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A growing sense of entitlement in U.S. soccer culture, which needs to stop

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Not even 24 hours removed from one of the darkest days in recent U.S. Men’s National team history, and while many sensible supporters recognize the deep-lying issues amongst the American soccer culture a resounding theme for others has been quite the contrary.

Just a word of advice, which is nothing groundbreaking on my end.

[ MORE: U.S. Soccer community reacts to World Cup exclusion ]

Avoid Twitter and other social media platforms at all costs after a brutal loss, like the one we all witnessed on Tuesday night. It only causes emotional distress for all parties involved.

While reading through my Twitter timeline — which is the exact opposite thing I should have been doing — the sentiments popping up, for the most part, were what I fully expected. It was one of disappointment, anger and a little nausea.

However, others in the U.S. soccer community began writing about how the USMNT deserves to be in Russia next summer more so than Panama or Honduras and in an even more comical twist that President Donald Trump is at fault for the Americans’ shortcomings.

I’m certainly not naive enough to believe either of those two sentiments personally, however, it’s become quite clear that the former argument is a resounding theme in the minds of many in the American soccer community.

Over the years there has become a growing sense of entitlement amongst U.S. supporters, and to some degree it’s understandable. The 2018 World Cup cycle will be the first time the Americans haven’t reached the game’s biggest tournament since 1986.

To put that into perspective, 1986 saw Ronald Reagan as president of the United States, Mike Tyson won his first boxing world title and college basketball adopted the three-point line.

Simply put, it’s a long time.

In fact, prior to next summer’s tournament, the USMNT had qualified for seven consecutive trips to the World Cup — which was actually a longer run than Mexico. El Tri were banned from the competition in 1990 for fielding ineligible players during the lead up to the competition.

Does that honestly mean that the World Cup is some sort of right of passage for the Americans though? Because it shouldn’t be.

Yes, the U.S. has made countless strides throughout the years to enhance its standing and perception within the global soccer community, but this is also the classic case of “what have you done for me lately?”

Like other sports and areas of life, it’s about what you earn instead of what you’ve been handed out. It’s absolutely absurd to honestly state that past performances should dictate whether or not the USMNT should be playing in Russia next year.

This team simply wasn’t good enough to qualify, and over 10 matches during the Hexagonal, that truth came bursting out.

Veteran players like Michael Bradley, Tim Howard and Clint Dempsey obviously have played massive roles in the past for the USMNT, and deserve credit for their service, but those three and the rest of the squad know that they needed to be better on Tuesday and throughout their qualifying campaign.

That’s not a knock on just the players though. The word “systemic” has been brought up for some time now, and that’s referring to the broader issues within U.S. Soccer that go above and beyond simply the selection of players.

To use another example, look at Brazil at the last World Cup. The Selecao are a perennial power in soccer, and have been for decades. The Brazilians were handed a humbling for the ages by Germany in the semifinals, before being thumped by Holland once again in the third-place match in front of their home crowd.

[ MORE: A way-too-early look at what’s next for the USMNT ]

For most countries, reaching the semifinal at the World Cup would be a massive accomplishment, but not for Brazil or any other top soccer-playing nation.

The USMNT has had its humbling experience, and as Ian Darke said so eloquently worded on Tuesday, the “USA did not earn it.”

They’ve got to bounce back and prepare itself better for the future after the incumbent changes occur in the coming days and weeks.

In the words of a popular children’s book, “You get what you get, and you don’t throw a fit!”

WATCH LIVE: Everton vs. Swansea City

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Everton looks to continue its upswing while reversing the hoodoo of Swansea City when it hosts the Welsh side at Goodison Park on Monday (Watch live at 3 p.m. ET on NBCSN and online via NBCSports.com).

WATCH LIVE, ONLINE, HERE

Swans have not lost to Everton in three seasons, but sit bottom of the Premier League table.

Sam Allardyce started Gylfi Sigurdsson and Ashley Williams against the former side, while Paul Clement will hope to get an upset with Wilfried Bony up top.

LINEUPS

Everton: Pickford, Kenny, Martina, Holgate, Williams, Schneiderlin, Gana Gueye, Lennon, Rooney, Sigurdsson, Calvert-Lewin. Subs: Robles, Keane, Jagielka, Ramirez, Davies, Vlasic, Lookman.

Swansea City: Fabianski, Naughton, Fernandez, Mawson, Olsson, Roque Mesa, Fer, Carroll, Dyer, Narsingh, Bony. Subs: Nordfeldt, van der Hoorn, Rangel, Clucas, Sanches, Ayew, Abraham.

