How does Jermaine Jones help the New England Revolution’s attack?

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Jermaine Jones signed with the MLS and was allocated to the New England Revolution over the Chicago Fire in a random draw. And despite the controversial way of assigning Jones to a specific team, many will ponder his actual impact in MLS, and where he fits with the Revolution specifically.

Obviously, as would be the case with other MLS squads with few big-name DPs, Jones will be the best player on the Revs, no doubt. Jerry Bengtson, the Revolution’s lone Designated Player, was loaned out to Argentine side Belgrano at the end of July. He wasn’t able to address one of New England’s positional needs: a dynamic forward.

Regardless of what happened to Bengston, the Revolution’s central midfield has become a main point of emphasis because their depth at the forward spot can allow Heaps to rotate more freely. Charlie Davies has been grace with decent form, and Patrick Mullins had a notable spell earlier in the year.

In the center midfield, Scott Caldwell and Andy Dorman exist as the two major guys, but Caldwell, while a solid player, doesn’t bring the sort of attacking prowess and consistency that is necessary to boost the Revolution to the top of the Eastern Conference table.

Dorman was put on the disabled list with a sprained MCL in early August, and even though he’s fairly steady in the central midfield, that spark and creative ability to place the offense into scoring positions doesn’t really come to fruition.

The Revolution have playmakers on the team. Lee Nguyen shows his skills time and time again. When Diego Fagundez is playing well, his timely passing can provide the Revs with notable scoring chances. Also, Kelyn Rowe can function in a similar way.

But as MLS Armchair Analyst Matt Doyle explains, a “field general” is precisely what the Revolution lack majorly. And with Jones capacity to play through well-aimed long balls, control the pace of play and sweep past players near the middle of the pitch, he fills a gap for Jay Heaps’ squad.

Jones could possibly have enough of an influence to have the Revs make the playoffs by a decent margin.

USMNT: Brooks out with hip strain; World Cup qualifiers loom

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John Brooks is out of Hertha Berlin’s lineup “for the time being” after scans revealed a hip strain suffered in this weekend’s win over Wolfsburg.

That’s all Hertha has said, and that makes it hard to imagine whether American fans should be a little concerned or very concerned ahead of the USMNT’s World Cup qualifiers against Mexico, and Trinidad and Tobago in early June.

Brooks was unavailable for two weeks with an adductor strain in September, missing a month before returning to the starting lineup.

The U.S. center back pool isn’t teeming after Brooks and Geoff Cameron. Matt Besler, Tim Ream, Omar Gonzalez, and Walker Zimmerman were called up for the last World Cup qualifiers, and Gonzalez struggled but is a Bruce Arena favorite from their time in L.A.

WATCH: Snazzy Sargent goal leads U.S. U-17s past Mexico

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Josh Sargent scored a pretty goal as the United States Soccer program had another banner day against Mexico.

Nearly two months to the day after the U.S. U-20 side beat Mexico for the first time in 31 years, the U.S. U-17 topped El Tri for the first time ever. That win snapped Mexico’s 25-match unbeaten streak.

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The goal is the first of Sargent’s two goals, as the 16-year-old latched onto a long diagonal ball and used his right foot and head to move the ball into position for a strong shot.

The U.S. clinches a spot in the next round of U-17 World Cup qualifying with one match remaining in group play.

Sargent is from St. Louis and plays with Scott Gallagher-Missouri. Former Philadelphia Union coach John Hackworth coaches the U.S. U-17s.

Heads of South American soccer sent $128M in bank transfers

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SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) The leaders of South America’s soccer confederation transferred $128.6 million between 2000 and 2015 to personal accounts, suspicious accounts, or unauthorized third-party accounts, according to an audit released Wednesday by Ernst & Young.

According to the audit presented to the annual CONMEBOL congress in the Chilean capital, the confederation’s former president Nicolas Leoz transferred $26.9 million to his personal accounts. Leoz was the president for 27 years until resigning in 2013 for what he said were health reasons.

The audit also found $58 million in payments “to third parties without adequate documentation,” payments of $33.3 million to “unidentified accounts,” and $10.4 million to “suspicious third-parties.”

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“We had said that we would have four pillars, and the first two pillars were clear accounts and accountability,” said Alejandro Dominguez, the president of CONMEBOL who commissioned the audit last year. “Today we are accountable to the leaders and the whole world of football.”

Leoz, 88, is one of three ex-presidents of CONMEBOL accused on corruption charges by the United States Department of Justice. He is in Paraguay fighting extradition to the United States.

The South American body has been plagued by corruption, which was exposed two years ago during the FIFA scandal. Leoz’s two successors, Eugenio Figueredo and Juan Angel Napout, were both arrested on corruption charges.

“I’m here, I’m the manager” – Moyes will not quit Sunderland

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This has been one horrible stretch for David Moyes.

The Sunderland manager probably thought he’d been through the worst once he left Real Sociedad, where he went 12-15-15.

But he’s managed just seven wins and seven draws in 38 matches in charge of the Black Cats — an 18 percent win mark. He’s also been charged for threatening to slap a female journalist.

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And after Wednesday, Moyes has lost both of his derby matches against Middlesbrough.

Sunderland is 12 points back of safety with five matches left. The odds the Black Cats are headed for the Championship are somewhere north of 99 percent, and fans are calling for his job.

Well, he isn’t quitting. From the BBC:

“No, I’m here, I’m the manager, you take it on the chin. … I’m a football supporter, I know what it’s like. You don’t like seeing your team lose.

“There is nobody who wants to win more than me. I am used to winning, I’m not used to losing and I don’t want to get used to it either.”