Americans Abroad

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WATCH: USMNT’s Chandler scores for Eintracht Frankfurt

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It’s one appearance, one goal for USMNT wide man Timmy Chandler in his 2017-18 campaign with Eintracht Frankfurt.

Granted this goal came against lower-tier competition in the German Cup, but the 29-times capped defender now has two goals and nine assists for Eintracht since transferring from Nurmberg in 2014.

[ MORE: NYCFC wins in LA ]

Chandler, 27, has an unclear role in Bruce Arena’s plans with the USMNT. Previous coach Jurgen Klinsmann never figured out the right system for the player, and it will be interesting to see if Chandler continues to be instrumental in his European club but an odd-shaped piece in his national team’s jigsaw puzzle.

Hertha keeper Jonathan Klinsmann out weeks with ankle injury

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BERLIN (AP) Hertha Berlin goalkeeper Jonathan Klinsmann has been ruled out for several weeks with ligament damage in his right ankle.

The Bundesliga side says the 20-year-old Klinsmann, who joined the club in the offseason after impressing in a trial, was injured in training a few days ago, and its extent was confirmed by a scan.

[ MORE: Watch full PL match replays ]

Klinsmann, the son of former United States coach and Germany striker Jurgen Klinsmann, is a goalkeeper with the U.S, Under-20s.

He was last playing for University of California before he joined Hertha.

DC brings U.S. U-20 Canouse home from Bundesliga

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DC United may be bringing a pair of Americans home to Major League Soccer.

Reports Wednesday linked the Black-and-Red with USMNT midfielder Paul Arriola, late of Club Tijuana in Liga MX. Arriola has 11 caps with two goals for the Yanks.

The 22-year-old midfielder is going to cost DC a club record $3 million, according to the Washington Post, and the Eastern Conference club is also going to have to ship money to LA Galaxy, holders of Arriola’s MLS rights.

[ MORE: All the latest transfer news ]

Meanwhile, DC announced the addition of another 22-year-old midfielder in Hoffenheim’s Russell Canouse. The Pennsylvania native leaves Germany with one Bundesliga appearances and 20 in Germany’s second tier after going on loan to Vfl Bochum, where he scored one goal in 905 minutes.

From DCUnited.com:

“Russell is a dominant holding midfielder with great talent and vision, especially as a young player,” Dave Kasper, United general manager and VP of soccer operations, said. “We’re pleased to acquire such a accomplished 22-year-old with years of European experience. He is a strong, physical presence who has an acute ability to dictate play.”

As good as these two are, the best international resume belongs to a third pickup for struggling United. Coach Ben Olsen can now deploy Hungarian international Zoltan Stieber.

Stieber, 28, has 21 caps and three goals for Hungary, including a goal against Austria at EURO 2016. A left wing and striker, Stieber comes from 2.Bundesliga side Kaiserslautern. He posted two goals and five assists for the side. He’s also played for Hamburg, Mainz, and Yeovil Town.

All this as well as the jettisoning of Lamar Neagle, Sebastian Le Toux, and Bobby Boswell. DC is going to look very different this weekend in a bid to improve on the league’s worst record.

MLS, European vet Warshaw’s memoir is an exposed nerve

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It’s a well-worn literary cliche to praise a book for taking the reader “behind the scenes” of something normally cloaked in secrecy or treated like an exclusive club.

Yet what former professional soccer player Bobby Warshaw does in “When The Dream Became Reality” cuts to the very core of such usually overblown acclaim. Warshaw taps his typing fingers into his guts to push out every bit of a soccer and human journey, beautiful and ugly, that started in Pennsylvania and headed to California, Brazil, Dallas, Norway, Sweden, and Israel.

For those who’ve watched “Rise and Shine,” the documentary of Jay DeMerit’s post-graduate decision to go from the University of Illinois at Chicago to knocking on doors of professional clubs around England, consider that. Now skip the part about Premier League glory and cover the rest of the story in brutal self-analysis and uncommon truth-telling about the risings and failings of an athlete who believes deeply in his teams (often at the probable expense of his future).

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To open up like that is a challenge around friends (or a psychiatrist). Warshaw does it for the world.

