a dance that requires a partner.

Usually, that partner is a bad one. Looking back at the history of these results (one team scoring seven; winning by six-or-more), you see nations like Bolivia, Ziare, Haiti, El Salvador, Saudi Arabia, and North Korea on the losing end. Even the United States (in 1930), South Korea (1954), and Scotland (1954) make the list – all nations that would prove more competitive at future tournaments. In the 84 years of World Cup play, there’ve only been 12 games where one team scored at least seven times while conceded one or fewer.

[MORE: Germany hammer hosts Brazil 7-1 to make eighth World Cup final]
[MORE: Emotional captain David Luiz apologizes to the people of Brazil]

The big difference between most of those results and what happened today: 10 out of those 11 came in group stage or the opening round (back when the tournament was only single-elimination). Only one result comes close to today’s in terms of significance, quality of teams, and magnitude of result: Brazil’s 7-1 win over Sweden in 1950’s final four.

Obviously, a lot has changed since 1950. The soccer world is much deeper. The tournament format is completely different. Tactically,  more risk-averse styles mean fewer outlandish results.

Consider all of that before writing off what Germany’s done. Yes, Brazil’s quality may have been the main factor, but were the Selecao really history-making bad by themselves? Where they Zaire in 1974 bad? Or as poor as Saudi Arabia in 2002? Were they so bad that we should completely discount Germany’s contributions?

Perhaps, but there’s a far more likely story. A team with David Luiz, Dante, Luiz Gustavo, Fernandinho, and Júlio César may have a bad day, but they’d have to reach unexpected lows to match the South Korea team of 1954. And while it’s possible the defensive form the team’s first five games (four goals allowed) was a complete lie, that lie would have to be a huge one to say the team, on its own, was also capable of a performance that rivaled North Korea’s in 2010.

The more likely story is that the finishing we saw from Miroslav Klose, Toni Kroos, and Andre Schürrle played a huge part. The quality in the middle we saw from Kroos and Sami Khedira was also a factor, as were the talents of players like Philipp Lahm, Thömas Müller, Mats Hummels and, early in the second half, Manuel Neuer.

[MORE: Talking points after Germany’s rout of Brazil]
[MORE: Brazil boss Luis Felipe Scolari takes blame for huge defeat: “I am responsible”]

As the score says, Brazil were terrible, but that score also implies they were playing an extremely good team — a team which, since before the 2010 World Cup, people have projected to grow into one of the world’s dominant sides. Tonight may have been our first glimpse of that potential being actualized. Maybe, as bad as Brazil were, they needed to play against a great team to be part of a historic result.

Whether Germany really is a great team, well, that’s where we can get too carried away with what’s happened. That’s where the backlash will come. Right now, there’s a 60-minute stretch that says Germany can be great. With their ascendance has been predicted for some time, their larger body of work doesn’t touch this level.

But for that 60 minutes in the middle of today’s game, Germany were certainly great — undeniably so. They were great in a way not even Brazil’s terrible day could fully overshadow.

How will USMNT line up vs. Mexico in CONCACAF Cup?

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You probably don’t need reminding, but just in case you do, the U.S. national team face Mexico in a huge one-off CONCACAF Cup game on Saturday at the Pasadena Rose Bowl.

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The winner will represent CONCACAF at the 2017 Confederations Cup in Russia as Jurgen Klinsmann’s USMNT side are the underdogs against El Tri.

With plenty of struggles and a hangover from the 2015 Gold Cup failure, Klinsmann is under pressure and getting his team selection spot on will be crucial if the USA are going to get past Mexico in front of over 90,000 fans at the Rose Bowl.

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Below I suggest three possible starting lineups, then give my conclusion on how I think the U.S. will lineup.

Let us know if you agree by posting your own lineups in the comments section below.

JPW’s choice

—– Guzan —–

— Johnson — Cameron — Besler — Ream —

Jones —– Bradley

— Bedoya — Dempsey — Zardes —

—– Altidore —–

Mix-and-match XI

—– Howard —–

— Cameron — Besler — Ream — Beasley —

—– Williams —–

— Yedlin — Bradley — Zusi —

— Altidore — Zardes —

Stopping Mexico

—– Howard —–

— Johnson — Besler — Ream — Beasley —

—– Cameron —–

— Dempsey — Williams — Bradley — Jones —

— Altidore —


I think Klinsmann’s choice is the way to go, although Tim Howard‘s presence in goal over Brad Guzan would certainly help strengthen the USA’s defense. A center back pairing of Cameron and Besler must happen, while having Johnson in at right back will be a boost and Ream’s size may see him get the nod over Beasely but the veteran is likely to start if fit. In midfield I’d go with Jones and Bradley sitting in front of othe back four and then that would allow, Zardes, Bedoya and Dempsey to support Altidore up top.

The final selection is ultra-defensive, but given the form of his team and Mexico’s attacking talents, Klinsmann may start more defensive and then change tact as the game goes on. Having all of your most-experienced players on the pitch will prove vital to succeeding at the Rose Bowl, therefore, even though the Mix-and-Match XI looks speedy and is dangerous, I’d expect to see “JPW’s choice” or “Stopping Mexico” to be more like the starting lineup on Saturday.

“Legends World Cup” hope to bring Beckham, Zidane to Mexico

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David Beckham and Zinedine Zidane coaxed out of retirement to play in a “Legends World Cup” you say?

Well, that got my attention.

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According to an interview with the BBC’s world service, the organizers of the 2017 Legends World Cup are hoping to entice both Becks and Zizou to roll back the years and represent their nations in Mexico.

Beckham, 40, and Zidane, 43, are already putting their boots back on to captain a Great Britain and Ireland XI vs. a World XI for a friendly at Old Trafford on November 14 to raise money for UNICEF, and former Mexico goalkeeper Jorge Campos, 48, has urged the duo to take part in the tournament in 2017 where he will coach Mexico’s team.

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From the BBC:

“I want to see Zinedine Zidane, David Beckham, Brazilian Ronaldo,” said Campos, 48, the flamboyant ex-Mexico goalkeeper who will coach his country.

“Everybody wants to see Argentina’s Diego Maradona, but he can’t play. He’s too old.”

The tournament is scheduled to take place at the beginning of 2017, with 12 teams in total — four from the Americas, six from Europe and one each from Africa and Asia — taking part.

Given the age (players must be aged between 35-45) and caliber of the players Campos and Co. are trying to recruit, let’s have a think about who would play for the U.S.

Landon Donovan and Brian McBride up front? Brad Friedel in goal? Let us know who would make the squad.