Three thoughts about Aurélien Collin’s now rescinded red card

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Sporting Kansas City’s Aurélien Collin saw straight red on Wednesday night against the Columbus Crew, a decision that was overturned today after the club’s appeal. You can see the play, above.

Collin will now be eligible to play tomorrow against the visiting Galaxy, though Edvin Jurisvic did cost him 35 minutes in Wednesday’s match. Though Sporting still won the game, 2-1, the dismissal still left us with three thoughts about the decision’s causes, implications:

1.)  Collin’s reputation

Coming into the season, Aurélien Collin’s three years in Major League Soccer had featured 31 yellow cards but only one dismissal. This year, that’s changed. Maybe the odds are catching up to the physical rearguard, but after an astounding 2013 with 15 yellows and zero reds, Collin’s been dismissed twice in 2014. Other the last nine games, Collin’s tripled his number of career red cards.

So what’s going on here? Obviously, a mistake. At least, that’s what caused the most recent red card, but seeing why Collin was given his marching orders, you wonder if the Sporting defender is being subjected to some heightened scrutiny. Is that record of yellow cards drawing more attention to Collin’s defending.

In fairness to the officials, “more attention” has been a theme throughout the season. Across the league, we’re seen red cards handed out somewhat liberally, phenomena that’s led to a slew of lopsided and “wow, that changed quick” results (such as when Collin was dismissed at New England earlier this year).

source: Getty Images
Collin accumulated 15 yellows without a red last season. This year, he’s been dismissed twice, though the second red was overturned. (Source: Getty Images)

Perhaps Collin’s aggressive approach doesn’t fit as well in this new, hyper-critical MLS. Or maybe this is just a phase – an anomalous span, after which Collin will go back to his line-walking ways. Regardless, the KC defender’s reputation for testing officials may a part of this equation.

After Wednesday’s decision, I wonder: Was Collin being judged on play or repute? I think it’s the former, but I’m keeping my mind open to the latter.

2.) MLS is still way ahead of the game on this

An official screwed up. Kansas City appealed. The call was reversed. While the team doesn’t get to replay those last 35, it doesn’t matter. Sporting still won, and after the independent review panel upheld their appeal, they’ll get Collin back for tomorrow’s showcase against the visiting Galaxy.

It almost goes without saying, but after a World Cup where the rest of the world marveled at vanishing spray (while at one time questioning the accuracy of goal-line technology), some perspective is nice: Major League Soccer’s willingness to redress these mistakes leaves the league far ahead of most on this issue.

Rather than sit back and wax philosophically about the sanctity of each match, MLS is being proactive, a process that involves confessing the obvious: Officials are fallible. But instead of adopting a quixiotic approach that romanticizes the value of those imperfections, MLS is saying they can address issues, offer a solution, and provide some negative feedback to the process. They’ve implemented a process by which they can evolve.

Unfortunately, that prompts the next question; or, to look at it another way, the next stage of the process:

3.)  How to make it better

This may not be something MLS can snap their fingers and implement, but a solution will happen one day. At some point in the future, people are going to demand a real-time fix to such obvious errors, and while there’s always concern for “flow of the game,” there are two situations were a quick, off-field review can happen, providing a solution that would respect the game’s flow.

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Goal-line technology was used for the first time at this summer’s World Cup.

That’s because on penalty kicks and red cards, the game’s already stopped, usually for 60 or 120 seconds. Given how much matches change in those situations, there’s a huge incentive to get those calls right, even if it means adding a little more time to that stoppage.

In a world where each MLS game is streamed online, where the World Cup showed how easy and elegant you can communicate with the lead official, having a centralized review (a la what the NBA is implementing) just isn’t that hard. When everybody on Twitter is able to review controversial calls within seconds, it makes too much sense to ask the league to do so, too.

This isn’t about making a throw-in last forever. It isn’t about getting endlessly scrutinizing every little midfield infraction. It’s about asking “where would extra review be reasonable?” Given how the importance of dismissals and penalties (and the state of the technology), it’s more unreasonable to give in to an antiquated view about how high-level soccer should be played.

Whether this is issue needs to go through FIFA or IFAB, I don’t know. Sometimes, it’s unclear where those lines are drawn (or, are enforced). Regardless, this feels like implementing substitutions, or moving toward goal-line technology – controversies at which history will scoff.

If tradition-steeped sports like baseball, cricket, and tennis have a place for in-game technology, soccer can get there, too.

Sweden announces Zlatan Ibrahimovic will not return for World Cup

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Zlatan Ibrahimovic‘s public flirtation and seeming committal to returning to the Swedish national team for the World Cup was a big tease.

Whether it’s his call or not is up for debate.

The Swedish Football Association reports that it’s spoken with Ibrahimovic and the 35-year-old LA Galaxy striker has declined the chance to return to the fold.

[ MORE: Fulham, NFL owner to buy Wembley? ]

Sweden’s sporting director Lars Richt says Ibrahimovic has not changed his mind on international retirement despite his own words.

Sweden’s current team may have a role in that.

We imagine Richt and Sweden may be cushioning the blow for Ibrahimovic, especially if national team goalkeeper Karl-Johan Johnsson is speaking on behalf of a team vibe when he speaks of Zlatan being “an individualist” who could ruin Sweden’s team-first concept.

Report: Fulham, NFL owner Khan agrees $700m price for Wembley

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Fulham owner Shad Khan also owns a National Football League team, and could have two top-flight teams from different nations playing in England soon.

