Cameron Carter-Vickers

Photo by Catherine Ivill/Getty Images

Scott, dual Americans must top Cordeiro’s USMNT priorities

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With no national team in the World Cup and without a wild outsider laying claim to the U.S. presidential chair, many American soccer fans have let the United States men’s national team slip to the back of their minds.

And while that’s understandable, new boss Carlos Cordeiro needs his recruiters working hard in two areas: finding the top man to be U.S. technical director, and making sure the next Jonathan Gonzalez isn’t largely ignored while he decides to switch allegiances to Mexico.

[ MORE: American debuts as Chelsea tops Hull ]

He may not have a ton of convincing to do, thanks to current staffers, but there are a least a couple dozen short phone calls he should make on behalf of the men’s national team.

“Hey, I’m the new president. We’re going to hire some new soccer people and a USMNT manager, but I want you to know we know and care about you.”

LONDON: Scott holds off pressure from Evandro Goebel (Photo by Catherine Ivill/Getty Images).

Kyle Scott stands as one of three reminders just this month. The Chelsea 20-year-old center midfielder, born in Bath, represented England at U-16 level and Republic of Ireland at U-17 before switching to the U.S. for U-18 and U-20 duty.

He is, barring some unknown FIFA bylaws, another prospect who could fall between the cracks™.

Eight days ago, Bundesliga.com listed 10 young league talents who could “soon join the USA national team,” including teenagers like Bayern Munich youth Timothy Tillman, Malik Tillman, and Jalen Hawkins, as well as established players like Borussia Dortmund’s Jeremy Toljan (23).

Goal.com’s Ives Galarcep moved four Mexican-American prospects into the hopper when he wrote about three LA Galaxy prospects and NC State right back Manny Perez.

Plus: we’re all quite aware of Spurs center back Cameron Carter-Vickers.

I was critical of U.S. Soccer for implementing a number of significant measures last month in the run-up to the presidential election, things that might have been better with approval from the new president, but it’s worth noting that not a single one of these players needed to wait for a recruitment push from Tab Ramos or any number of influential people in the USSF set-up.

To be clear: playing in a German youth set-up doesn’t make a player superior to stateside prospects, and there are any number of perceived European academy washouts playing NCAA Soccer who won’t go on to sniff an MLS Draft slot, let alone a battle between Hoffenheim and Mainz.

But Bob Bradley and Jurgen Klinsmann were both very successful at convincing players, future stars and let-downs alike, to choose their American heritage. Whether Bruce Arena or Tim Howard thinks these players are American-blooded enough to succeed is irrelevant in my opinion, let the field sort that out.

But Cordeiro could go a long way toward currying favor with his new populace by finding the next Klinsmann-level super recruiter to make sure that the player pool is as deep as possible.

Every Premier League transfer deal in January

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Did your club get its moves over the line? Or were they all settled before the window moved to Wednesday?

[ MORE: JPW grades every PL club ]

Thanks to PremierLeague.com, we’ve got the full list of ins and outs from the most competitive top league in the world.

Arsenal

In
Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang (Borussia Dortmund) Undisclosed
Konstantinos Mavropanos (PAS Giannina) Undisclosed
Henrikh Mkhitaryan (Man Utd) Swap

Out
Jeff-Reine Adelaide (Angers) Loan
Chuba Akpom (Sint-Truidense) Loan
Krystian Bielik (Walsall) Loan
Francis Coquelin (Valencia) Undisclosed
Mathieu Debuchy (Saint-Etienne) Undisclosed
Olivier Giroud (Chelsea) Undisclosed
Stephy Mavididi (Charlton Athletic) Loan
Marcus McGuane (Barcelona) Undisclosed
Tafari Moore (Wycombe Wanderers) Loan
Julio Pleguezuelo (Gimnastic de Tarragona) Loan
Alexis Sanchez (Man Utd) Swap
Ben Sheaf (Stevenage) Loan
Theo Walcott (Everton) Undisclosed

AFC Bournemouth

In
Lewis Grabban (Sunderland) Loan return

Out
Baily Cargill (Partick Thistle) Loan
Mihai Dobre (Rochdale) Loan
Lewis Grabban (Aston Villa) Loan
Shaun Hobson (Chester) Loan
Connor Mahoney (Barnsley) Loan
Sam Matthews (Eastleigh) Loan extension
Ollie Harfield (Boreham Wood) Loan
Aaron Ramsdale (Chesterfield) Loan
Ben Whitfield (Port Vale) Loan extension

