Spain v Netherlands: Group B - 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil

Ten biggest surprise failures of the World Cup


While it would be easy to type up a three word post that reveals “Spain and England” upon clicking the headline, we’re talking about players here.

While Neymar, Lionel Messi and Robin van Persie lived up to the hype, plenty of players performed well below their pay grade.

So who makes our list of the 10 biggest surprise failures of the World Cup?

[ MORE from our 2014 World Cup review ]

10. Michael Bradley, United States — The Yanks best player simply wasn’t during the tournament. His relentless effort is to be applauded (and expected) and his career is far from cooked, but there’s little doubt that Bradley didn’t live up to expectations in Brazil.

9. Sergio Aguero, Argentina — He may have been hurt, but the Manchester City forward still played 313 minutes without a goal or assist (recording just two solo runs into the area).

8. Igor Akinfeev, Russia — Even if you buy into a green laser pointer being responsible for his allowing Algeria’s only goal in a 1-1 draw, Akinfeev almost carried Lee Keun-ho’s shot into the net in a draw against South Korea. This was neither a strong nor emblematic showcase of a very good goalkeeper.

7. Steven Gerrard, England — There’s no debating that England’s captain has enjoyed a fantastic career, but he had a hand in both of Uruguay’s goals in the match that proved to be the Three Lions’ undoing. Not that anyone outside of Gary Cahill, Wayne Rooney and Daniel Sturridge had much of a tournament for England, but still.

6. Luis Suarez, Uruguay — by sinking his teeth into Giorgio Chiellini, earning a place away from the team for the duration of the tournament. But he still overcame a big injury to silence England. For this, he drops to 6.

5. Alex Song, Cameroon —  When match-fixing allegations are created around your nation’s entire tournament and the pinnacle is your absolutely unnecessary red card from an elbow-thrust into an opponent’s back, you’ve sufficiently embarrassed yourself. Alex, we’re talking to you.

4. Pepe, Portugal — Pregame speech to Pepe before the Germany match (translated from Portuguese), “Alright, Peps. We gotta have the match of our lives today. Don’t let that antagonist Mueller get into your head. Whatever you do, don’t do a Pepe. DON’T DO A PEPE.” Thirty-seven minutes later, he did a Pepe. His red card for head butting Mueller was arguably the difference between Portugal drawing/beating the U.S. a few days later.

3. Diego Costa, Spain — Perhaps it was the pressure of playing in Brazil after spurning the nation, but he was horrific. Fortunately for Chelsea fans, there’s evidence to back up the theory that this was an aberration.

2. Hulk, Brazil — The 27-year-old Zenit striker failed to score in the tournament, and could not step up in the absence of Neymar. At times his positioning was as poor as possible.

1. Iker Casillas, Spain — Honestly, Casillas looked like a kid playing his first international game, not a man who has started a combined 830-plus games between Spain and Real Madrid. Some of the goals weren’t just lapses, they were howlers.

Jurgen Klopp announced as new Liverpool manager

Jurgen Klopp, Liverpool FC
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Enough with the speculation and reports already, because it’s finally officially official: Jurgen Klopp has been appointed the newest manager of Liverpool Football Club, the Merseyside club announced on Thursday.

[ FOLLOW: All of PST’s PL coverage ]

Klopp will be unveiled to the world at an introductory press conference at Anfield on Friday.

According to early reports, Klopp’s three-year contract could pay him as much as $10 million per season.

[ QUOTE KING: Top 10 “Klopp-isms” from his time at Dortmund ]

The 48-year-old German has been out of work since stepping down at Bundesliga side Borussia Dortmund following a seventh-place finish to the 2014-15 season. Klopp’s seven seasons in charge of Dortmund weren’t without success and silverware, though, as he led Der BVB to back-to-back league titles in 2011 and 2012, a German Cup triumph in 2012 and a UEFA Champions League final appearance in 2013.

PST’s Joe Prince-Wright will be at Anfield on Friday for Klopp’s unveiling, so be sure to follow JPW on Twitter and check back to PST for wall-to-wall coverage of Klopp’s first press conference as Liverpool manager.

Mourinho “working like never before” to turn Chelsea around

Jose Mourinho, Chelsea FC
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Jose Mourinho got the dreaded much-needed vote of confidence from Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich last weekend, seemingly giving the Portuguese manager a temporary stay of execution despite the Blues’ worst start to a season in 37 years.

[ FOLLOW: All of PST’s PL coverage ]

Speaking this week, Mourinho has revealed that while he’s thankful to have been kept on at the club for which he regularly professes his love, he still thinks it was no-brainer for Abramovich. In other words, Mourinho’s not backing down from his incredible, seven-minute rant to one question following Saturday’s defeat to Southampton.

Mourinho, on what he’s doing to turn Chelsea around — quotes from the Guardian:

“It shows the confidence of Abramovich in the manager who has won three Premier League titles with this club. I thank him and I keep working.

“What’s going on? I do not know. The results with Chelsea at the moment have been really bad. I cannot hide that reality, and I don’t want to. And I struggle to find an explanation. But I assure you: I’m working like never before and we will come out of this. And there is also the Champions League that we will not neglect, for certain.”

What did you expect from Mourinho? Well, you know, I should probably be fired, but thanks to Mr. Abramovich for not realizing this and keeping me employed? It’s simultaneously interesting and the least surprising thing ever, though, that Mourinho claims to not know what’s wrong with Chelsea at the moment. Of course he has a theory (or five), and of course he’s “working like never before” to correct it.

[ MORE: Ozil, Coquelin say Arsenal can win the title this season ]

The most fascinating thing about Chelsea’s sluggish start to the season is to see, hear and read Mourinho speaking from a position of powerlessness. Always the clever one, the one dictating where the discussion goes, the one in charge of every press interaction, Saturday’s rant felt like watching a desperate Mourinho grasping for anything by which to pull himself back up.