German players stand in front of spectators after Germany defeated Brazil 7-1 to advance to the finals during the World Cup semifinal soccer match between Brazil and Germany at the Mineirao Stadium in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, Tuesday, July 8, 2014. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)

Brazil’s failure shouldn’t overshadow Germany’s performance

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The early leader for most common reaction after today’s result: “Brazil just weren’t that good” – five words which, in an ideal world, would go without saying. But we’re not immune to reiterating the point, too. As good as Germany was during today’s semifinal in Belo Horizonte, the host nation may have been just as bad. 7-1’s a dance that requires a partner.

Usually, that partner is a bad one. Looking back at the history of these results (one team scoring seven; winning by six-or-more), you see nations like Bolivia, Ziare, Haiti, El Salvador, Saudi Arabia, and North Korea on the losing end. Even the United States (in 1930), South Korea (1954), and Scotland (1954) make the list – all nations that would prove more competitive at future tournaments. In the 84 years of World Cup play, there’ve only been 12 games where one team scored at least seven times while conceded one or fewer.

[MORE: Germany hammer hosts Brazil 7-1 to make eighth World Cup final]
[MORE: Emotional captain David Luiz apologizes to the people of Brazil]

The big difference between most of those results and what happened today: 10 out of those 11 came in group stage or the opening round (back when the tournament was only single-elimination). Only one result comes close to today’s in terms of significance, quality of teams, and magnitude of result: Brazil’s 7-1 win over Sweden in 1950’s final four.

Obviously, a lot has changed since 1950. The soccer world is much deeper. The tournament format is completely different. Tactically,  more risk-averse styles mean fewer outlandish results.

Consider all of that before writing off what Germany’s done. Yes, Brazil’s quality may have been the main factor, but were the Selecao really history-making bad by themselves? Where they Zaire in 1974 bad? Or as poor as Saudi Arabia in 2002? Were they so bad that we should completely discount Germany’s contributions?

Perhaps, but there’s a far more likely story. A team with David Luiz, Dante, Luiz Gustavo, Fernandinho, and Júlio César may have a bad day, but they’d have to reach unexpected lows to match the South Korea team of 1954. And while it’s possible the defensive form the team’s first five games (four goals allowed) was a complete lie, that lie would have to be a huge one to say the team, on its own, was also capable of a performance that rivaled North Korea’s in 2010.

The more likely story is that the finishing we saw from Miroslav Klose, Toni Kroos, and Andre Schürrle played a huge part. The quality in the middle we saw from Kroos and Sami Khedira was also a factor, as were the talents of players like Philipp Lahm, Thömas Müller, Mats Hummels and, early in the second half, Manuel Neuer.

[MORE: Talking points after Germany’s rout of Brazil]
[MORE: Brazil boss Luis Felipe Scolari takes blame for huge defeat: “I am responsible”]

As the score says, Brazil were terrible, but that score also implies they were playing an extremely good team — a team which, since before the 2010 World Cup, people have projected to grow into one of the world’s dominant sides. Tonight may have been our first glimpse of that potential being actualized. Maybe, as bad as Brazil were, they needed to play against a great team to be part of a historic result.

Whether Germany really is a great team, well, that’s where we can get too carried away with what’s happened. That’s where the backlash will come. Right now, there’s a 60-minute stretch that says Germany can be great. With their ascendance has been predicted for some time, their larger body of work doesn’t touch this level.

But for that 60 minutes in the middle of today’s game, Germany were certainly great — undeniably so. They were great in a way not even Brazil’s terrible day could fully overshadow.

Report: David Silva out 2-3 weeks with ligament damage

LOGRONO, SPAIN - OCTOBER 09:  David Silva of Spain is fouled by Lars Gerson of Luxembourg during the UEFA EURO 2016 Qualifier group C match between Spain and Luxembourg at Estadio Municipal Las Gaunas on October 9, 2015 in Logrono, Spain.  (Photo by Denis Doyle/Getty Images)
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Despite sitting at the top of the table in the Premier League, things are not going well for Manchester City.

Star striker and leading goalscorer Sergio Aguero suffered a torn hamstring while playing for Argentina, and now he is joined by David Silva on the injured list.

Silva lasted nine minutes in Spain’s EURO qualifying match against Luxembourg, forced off after taking a bad challenge from behind. Silva went down in pain and tried to play on, but asked for a substitution just minutes later.

[ RELATED: Alejandro Bedoya to miss USMNT vs. Mexico ]

Spanish news outlet AS is reporting that Silva has suffered “lateral internal ligament damage in his right ankle,” and could face 2-3 weeks on the sidelines.

With Aguero set to miss at least a month, Silva’s injury could leave Manchester City without two of their top players in the coming weeks.

Silva has arguably been the best player in the Premier League this season, the quarterback of the City attack, which has scored a league-leading 19 goals through eight matches.

City travels to Old Trafford for the Manchester derby on October 25, which falls into that 2-3 week range for Silva’s recovery. In a match that could decide who sits top of the table, Manuel Pellegrini would be very shorthanded without Silva and Aguero.

Alejandro Bedoya to miss USMNT vs. Mexico

GLASGOW,  SCOTLAND - NOVEMBER 15 :  Alejandro Bedoya of USA  in action during the International Friendly match between Scotland and USA at Hampden Park on November 15, 2013.  (Photo by Mark Runnacles/Getty Images)
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Alejandro Bedoya will not feature for the United States in the CONCACAF playoff against Mexico on Saturday, and has been replaced on the roster by Bobby Wood.

Bedoya traveled to Los Angeles from his club team Nantes in France, but Jurgen Klinsmann has announced he will be unable to play after falling ill.

[ FOLLOW: All of PST’s USMNT coverage ]

Without Bedoya, Union Berlin midfielder Bobby Wood has been added to the USMNT side. Wood scored the first two goals of his international career this summer in wins over the Netherlands and Germany, and has scored four goals in ten matches for Union Berlin this season. Wood has been training with the U.S. camp throughout the week for the upcoming friendly against Costa Rica.

Bedoya has played well for the USMNT, discounting his short performance against Brazil in September. In that match, Klinsmann played Bedoya out of position against a potent Brazil attack, and he was substituted before halftime. However, playing in his more natural role as a winger or attacking midfielder, many believed Bedoya could be in line for a start against Mexico.