Brighton & Hove Albion

In
Warren O’Hora (Bohemians) Undisclosed
Jurgen Locadia (PSV Eindhoven) Undisclosed
Leonardo Ulloa (Leicester) Loan

Out
Soufyan Ahannach (Sparta Rotterdam) Loan
David Ajiboye (Millwall) Loan
Jonah Ayunga (Poole Town) Loan
Charlie Ferguson (East Grinstead Town) Loan
Ben Hall (Notts County) Loan
Kazenga LuaLua (Sunderland) Free
Stefan Ljubicic (Bognor Regis Town) Loan
Jordan Maguire-Drew (Coventry City) Loan
Reece Meekums (Worthing) Loan extension
Jamie Murphy (Rangers) Loan
Mathias Normann (Molde) Loan extension
Rian O’Sullivan (Carshalton Athletic) Loan
Bailey Vose (Welling United) Loan

Burnley

In
Aaron Lennon (Everton) Undisclosed
Georges-Kevin Nkoudou (Spurs) Loan

Out
Dan Agyei (Blackpool) Loan
Tom Anderson (Doncaster Rovers) Loan
Jimmy Dunne (Accrington Stanley) Loan
Harry Flowers (Guiseley) Undisclosed
Josh Ginnelly (Tranmere Rovers) Loan
Luke Hendrie (Shrewsbury Town) Undisclosed
Alex Whitmore (Chesterfield) Undisclosed

Chelsea

In
Ross Barkley (Everton) Undisclosed
Olivier Giroud (Arsenal) Undisclosed
Emerson Palmieri (Roma) Undisclosed

Emerson, pictured with Chelsea director Marina Granovskaia (chelseafc.com)

Out
Michy Batshuayi (Borussia Dortmund) Loan
Jake Clarke-Salter (Sunderland) Loan
Jordan Houghton (Doncaster Rovers) Loan extension
Todd Kane (Oxford United) Loan
Kenedy (Newcastle) Loan
Charly Musonda Jr (Celtic) Loan
Baba Rahman (Schalke) Loan
Ike Ugbo (MK Dons) Loan

Crystal Palace

In
Jaroslaw Jach (Zaglebie Lubin) Undisclosed
Erdal Rakip (Benfica) Loan
Alexander Sørloth (Midtjylland) Undisclosed

Out
Keshi Anderson (Swindon Town) Undisclosed
Andre Coker (Maidstone United) Loan
Noor Husin (Notts County) Undisclosed
Sullay Kalkai (Charlton) Loan
Freddie Ladapo (Southend United) Undisclosed

Everton

In
Cenk Tosun (Besiktas) Undisclosed
Theo Walcott (Arsenal) Undisclosed

Out
Ross Barkley (Chelsea) Undisclosed
Harry Charsley (Bolton Wanderers) Loan
Louis Gray (Carlisle United) Loan
Gethin Jones (Fleetwood Town) Undisclosed
Aaron Lennon (Burnley) Undisclosed
Ademola Lookman (RB Leipzig) Loan
Boris Mathis (Northampton Town) Loan
Kevin Mirallas (Olympiacos) Loan
Sandro Ramirez (Sevilla) Loan
Antonee Robinson (Bolton Wanderers) Loan extension
Liam Walsh (Bristol City) Undisclosed

Huddersfield Town

In
Terence Kongolo (Monaco) Loan
Jack Payne (Oxford Utd) Loan recall
Alex Pritchard (Norwich City) Undisclosed

Out
Jack Boyle (Clyde) Loan
Dylan Cogill (Clyde) LoanFraser Horsfall (Kidderminster Harriers) Undisclosed
Danny Kane (Cork City) Undisclosed
Joe Lolley (Nottingham Forest) Undisclosed
Jack Payne (Blackburn Rovers) Loan
Ryan Schofield (AFC Telford) Loan
Tadhg Ryan (Released)
Cedwyn Scott (Dundee) Undisclosed

Leicester City

In
Fousseni Diabate (Gazalec Ajaccio) Undisclosed
Callum Wright (Blackburn Rovers) Undisclosed

Out
Andy King (Swansea City) Loan
Ahmed Musa (CSKA Moscow) Loan
Islam Slimani (Newcastle United) Loan
Raul Uche (Real Betis) Loan
Leonardo Ulloa (Leicester) Loan

Liverpool

In
Tony Gallacher (Falkirk)
Ryan Kent (Freiburg) Loan return
Virgil Van Dijk (Southampton) Undisclosed