“The fact that it hasn’t ruined my life yet is a plus,” Warshaw told PST.

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It helps that Warshaw’s personality lends itself to honesty. Self-confidence gives way to self-deprecation at times, but the former U.S. U-17 midfielder’s growth from Stanford to FC Dallas to Europe and back is laced with vitriol, humor, and a willingness to meet the reader’s life head-on.

So for every entertaining story detailing a foul that led him to five lost teeth and the same number of root canals, or a knock-down drag-out fight with his MLS manager about loyalty and player selection, there’s a bared and raw player questioning whether he’s made the right move. And he goes after his own experience with a savage comb, telling stories about his competitive streak many would swerve to avoid like jagged glass in the middle of the road.

“The theme of the book is we all have taken risks in your life,” Warshaw said. “I’ve done it enough that I’m conditioned that if I’m not scared out of my mind, I’m not doing something right.”

And that’s not to say writing with such candor was easy. Warshaw admits that at least one of his editors, MLSSoccer.com’s Matt Doyle, was sent a draft not for word work but to make sure the book wouldn’t shove his career into a wood chipper.

“I was so scared the whole time,” he admits. “Sick to my stomach on a daily basis, minor panic attacks. I’m not a religious dude, I’m not very faithful, but I had this one general idea that I feel these things and I’m scared to death to put them out there but everyone else feels them too. Trust that these are universal feelings. We all feel them and we never talk about them enough and it might do some good for the world. I had that little seed of faith in the back of my mind.”

[ MORE: Is it Spurs at Wembley, or against Wembley? ]

Personally, from a reader’s standpoint, I can tell you I went from, “I’d like to read what about that guy on Twitter’s career” to “Wow, I’m glad I read about that guy on Twitter’s career and I tore through the thing.” It’s not necessarily just for the love of soccer, but for the connections on a personal level. In some ways “When The Dream Became Reality” feels like a study in the sociology of soccer, and the way American personalities function within it. Moreover, it carries lessons for those who are passionate in whatever chosen field.

Given his willingness to speak his mind, Warshaw will likely spend a good long time in the American soccer world should he want to continue in media, coaching, or something else. For a better taste of his personality, here are his thoughts as PST quizzed him on his journey and the state of American soccer.

PST: You’ve starred in college, been a first round MLS SuperDraft pick on a roster, barnstormed onto the consciousness of Sweden’s top clubs as a surprise forward, dealt with promotion and relegation battles, and then came back to American soccer’s second-tier. What are the things you learned about players who “make it” versus those that don’t?

Bobby Warshaw: “I’ll give you three different things. One: some people are just really freaking good. We like to think it takes some passion or some drive but some people don’t work hard and just…. Fabian Castillo, right? Not a great teammate, but he was just really freaking good at soccer, and really fast. Some people are just born with something.

“Two: there are some guys who just by sheer force, and I was one of them, they work hard enough to get good. It’s repetitions. If you pass me a ball 10,000 times, I’m going to get decent enough at trapping it. They just stay after it every single day. They had no business being a professional except they just worked harder.

“The third part is having a coach who believed in you. You can make a World Best XI of guys who never saw the light of day just because they had a single coach. I think about this with Pulisic a lot. We think he’s great but there’s no chance that Christian Pulisic is the best 18-year-old to ever come out of this country. He’s just the only one who had a coach who played him at 18.”

(Photo by Brett Deering/Getty Images)

PST: So as someone who played at one of the best schools in the country, repped the U-17 national team out of Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania, and raved about the facilities at FC Dallas, what’s your take on player development here?

BW: “The first moral decision is what is our end game? Do we care about winning a World Cup that much that we’re willing to rob 2,000 kids a year of their high school life? Wouldn’t we all want to go back and live high school and college? And here we are taking these kids out of school and sticking them in random academies. For what? What’s our end game? To win a World Cup, which we’re probably not going to do anyway? We have a really important moral decision. Do we really want to get rid of college soccer? We’re making a huge sacrifice for something I’m not sure we will get or is worth it anyway.