For Fulham, the Cottagers are currently very much in the race for automatic promotion to the Premier League and at the least will have a chance at qualifying through the playoffs.

[ MORE: TFC loses CCL Final in PKs ]

For the Jaguars, who have rarely needed all the seats in their stadium, it could mean a move to London if Khan goes through with what’s being reported as an accepted $700 million bid to buy Wembley Stadium.

Tottenham Hotspur’s new stadium was also built with the design to host NFL games.

Here’s how ProFootballTalk’s Michael David Smith puts a bow on it (on one of the biggest days of the NFL calendar, nonetheless):

So it’s possible that there could soon be two iconic soccer stadiums in London with strong NFL ties, one which was built with NFL games in mind, and another that is owned by an NFL owner. The league is pouring serious resources into London.

It seems unlikely Khan would move Fulham from Craven Cottage, but there are other repercussions of this move for soccer in England.

There’s the potential for the England national team to no longer utlizie a permanent home, and the FA Cup and League Cup both potentially requiring new or rotating venues for their final rounds.

A lot to monitor here, and we’ll surely have all the details as they emerge from Khan’s crew.

TFC on CCL loss: “Feels the heart has been ripped from the chest”

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Michael Bradley went 90 minutes at center back, Jozy Altidore and Sebastian Giovinco scored, and Toronto FC nearly, oh-so-nearly, became the first Major League Soccer side to win a continental title in the CONCACAF Champions League era.

[ MORE: Match recap ]

“We wanted to be the first (MLS side) to lift the CONCACAF Champions League trophy,” said goalkeeper Alex Bono, according to MLSSoccer.com. “We failed in that goal; that’s massively disappointing. … This is the way the game goes, it’s unjust; it feels the heart has been ripped from the chest sometimes.”

Bono made some big saves in regulation as TFC flipped its 2-1 first leg loss on its ear over 90 minutes, but Chivas Guadalajara scored all four of their penalty kick attempts as Jonathan Osorio hit the bar and Bradley set his effort on a path to the moon.

That part was possibly academic, as Chivas could’ve sealed it with their fifth penalty, but Marky Delgado’s miss of a perfect Sebastian Giovinco stoppage time cross is what sent the match into kicks.

Here’s how The Toronto Sun’s Kurt Larson framed his post-match interview with Delgado, described as one of the few players not to walk past the media after the loss:

“That’s football sometimes,” Delgado searched for words. “Sometimes you win. Sometimes you don’t. Sometimes it goes in. Sometimes it doesn’t. It’s heartbreaking.”

It felt cruel to keep him standing there any longer.

“Wherever we are, we want to win,” the soft-spoken American said. “Unfortunately today we didn’t, but we know we dominated the game.”

And Bradley, in the season after Toronto won a trouble but also 18 months removed from missing a PK in the MLS Cup Final — not to mention marshaling the USMNT midfield in its monumental failure to qualify for the World Cup was mostly good in playing out-of-position.

“In the biggest moments, we threw caution to the wind and played with balls, bravery, and pride in ourselves, in each other, in our club and our city,” Bradley said on Canadian television outlet TSN.

They did, and now they must hope to win the Canadian Championship, MLS Supporters’ Shield, or MLS Cup to get another shot at qualifying for the Club World Cup.

Toronto loses CONCACAF Champions League in PKs

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Chivas Guadalajara scored on all of its penalty kicks to clinch a berth in the CONCACAF Champions League Final, breaking the hearts of Toronto FC in Mexico on Wednesday and earning a berth in the 2018 Club World Cup.

Sebastian Giovinco and Jozy Altidore scored in regulation as Toronto FC picked up a 2-1 win to reverse their first leg loss and push it to kicks.

Orbelin Pineda scored Chivas’ goal.

Hometown kid Jonathan Osorio hit the cross bar on Toronto’s second PK and Michael Bradley sent the fifth offering into outer space.

[ MORE: Bayern 1-2 Real Madrid ]

Toronto flew out of the gates, and Rodolfo Cota came flying off his line to deny Altidore a 10th minute chance.

Alex Bono collected a header off a Chivas corner kick earned by a counterattack.

Pineda then made Toronto’s task even harder with a 19th minute goal, cooking Auro’s mark to reach a through ball and dancing around Bono for 1-0.

But Altidore was somehow unmarked for Nic Hasler’s pass despite five Chivas defenders and Cota inside the six-yard box, and TFC leveled the second leg at 1.

And TFC got the next goal through Giovinco, slipped through by Marky Delgado and taking advantage of a yard of space and a second to shoot with his fourth goal of the CCL knockout rounds.

The Reds kept coming in the second half, with Delgado winning a big 50-50 ball deep in Chivas territory and Victor Vasquez ripping a shot that Cota dove to smother.

Chivas found its footing in 58th minute, sending a shot over the bar before Jesus Godinez hit the post in the 61st (though his dive seemingly had the near post covered). Bono the next knocked a free kick over the bar from a similar position as the ball that beat him in the first leg.

Javier Lopez curled a vicious attempt just over the goal in the 72nd. He’d have the next best chances moments after Altidore subbed off with an apparent hamstring injury, but dribbled onto Bono’s lap and fired off the keeper.

Giovinco worked a 1-2 with Osorio and cruised a shot just wide of the far post in the 87th minute. Delgado then mailed a sitter over the bar in the first minute of stoppage time.