(AP Photo/Rui Vieira)

Out
Cameron Brannagan (Oxford United) Undisclosed
Philippe Coutinho (Barcelona) Undisclosed
Ovie Ejaria (Sunderland) Loan
Jon Flanagan (Bolton Wanderers) Loan
Marko Grujic (Cardiff City) Loan
Lloyd Jones (Luton Town) Undisclosed
Ryan Kent (Bristol City) Loan
Lazar Markovic (Anderlecht) Loan
Daniel Sturridge (West Brom) Loan
Matty Virtue (Notts County) Loan
Corey Whelan (Yeovil Town) Loan
Harry Wilson (Hull City) Loan

Manchester City

In
Jack Harrison (New York City) Undisclosed
Aymeric Laporte (Athletic Bilbao) Undisclosed

Out
Kean Bryan (Oldham Athletic) Loan
Isaac Buckley (Oxford United) Loan
Jacob Davenport (Burton Albion) Loan
Shay Facey (Northampton Town) Undisclosed
Jack Harrison (Middlesbrough) Loan
Marlos Moreno (Flamengo) Loan
Ashley Smith-Brown (Oxford United) Loan

Manchester United

In
Cameron Borthwick-Jackson (Leeds) Loan recall
Matej Kovar (FC Slovacko) Undisclosed
Alexis Sanchez (Arsenal) Swap
Matty Willock (Utrecht) Loan return

Out
James Wilson (Sheffield United) Loan
Henrikh Mkhitaryan (Arsenal) Swap
Alex Tuanzebe (Aston Villa) Loan
Matty Willock (St Johnstone) Loan
Charlie Scott (Hamilton Academical) Loan
Demi Mitchell (Hearts) Loan

Newcastle United

In
Martin Dubravka (Sparta Prague) Loan
Kenedy (Chelsea) Loan
Islam Slimani (Leicester City) Loan

@NUFC

Out
Rolando Aarons (Hellas Verona) Loan
Adam Armstrong (Blackburn Rovers) Loan
Dan Barlaser (Crewe Alexandra) Loan
Kyle Cameron (Queen of the South) Loan
Jack Colback (Nottingham Forest) Loan
Stuart Findlay (Kilmarnock) Loan extension
Lewis McNall (Gateshead) Loan
Aleksandar Mitrovic (Fulham) Loan
Henri Saivet (Sivasspor) Loan
Islam Slimani (Leicester City) Loan
Ivan Toney (Scunthorpe United) Loan
Callum Williams (Gateshead) Loan
Freddie Woodman (Aberdeen) Loan

Southampton

In
Guido Carrillo (Monaco) Undisclosed

Out
Marcus Barnes (Yeovil Town) Loan
Ryan Seager (Yeovil) Loan
Matt Targett (Fulham) Loan
Virgil van Dijk (Liverpool) Undisclosed

Stoke City

In
Moritz Bauer (Rubin Kazan) Undisclosed
Moussa Niakate (Paris FC) Undisclosed
Badou Ndiaye (Galatasaray) EUR16million
Kostas Stafylidis (Augsburg) Loan

Out
Jake Dunwoody (Curzon Ashton) Loan
Julien Ngoy (Walsall) Loan
Harry Souttar (Ross County) Loan
Josh Tymon (MK Dons) Loan

Swansea City

In
Andre Ayew (West Ham) Undisclosed
Andy King (Leicester City) Loan
Jack Withers (Boston United) Undisclosed

Out
Ryan Blair (Falkirk) Loan
Jay Fulton (Wigan) Loan
Adam King (Mansfield) Loan
Oliver McBurnie (Barnsley) Loan
Roque Mesa (Sevilla) Loan
Tyler Reid (Newport County) Loan
Joe Rodon (Cheltenham Town) Loan
Josh Sheehan (Newport County) Free
Jack Withers (Boston United) Loan

Tottenham Hotspur

In
Lucas Moura (Paris Saint-Germain) Undisclosed

Paris Saint-Germain’s Lucas Moura  (Rick Osentoski/AP Images for International Champions Cup)

Out
Luke Amos (Stevenage) Loan
Cameron Carter-Vickers (Ipswich Town) Loan
Marcus Edwards (Norwich City) Loan
Ryan Loft (Exeter City) Loan
Georges-Kevin Nkoudou (Burnley) Loan
Anton Walkes (Portsmouth) Loan

