Premier League 2014-15 preview: Manchester City

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In a 2013-14 season where Liverpool, Chelsea and Arsenal all enjoyed form blitzes that saw them go top of the table it was the steady approach of Manchester City that proved vital to their title hoist. That directive perfectly reflects the persona of manager Manuel Pellegrini – calm, pragmatic, calculating and unflappable.

But while most top squads set out each summer to inject new life into the squad and prevent the dreaded plateau, City have spent little in this transfer window. Part of that conservative stance has been due to the $82 million Financial Fair Play restriction imposed by UEFA but the other part is that this squad is already loaded. At least, that’s what City fans hope when talk of a title repeat surfaces.

[Related: Full PL season preview]

Transfers In: Fernando ($20 million from Porto), Willy Caballero ($11 million from Malaga), Bacary Sagna (free from Arsenal), Bruno Zuculini ($3.3 million from Racing Club), Frank Lampard (loan from NYCFC)

Transfers Out: Gareth Barry ($3 million to Everton), Costel Pantilimon (free to Sunderland), Jack Rodwell ($16 million to Sunderland), Joleon Lescott (free to West Brom)

Last Season: City rode the steady wave to the finish, outlasting challenges from Liverpool and Chelsea to claim their second title in three years. Repeats are never easy but City is a squad with few holes.

source: Getty ImagesStar Player: Yaya Toure

An absolute monster in the midfield, Toure’s fabulous career hit its highest point last season when he scored an incredible 20 league goals on the way to leading City to their third title in two years. A major reason for this landmark season was the added presence of Fernandinho as Toure’s partner in the holding role. With the Brazilian preferring to hang back and defend, Toure had the freedom to play in a more advanced role where his linkups with David Silva formed the playmaking moments that devastated opponents and helped City to score 102 league goals in 2013-14.

This season, the Citizens hopes will once again bank on the health and form of the Ivorian. North of 30 years old now, Toure is likely to be used more sparingly by the ever-wise Manuel Pellegrini. His presence in big league matches and Champions League contests is a must but against lesser league opponents and early round League and FA Cup matches, expect the Chilean manager to hand some reps to Javi Garcia and new boy Fernando.

Coach’s Corner: Manuel Pellegrini

The soundbites, mind-games and touchline actions of Jose Mourinho dominate the headlines but Pellegrini deserves massive credit for what he’s done at City. Claiming a title as a first year manager in the Premier League is unheard of but the Chilean did it with modesty and grace. In Year Two he’ll be handed an even greater challenge – trying to repeat. How he’ll do it remains a mystery but it’s time the rest of the league take more note of the man who holds his cards tight.

PST Predicts: No doubt City once again will challenge for the Premier League title but the club also will have its sites set on the Champions League. Dedication to one competition often means neglect to another but the die-hards in sky blue will feel this squad is built to do the double. Doubt them at your own peril.

Premier League player Power Rankings – Week 2

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For the second time in the 2017-18 Premier League season we rank the form players and, somewhat predictably, there are plenty of new entries and lots of chopping and changing in our rankings.

[ MORE: Power Rankings archive ]

Remember: this is a list of the top 20 performing players right now in the Premier League.

Let us know in the comments section below if you agree with the selections of the top 20 players in the PL right now.


  1. Paul Pogba (Man United) – New entry
  2. Romelu Lukaku (Man United) – Down 1
  3. David Luiz (Chelsea) – New entry
  4. Javier Hernandez (West Ham) – New entry
  5. Wayne Rooney (Everton) – New entry
  6. Sadio Mane (Liverpool) – Up 2
  7. David Silva (Man City) – Down 3
  8. Henrikh Mkhitaryan (Man United) – New entry
  9. Aaron Mooy (Huddersfield) – Up 7
  10. Riyad Mahrez (Leicester City) – New entry
  11. Marcos Alonso (Chelsea) – New entry
  12. Alexandre Lacazette (Arsenal) – Down 7
  13. Willian (Chelsea) – New entry
  14. Steve Mounie (Huddersfield) – Down 12
  15. Manolo Gabbiadini (Southampton) – New entry
  16. Dele Alli (Tottenham) – Down 9
  17. Jordan Pickford (Everton) – New entry
  18. Harry Maguire (Leicester City) – New entry
  19. Mohamed Salah (Liverpool) – Down 9
  20. Anthony Martial (Man United) – New entry

Men In Blazers pod: Chelsea, Man United, Rooney all feature

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Rog and Davo break down Chelsea’s win at Tottenham’s footballing Airbnb, Wembley. Plus, another 4-0 win for Manchester United. And Wayne Rooney scores in Everton’s 1-1 draw with Manchester City.

All of the MiB content — pods, videos and stories can be seen here, but to really stay in touch, follow, subscribe, click here:

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VIDEO: A sneak peek of Everton’s Europa League journey – Part 1

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Everton’s UEFA Europa League adventure continues on Thursday as Ronald Koeman‘s side travel to Croatia to face Hajduk Split in the second leg of their playoff.