Timbers make it official: Savarese is the new boss

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The Portland Timbers have made it official, announcing the hiring of New York Cosmos architect Giovanni Savarese as the successor to Caleb Porter.

Savarese, 46, led the Cosmos to three NASL Championship Games in his first run as a manager, following a playing career that included stops at Millwall, NY/NJ MetroStars, and Swansea City. He attended Long Island University, and was capped 30 times with 10 goals for Venezuela.

[ BLANC: I turned down USMNT talks ]

He’s an intriguing hire for Portland, who won an MLS Cup but suffered from inconsistency under the highly-regarded Porter (twice missing the playoffs but twice earning the West’s No. 1 seed). While the Cosmos regularly spent well, Savarese navigated the uncertain waters of a nascent league with regular success.

From Timbers.com:

“I am both excited and proud to become the head coach of the Portland Timbers, and this is an ideal fit and outstanding opportunity for me as I take the next step in my coaching career,” Savarese said. “The passion, ambition and support surrounding this club is truly inspiring, and I am sincerely honored and grateful for this opportunity to lead it on the pitch and to build on the club’s history of success for the community and the incredible supporters of the Portland Timbers.”

The hiring has been rumored for some time. Though Savarese was loyal to the Cosmos, the NASL’s future has been hung in the hands of the legal system for some time due to a bold lawsuit against U.S. Soccer Federation. The NASL contends that the relationships between the USSF, Soccer United Marketing, United Soccer League, and Major League Soccer have conspired to stop the NASL from competing with MLS as a D-1 league.

LVG would only return to club football to get at Man Utd

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Leave it to The Daily Mirror to find that last bit of juice when it comes to Manchester United and former manager Louis Van Gaal.

Well, probably the last bit.

The Dutch manager said he does not expect to return to club football, unless one of the big boys in the Premier League offered him the chance to take a run at United. The Red Devils, of course, fired him shortly after an FA Cup title in order to hire Jose Mourinho.

[ MORE: WBA 1-2 Man Utd | Bournemouth 0-4 Liverpool ]

From The Mirror, quoting LVG at a Sunday night function in Rotterdam.

“I will probably not manage a club anymore,” Van Gaal said. “I would make one exception: If a big English club comes for me, than I would do it. Because then I can get the chance to get one over on Manchester United.’’

Could you see him getting a run at any of the Top Four contenders, even on a caretaker basis? Could Liverpool come calling if they tired of Jurgen Klopp one season, or might Arsenal or even Everton need a stopgap (should the Toffees spending come good)?

Suspended Villar says Spain in danger of missing World Cup

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The suspended president of the Spanish soccer federation, who is under investigation for corruption, tried Monday to stoke up fears that the country could be kicked out of the World Cup because of government interference.

Angel Maria Villar, who is free on bail, spoke at a news conference in Madrid and again denied any wrongdoing. He also blamed the government for meddling in the federation’s affairs by suspending him.

“This government is putting Spain’s participation in the World Cup at risk,” the 67-year-old Villar said in his first news conference since being arrested in July along with his son, Gorka Villar, and two other officials.

[ BLANC: I turned down USMNT talks ]

“The risk is serious,” Villar said. “The only party responsible for Spain not going to the World Cup will be the Spanish government.”

Villar spoke three days after FIFA said it was concerned about the independence of the Spanish soccer federation and that it would soon send a delegation to analyze the situation. FIFA made no mention of a possible suspension of the federation, which could keep Spain out of next year’s World Cup in Russia or even knock Real Madrid and Barcelona out of the Champions League.

Villar, who has spent time behind bars to impede the possible destruction of evidence, and the other three officials are being investigated for alleged improper management, misappropriation of funds, corruption and falsifying documents.

Villar resigned his vice presidencies of both FIFA and UEFA following his arrest. But he tried to stay on as the head of Spanish federation, a post he held for three decades.

His refusal to listen to pleas for him to step down led the Spanish government to suspend him from the post for one year pending the outcome of the investigation. Court documents allege that besides misappropriated funds, Villar is suspected of corrupting several regional federations by offering favors in exchange for votes.

Villar fired back at the government, saying his suspension had broken FIFA rules since it represented interference in the federation’s management.

“It’s easy to see that the source of concern was my arbitrary and unjustified removal from the presidency of the federation and for not respecting the presumption of innocence,” Villar said, adding that other teams are ready to take Spain’s place at the World Cup.

“Be careful. There are other powerful countries that didn’t qualify like Italy that are waiting to pounce and take our place,” Villar said.

Spain, which won the World Cup in 2010, is considered to be among the favorites for next year’s tournament.