Watford

In
Pontus Dahlberg (IFK Gothenburg) Undisclosed
Gerard Deulofeu (Barcelona) Loan
Dodi Lukebakio (Charleroi) Undisclosed
Didier Ndong (Sunderland) Loan

Out
Pontus Dahlberg (IFK Gothenburg) Loan
Brice Dja Djedje (RC Lens) Loan
Michael Folivi (Boreham Wood) Loan
Alex Jakubiak (Falkirk) Loan
Brandon Mason (Dundee United) Loan
Costel Pantilimon (Nottingham Forest) Loan
Charlie Rowan (Accrington Stanley) Loan
Isaac Success (Malaga) Loan
Ben Watson Released
Randell Williams (Wycombe Wanderers) Loan
Mauro Zarate (Velez Sarsfield) Loan

West Bromwich Albion

In
Ali Gabr (Zamalek) Loan
Rekeem Harper (Blackburn) Loan return
Jonathan Leko (Bristol City) Loan return
Daniel Sturridge (Liverpool) Loan

Out
Tahvon Campbell (Forest Green Rovers) Loan
Shaun Donnellan (Yeovil) Undisclosed
Kyle Edwards (Exeter City) Loan
Kyle Howkins (Port Vale) Loan
Jasko Keranovic (Kilmarnock) Loan
Max Melbourne (Ross County) Loan
Dara O'Shea (Hereford FC) Loan extension
Tyler Roberts (Leeds) Undisclosed
Kane Wilson (Exeter City) Loan extension

West Ham United

In
Joao Mario (Inter Milan) Loan
Reece Oxford (Borussia Moenchengladbach) Loan return

Out
Reece Burke (Bolton Wanderers) Loan
Moses Makasi (Plymouth Argyle) Loan
Reece Oxford (Borussia Moenchengladbach) Loan
Diafra Sakho (Rennes) Undisclosed
Martin Samuelsen (Burton Albion) Loan

USMNT centerback Carter-Vickers heads to Ipswich Town on loan

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Cameron Carter-Vickers has a new club to call home for the next five months or so after a rough first half of the season.

Tottenham announced Friday morning that it had loaned the U.S. Men’s National Team centerback to Championship club Ipswich Town for the rest of the season. Carter-Vickers spent the first five months of the season at fellow Championship side Sheffield United, starting 17 times though he struggled recently as Sheffield won just one game he played in during the month of December, losing three and drawing one.

[ FOLLOW: All of PST’s PL coverage ]

Carter-Vickers was then recalled earlier this week and now has a new home with a mid-table Championship club, with a new chance to impress. Hopefully Carter-Vickers can recover his form and continue to grow, potentially latching on to another Premier League side next year or breaking into the Tottenham first team.

There’s another interesting American tie-in to this. Carter-Vickers appears to be a short-term replacement for Ipswich Town’s Tommy Smith, who the club states is headed to join the Colorado Rapids ahead of the 2018 MLS season.

Williams eager to lead USMNT rebuild

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Danny Williams is living his dream in the Premier League.

[ VIDEO: Premier League highlights

A regular for Huddersfield Town, driving on their fairytale from midfield with his tattoos, pristine hair and beard and all action displays impressing Terriers’ fans, Williams is arguably in the best form of his career.

He is relaxed, confident and quick-witted as we caught up at Huddersfield’s Canal Side training complex in the center of the West Yorkshire town.

Why wouldn’t he be?

Williams, 28, is playing in his first-ever season in England’s top-flight after slogging away in the second-tier for four years with Reading before moving to Huddersfield in the summer on a two-year deal. He hailed their fans as “incredible” and saluted their start to the season as former USMNT forward and current Huddersfield coach David Wagner has them three points off the top 10 with the busy festive season ahead.

Despite their fine start to the season, Premier League survival is still the main aim and Williams has been a big part of the underdogs impressing in their debut season in the PL.

His fine form for Huddersfield has led to a return to the U.S. national team after a prolonged absence through injury and a combination of both Jurgen Klinsmann and Bruce Arena not calling him up. And not only was Williams called up to the USMNT for the first time in over a year for the 1-1 draw with Portugal last month, he also captained the Stars and Stripes for the first time in his career.

Beaming from ear to ear, Williams is still a proud man over a month removed from that draw in Leiria.