“The flip side is probably the best thing that every happened to American soccer and that’s the mechanization of youth development. One thing America does really well is build machine-like enterprises. The second that Brazilians and Italians got off the streets and started playing in Academies means all of a sudden this is an industry we can compete in. Maybe everyone else having the same urge is what really helps us.”

PST: We love college soccer, but also because of the potential for atmosphere that might not come from playing a U-18 game for an academy. Do you really think the future for NCAA soccer is in jeopardy?

BW: “I’m gonna steal a line from Stanford coach Jeremy Gunn. College soccer should be the best reserve league in the world. Who’s got more money to put into something than Stanford, Maryland, Indiana, and UCLA? Why don’t we harness that and make it a real league and make it like USL, where it’s an academy for everyone 18-22?”

PST: You comment in the book about waking your sixth grade teammates up from a sleepover to have an early morning training session, so work ethic clearly wasn’t an issue for you. But what was it like when you went from Stanford student to “This is my profession” at FC Dallas?

BW: “I’m not sure I ever saw it as a profession. I knew logically that it was a profession and things happen that say it was clearly a business. For me personally it was never a profession which I think is why I always struggled so much with it. The people that accepted it was a business, I think fared much better and survived much longer. The second you get out of thinking this is living the dream, or having some wonderful passion, is what helps people survive a lot longer.

“I don’t think I made that many logical decisions about it. I’m probably going to dislike myself one way or the other, and I know I’ll dislike myself more the other way. I wish I could say I had some super logical way I thought about it, but you do what you think is right. It didn’t always work out that way, but I made the decision and went for it.”

PST: At what point did you think about those decisions making for a good book?

BW: “You read about my ex-girlfriend in the book. We’re sitting in DC last February at Politics and Prose, and I’m grabbing a book and Sarah’s there and I’m like, ‘This would be so cool to have a book.’ Then I came back from Israel and my dad made the comment, ‘Why don’t you take five months and travel the world and make this book?’ Fast forward to April, I’m in Harrisburg, practice is over at 1 o’clock, I opened my notebook in a coffee shop and I just started doing it. All of the sudden I had 10 chapters. Those were the 1, 2, 3 steps that really got the ball rolling.”

“I didn’t mean to write a real book. It was a collection of essays, the Israel story, the Brazil story, these funny things, and then the relationship chapter, the sexuality chapter, and a chapter on racism that got cut. Just basically these things I don’t feel professional players talk about honestly enough.

“Like I’m leaving professional soccer now and this is everything I have in my soul, here you go.

And then all of the sudden George Quraishi at Howler said I think we can do more, write a real story of journey and exploration and human growth and character. I said I didn’t think I have that in me but I’ll try. It grew, which was really scary because at first this book wasn’t me.”

PST: And putting it out yourself?

BW: “I didn’t think it was that big a deal. I was tired of working with managers, agents, and bosses. What can they do that I can’t? It would be nice to be in a Barnes and Noble but I didn’t write it to make money. I wrote it to tell a story. I always thought it would be cool to have a small business. Hopefully you got the theme from the book is that I’m a guy who says just go for it.”

Learn more about his book here.

Freddy Adu won’t sign with Polish club after manager lashes out

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Earlier this week, Sandecja Nowy Sacz manager Radoslaw Mrockowski blasted his club and one of its trialists: former USMNT midfielder Freddy Adu.

The 28-year-old American may be desperate to find his next top-flight club after leaving the Tampa Bay Rowdies and going on trial with the Portland Timbers, but he’s not about to stick around where he’s not wanted.

[ MORE: Watford signs Brazilian ace ]

Mrockowski compared Adu to a old vacuum cleaner and branded his club “ridiculous” for personnel moves like the trial. He also called the player “Frank” Adu, and — like the rest of us — the player doesn’t think this is a good climate to reclaim his professional name.

Adu also thanked his fans for their support.

It’s easy to make light of Adu’s career, but we’re not sure there are too many players who deserve to be made a punching bag by a prospective coach just because he doesn’t agree with the managers above him.

Mrockowski led Sandecja to promotion to Poland’s top-flight, but we’ll be surprised if he lasts much longer in the gig.

In the meantime, Adu is off to again look for his 14th club.