Vladimir Putin

Most expensive ever: Putin to spend $20 billion on 2018 World Cup in Russia


One of the VIP guests invited to the 2014 World Cup final in Rio de Janeiro on Sunday is already planning for the next tournament in Russia four years from now.

Big time.

Russian President Vladimir Putin, who will attend the final by invitation along with many other leading politicians, is ready to splash some serious cash when it comes to hosting the World Cup for the first-time in his nations history. Putin and members of the Kremlin are planning to spend over $20 BILLION on hosting the showpiece event, as costs for new stadiums, infrastructure and transport links will be hefty. Putin will be up for reelection in 2018 and could see hosting the World Cup as a great tool to rally public support behind him.

The latest report comes from NBCNews.com, as Putin aims to make the 2018 tournament the most-expensive and extravagant World Cup in history.

“Russian President Vladimir Putin reportedly plans to spend $20 billion on Russia’s hosting of the 2018 competition. His ambitious plan will see stadiums and infrastructure built over an area stretching 1,500 miles from the Baltic Sea in the west to the Ural Mountains that form the gateway to Asia. The event is expected to follow the economic blueprint of this year’s Sochi Winter Games – the most expensive Olympics in history with estimated overall price tag of $51 billion.”

Putting the reported budget for the 2018 tournament into context, the 2014 World Cup in Brazil reportedly cost over $14 billion, while South Africa 2010 came in at $3.9 billion. That means the money Russia will spending on the 2018 World Cup is five-times the amount that was spent in South Africa. Wowza.

The 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi were deemed a success in Russia, as Putin spent an incredible $51 billion on the event to make it the most expensive Olympics in history. The event was safe, delivered what was expected but now Sochi has no need for the stadiums, hotels and other infrastructure built for the games. In the bigger cities like Moscow and St. Petersburg, improving soccer stadiums and transport will prove beneficial, but in some of the more remote World Cup cities in Russia spending is badly needed on other things. Will “White Elephants” be left behind all over Russia when the tournament has finished? Or will the Russian people benefit from this monumental expenditure on World Cup stadiums and facilities?

That remains to be seen. Putin’s plans may be grand, but they should improve the country for the long-term, not just dazzle during a World Cup, then dissolve into dereliction.

EURO 2016: Who’s headed to France?

PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC - OCTOBER 10: Volkan Sen of Turkey in action during the UEFA EURO 2016 Group A Qualifier match between Czech Republic and Turkey at Letna Stadium on October 10, 2015 in Prague, Czech Republic. (Photo by Matej Divizna/Getty Images)
Getty Images
Leave a comment

The group stage of qualification is complete, as 20 teams have clinched a berth at EURO 2016, which kicks off next summer in France.

The top-two finishers in each group automatically qualified, as did the best third-place side out of all the groups (Turkey). France qualified automatically as the host nation.

[ MORE: EURO 2016 roundup ]

That leaves eight third-place teams to battle for the final four spots through a play-off. The draw for the matchups will take place on October 18, and those matches will be held from November 12-17 as a home-and-home play-off.

Group A

  1. Czech Republic
  2. Iceland
  3. Turkey (automatically qualified as best third-place side)

Group B

  1. Belgium
  2. Wales
  3. Bosnia and Herzegovina (qualified for play-off)

Group C

  1. Spain
  2. Slovakia
  3. Ukraine (qualified for play-off)

Group D

  1. Germany
  2. Poland
  3. Republic of Ireland (qualified for play-off)

Group E

  1. England
  2. Switzerland
  3. Slovenia (qualified for play-off)

Group F

  1. Northern Ireland
  2. Romania
  3. Hungary (qualified for play-off)

Group G

  1. Austria
  2. Russia
  3. Sweden (qualified for play-off)

Group H

  1. Italy
  2. Croatia
  3. Norway (qualified for play-off)

Group I

  1. Portugal
  2. Albania
  3. Denmark (qualified for play-off)

EURO 2016: Dutch disaster as Netherlands fail to qualify

AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS - OCTOBER 13:  Robin van Persie of the Netherlands (19) reacts during the UEFA EURO 2016 qualifying Group A match between the Netherlands and the Czech Republic at Amsterdam Arena on October 13, 2015 in Amsterdam, Netherlands.  (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
Getty Images
Leave a comment

The group stage of qualifying for the 2016 European Championship has come to a close, and one of the top teams in the world will not be playing in France next summer.

Netherlands 2-3 Czech Republic

The Netherlands finished second at the 2010 World Cup and third at the 2014 World Cup, but have failed to qualify for EURO 2016. Playing in front of a home crowd in a must-win match against the Czech Republic, the Dutch got off to a dreadful start, falling behind 2-0 as manager Danny Blind was forced to make a substitution within the opening 40 minutes. The Czech Republic was sent to ten men before the break, but an own-goal from Robin Van Persie made it 3-0 as the Dutch couldn’t recover. A disastrous result for the Netherlands, as big changes will surely come from the top down.

[ RELATED: David de Gea fighting for starting goalkeeper position with Spain ]

Italy 2-1 Norway

Italy finishes atop Group H without a loss after defeating Norway 2-1 today. Norway took the lead through Norwich City’s Alexander Tettey, but late goals from Alessandro Florenzi and Southampton’s Graziano Pelle gave the Italians all three points.

Malta 0-1 Croatia

With Norway’s loss, Croatia jumped into second place in Group H and secured qualification to EURO 2016 with a 1-0 win away at Malta. Inter Milan’s Ivan Perisic scored the game’s only goal, as Croatia advances despite having one point deducted due to inappropriate actions from their fans.

Elsewhere in EURO qualifying

Group A

Turkey 1-0 Iceland
Latvia 0-1 Kazakhstan

Group B

Belgium 3-1 Israel
Wales 2-0 Andorra
Cyprus 2-3 Bosnia and Herzegovina

Group H

Bulgaria 2-0 Azerbaijan