“Obviously it was a huge honor for me. I didn’t realize how big it was in the moment,” Williams admitted. “I played the game, tried to lead like I always do but it wasn’t until afterwards I realized. It had such a big impact. I got a lot of messages from everyone. It was a really proud moment and that’s why I really enjoyed it, because you go from not being invited to being captain of the team. It was also because Alejandro Bedoya had a knock. He would have captained the team but I was happy to step in.”

Williams hasn’t had the luxury of stepping in for the U.S. for quite some time.

His last USMNT’s appearance came in the friendly against New Zealand in Oct. 2016 and although he thanked Klinsmann for giving him the chance to first represent the U.S. way back in 2011 (he was the first new player Klinsmann called up) he revealed he never felt like he was truly trusted.

“I get it, I had a few bad performances but maybe because I never felt the trust, you know? When I get a lot of trust, I pay it back with performances and I think that’s the same with every player,” Williams said. “If you have confidence from the manager and all the team, you can perform, and I just feel like I’ve never really been given that kind of trust. But that’s all in the past. I’m a bit more mature and older now and nobody can break me down that easy. I’ve shown people I can fight and I want to leave that in the past.”

Asked if he was ever given a reason for not being called up by Klinsmann again, or as to why he was not picked by Arena during his ill-fated 11 months in charge of the USMNT, Williams revealed some intriguing details.

“It was frustrating but nobody really ever talked to me or gave me a reason,” Williams explained. “I didn’t even know what the reason was, you know? Some people might have said ‘you only play in the Championship’ or whatever, but I think the Championship is still a strong league and I think you could see last year with Newcastle and even the teams down there now they are big teams, big, big clubs and good football players. I could never understand why I was invited because I think in the four years at Reading I did, basically, everything in my power to show the world that I am still on a good level and I can perform. Obviously I was a bit unlucky with injuries but in my opinion nobody really spoke to me.

“Some people wanted to play the MLS guys a little more but whatever, but Bruce Arena emailed me and said ‘you’re in the picture but I haven’t really seen you.’ And I thought that was a bit strange because you must know your players, don’t you? Especially because I am not 18. I was around the camp but I read something where he said the players Klinsmann invited were German-Americans, I don’t know what it was, but I felt a bit weird about it because I played on a high level for basically now eight or nine years. But again, I didn’t really want to say anything because, what could I do? I can’t influence if a manager likes me or not but I think we could all get a fair chance. It was a bit weird but hopefully now that I’m in the Premier League, that will change.”

Williams has moved from the suburbs of London to Manchester and is now very much in the PL circle. He includes Manchester City’s Leroy Sane among his close friends and sees him as “sort of a little brother” who he takes under his wing.

His play his developed from a true holding midfielder to being a two-way midfielder who chipped in with several stunning goals during his time at Reading. Williams’ position has changed and it certainly seems like he would be a valuable foil alongside Michael Bradley in the U.S. midfield in the years to come.

Back to the USMNT, does Williams still want to be a leading man for the USA moving forward?

“To be honest, you have to look at the U.S. national team at the moment and who is actually playing on a high level, I mean playing in Europe in the big leagues, there are not so many players,” Williams said. “In my opinion, as long as I play in the Premier League, get the minutes under my belt, I think I have every right to be a bit surprised if they don’t invite me. Again, that’s not in my hands. The only thing I can influence is my own performance and how I do with the team and hopefully that earns me a spot with the U.S.”

Williams sees a bright future not only for himself with the USMNT, but also for the band of young Americans coming through the ranks, such as Christian Pulisic and Weston McKennie in the Bundesliga.

The midfielder rose into the Bundesliga himself as a youngster with Freiburg and Hoffenheim, before moving to Reading in 2013, and he believes that both McKennie and Pulisic will lead the U.S. in the future, supported by a growing cast of young stars who played against Portugal last month.

“They’re playing a big part of the future. I got to play with Weston McKennie and there’s huge potential there but not only him, Cameron Carter-Vickers and Tyler Adams and Kellyn Acosta, I think they are all ready to be in Europe. Then obviously Pulisic is already a superstar in the States and he performs on a high level, when you see him playing against Real Madrid in the Champions League, that is top class and I wouldn’t be surprised if he soon got a move away from Dortmund. They will play a big, big part because they are a new generation. They are kids and I remember when I was that young. They are all hungry. They are all super excited. I think that’s what it is. They want to be hungry because they still want to learn something and they like the competition. They have a big, big part in the future.”

That said, the future for the USMNT doesn’t seem that exciting right now.

With the U.S. currently without a coach after Arena stepped down following the failure to make the 2018 World Cup, who would Williams like to see appointed as the next USMNT head coach and what qualities do they need to have?