[ MORE: Live Europa League scores

Leading 2-0 from the first leg at Goodison Park last week the Toffees are one game away from returning to the Europa League group stage for the first time since 2014-15.

In 2017-18 Everton have already had a home and away series against MFK Ruzomberok which they negotiated easily with two 1-0 wins, and Everton have shared behind-the-scenes footage with us from those two encounters in late July and early August.

Click play on the video above to get a taste of what Everton faced in the tiny Slovakian town of Ruzomberok in Part 1 of this videos series.

Part 2 will arrive at Pro Soccer Talk later on Wednesday.

Wayne Rooney’s England retirement tinged with regret

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Wayne Rooney is England’s all-time leading goalscorer with 53 goals and he played for the Three Lions 119 times, more than any other outfield player in history.

[ MORE: Rooney retires from England ]

Rooney’s legacy will live on for decades but when the 31-year-old announced his international retirement on Wednesday, one sentence in his statement will likely stick in your mind.

“One of my very few regrets is not to have been part of a successful England tournament side,” Rooney said.

After 14 years of the hopes and dreams of every English fan being placed on his shoulders at major tournaments as the attacking leader of the so-called “golden generation” perhaps constant failure at the main events are the biggest reason why Rooney has decided to bow out earlier than many expected.

[ VIDEO: Rooney’s top five England goals ]

Rooney hadn’t played for England since November 2016 against Scotland in a 2018 World Cup qualifier, so this wasn’t too much of a surprise, especially after Gareth Southgate left Rooney out of his last two England squads. There is no doubt that his powers have been waning but it appeared Rooney was set for a recall for England’s final batch of qualifiers in the next few months and the captain of the Three Lions would lead the team to Russia next summer.

Yet with less than 10 months until the 2018 World Cup, the tournament Rooney previously stated would be his last for England, why did he now feel the need to step down?

With his fine form for Everton to start this season following 12 months on the fringes at Manchester United (where he became their all-time leading goalscorer last season too) it appeared Rooney was fitter and sharper than he has been for the past four or five years. Fitness does not appear to be the issue.

Cristiano Ronaldo is a year old than Rooney. Lionel Messi is one year younger than Rooney. Like Ronaldo and Messi he has won everything he can in the domestic game, and still that is not enough. All three have the weight of their respective nations on their shoulders but now only Ronaldo and Messi are continuing to lead their nations. Yet in Messi’s case, he too walked away from the national team after they lost to Chile in the 2016 Copa America Centenario, only to be persuaded to return soon after.

Like Rooney, Messi has yet to win a major title with his nation, but Argentina have certainly come much closer (four defeats in major finals, two on penalty kicks and one in extra time during his career with La Albiceleste) than England and Rooney every came. It appears that Rooney will not make a dramatic return for England a la Messi, but never say never.

Of course, one player cannot make a team but you can argue that the England teams Rooney was the focal point of were the greatest to never reach the semifinal of a major tournament, let alone win the damn thing.

Scoring just once in 11 World Cup games for England over three tournaments, Rooney’s finest moments in tournament play came in his first major competition: EURO 2004. In Portugal a young, bullish, teenage Rooney scored twice against Croatia and led England to the quarterfinals before he broke a dreaded metatarsal and England, as they would in the next two tournaments, lost on penalty kicks to Portugal in the quarters.

After that flurry of four goals and an assist in his first four tournament games, Rooney would go on to score just three goals from 47 shots in his next 17 games in major competitions.

More misery in major tournaments arrived as he snapped in the 2006 World Cup quarters, being sent off for a stamp on Ricardo Carvalho, then responded to England fans booing the team in South Africa in 2010 by ranting into TV cameras about their criticism. Rooney was banned for the opening two games of EURO 2012 and returned only for England to exit in the quarterfinals, again, this time to Italy. He finally scored at a World Cup in 2014 but England crashed out at the group stage and he then captained England at EURO 2016 but they bowed out in embarrassing fashion to Iceland in the Round of 16.

That, somewhat poetically, was to be his last appearance for England at a major tournament.

There’s no doubting that Rooney was the most talented striker England ever possessed with his ability to score sublime goals and create chances for his teammates. Yet, the greatest players on the planet are always judged by what they won on their international stage, mostly by dragging the team around them to new levels.

Pele won three World Cups with Brazil. Diego Maradona won one with Argentina. Ronaldo has won a European Championship with Portugal. Rooney won nothing.

That remains the only regret in a storybook international career which saw a lad from Liverpool put on a pedestal at the age of 17 and handed the keys to a nations success.

It didn’t work out how Rooney, and everyone else, had hoped when it came to ending England’s now 51-year wait for a major trophy, but he delivered goals, guile and commitment which the likes of Harry Kane, Dele Alli and Marcus Rashford will try to replicate in the next few decades.

Rooney’s international career will always be celebrated and his achievements are unlikely to be surpassed, but there were always be a tinge of regret he could never lead the Three Lions to international glory.