He has a simple checklist: give everyone, not matter what league they play in, a clean slate.

“It doesn’t necessarily have to be a U.S. coach. It is international football. I think we should get someone who has experience and has proper ambition with a proper plan and doesn’t prefer and trust either American players or American-German players or just American-Mexican players. He should give everybody a fair chance,” Williams said. “He should look at how all of these potential players perform in their clubs and should really start from scratch. The U.S. is such a great country and not making the World Cup, it’s kind of like a scandal.”

Most would say that’s being polite.

The U.S. not reaching its first World Cup since 1986 has dominated headlines across the American soccer landscape for the past two months and with no coach, and outgoing U.S. Soccer president in Sunil Gulati, and big question marks over a host of veteran players, the USMNT is in dire straits and at a major crossroads.

Williams winced when asked if it hurt to watch on from afar as the USMNT failed to qualify for the 2018 World Cup and pointed to some politics behind-the-scenes as a major reason for the USA’s scandalous failure.

“Of course it hurts. I am obviously 28 now. I saw that as an opportunity to make a name for myself again. I thought ‘okay, I am now in the Premier League and hopefully I get a chance to get called in and show what I can do.’ I think there are too many political things going on behind-the-scenes,” Williams said. “I wasn’t really close enough with the team for that amount of time so I can’t really talk, or give too much information, because I don’t really know about what happened.

“Obviously I spoke to the boys when I was in Portugal. Everybody has a different view. I heard from a few people that they tried to ‘market the MLS’ a bit more, in the [World Cup] qualifying games and get a name for the MLS. At the end of the day it shouldn’t be about that. It should be about quality and bringing the best players and having a plan. That is it. It is not only the U.S. that failed. Holland failed. Italy. Chile. This is unbelievable. Something is obviously going wrong because other smaller nations, they are speeding up their process. When I look at Iceland, they are a small country but they are actually playing at the World Cup.”

As his star continues to rise in the Premier League with Huddersfield, Williams will no doubt become an increasingly important figure as the USMNT rebuild from a monumental failure.

He hopes other talented young American players follow in the footsteps of Pulisic, McKennie and Co. to test themselves among the best leagues on the planet.

“It is very important that you don’t lose the focus because at the end of the day the USA is such a big country with so many great athletes, there is so much potential,” Williams said. “When I see the young boys I played with against Portugal, I am sure there are more out there who are hungry and happy to learn and make the step to Europe to get out of their comfort zone and be successful. That is what it needs and what it takes.”

PST Survey results: Most exciting USMNT prospect

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The results of PST’s Big American Soccer Survey are in, and our staff will be walking through the results of thousands of votes in a series of posts this week.

We didn’t realize you could acronymize it to BASS, or else we would’ve done it sooner. Today’s question: Excluding Christian Pulisic, who’s no longer a prospect despite being just 19, who is the most exciting USMNT prospect.

[ MORE: All Big American Soccer Survey posts ]

Exciting performances in the U-20 and U-17 World Cups have given United States men’s national team fans plenty of hope for the future.

The most-mentioned write-in, collecting across all attempting spellings, was injured Arsenal playmaker Gedion Zelalem.

As for the serious contenders, Jonathan Gonzalez, Andrew Carleton Tyler Adams, and Lynden Gooch lagged behind this pack of four:

Cameron Carter-Vickers — 14 percent — He had a howling back pass in Sheffield United’s 5-4 loss to Fulham on Wednesday, but the on-loan Spurs 19-year-old center back is playing every minute for a club very much in the mix for Premier League promotion.

Weston McKennie — 18 percent — Another 19-year-old, McKennie was one of the Men of the Match as Schalke went second in the Bundesliga this weekend. He’s been a regular starter when healthy, and played advanced, central, and set back in Schalke’s midfield. Next up: a Revierderby meeting with Pulisic and Borussia Dortmund.

Josh Sargent — 21 percent — Off to Werder Bremen when he turns 18 in late February, Sargent has four goals in five matches for the U.S. U-20s, and 14 in 29 for the U-17s. That includes four goals and two assists in his last three outings, against Paraguay, England, and Hungary.

Tim Weah — 24 percent — The son of African legend George Weah, Tim turns 18 two days after Sargent. Unlike his countryman, Weah has been in Europe for some time. The Paris Saint-Germain prospect is slated to get his First Team bow some time soon, having scored four goals and added an assist for PSG in the UEFA Youth League.