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Liverpool 1-1 Burnley: Clarets frustrate Reds

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  • Liverpool earn 1000th PL point
  • Arfield scores from Wood
  • Can cues up Salah for fifth

Canadian national teamer Scott Arfield put Burnley ahead, and a Mohamed Salah goal was all Liverpool could muster in a disappointing 1-1 Saturday draw with the Clarets at Anfield.

Liverpool sits seventh with eight points, while Burnley is sixth with a one-goal advantage in goal differential.

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Liverpool was lively early, and Philippe Coutinho didn’t look bothered by his long lay off.

Salah came close to winning an 18th minute penalty off James Tarkowski, but the whistle did not arrive at Anfield.

Yet it was Burnley who went ahead, with Arfield running onto a Chris Wood flicked cross and hammering his shot past Simon Mignolet in the 28th minute. The defending was again primarily responsible for an opposition goal, with the center backs sucked to Wood.

The Reds were level through Salah within three minutes, as Emre Can opened the lid on Burnley’s back line and the Egyptian took the ball to his left before firing a low shot across his body and past Clarets’ backstop Nick Pope.

Would there be history for Burnley? The Clarets had not taken a point from Liverpool since returning to the PL.

Joel Matip saved a late chance from Burnley, and Mignolet made another stop.

Pope made a terrific save on Trent Alexander-Arnold, and Dominic Solanke cranked one off the bar from in-tight moments later.

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Ranking potential 2026 World Cup host cities in USA, Mexico, Canada

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With a list of 44 potential stadiums, and 41 cities, now lined up as hosts for the 2026 World Cup in USA, Mexico and Canada, the bid for the first 48-team World Cup in history is starting to take shape.

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On Thursday a list of the 41 cities who had submitted their “official declaration of interest” to be a host city was released for the World Cup.

Of course, there is still a long way to go until the winning bid is confirmed for the tournament but the joint-bid from the three largest countries in North America is the overwhelming favorite to be backed by FIFA.

Aside from exactly how the tournament would be scheduled in terms of where group games would be played to cut down on travel, most of the noise around this potential tournament (the second on U.S. soil, first in Canada and third in Mexico) is positive.

As a reminder it is proposed the U.S. will host 60 of the 80 matches with Canada and Mexico given 10 games each, which seems a little too U.S. centric for most.

For 32-team World Cups there are usually 10-12 host stadiums but with an extra 16 teams to take part in the 2026 World Cup it is probably necessary to have at least 18-20 stadiums. And as we have seen with Gold Cup and Copa America Centenario tournaments in recent years held in the U.S. tournaments have been spread around as much as possible, so maybe there will be 20-25 host stadiums.

Now we know who wants to host World Cup games — six stadiums were submitted from Canada, three from Mexico and 35 from the USA — below is a ranking of the potential host cities based on the following factors:

  • Current soccer culture
  • Their readiness to host World Cup matches
  • How popular the host stadium would be
  • Location infrastructure

Agree? Disagree?


  1. East Rutherford, New Jersey, MetLife Stadium
  2. Mexico City, Estadio Azteca
  3. Pasadena, California, Rose Bowl
  4. Arlington, Texas, AT&T Stadium
  5. Toronto, BMO Field
  6. Atlanta, Mercedes-Benz Stadium
  7. Vancouver, Canada, BC Place
  8. Chicago, Soldier Field
  9. Houston, NRG Stadium
  10. Miami, Hard Rock Stadium
  11. Foxborough, Massachusetts, Gillette Stadium
  12. Philadelphia, Lincoln Financial Field
  13. Landover, Maryland, FedEx Field
  14. Montreal, Olympic Stadium
  15. Seattle, CenturyLink Field
  16. Denver, Sports Authority Field
  17. Santa Clara, California, Levi’s Stadium
  18. Las Vegas, Raiders stadium under construction
  19. Guadalajara, Estadio Chivas
  20. Monterrey, Estadio Rayados
  21. Inglewood, California, LA Stadium at Hollywood Park
  22. Orlando, Florida, Camping World Stadium
  23. Minneapolis, U.S. Bank Stadium
  24. Nashville, Tennessee, Nissan Stadium
  25. Charlotte, North Carolina, Bank of America Stadium
  26. New Orleans, Superdome
  27. Kansas City, Missouri, Arrowhead Stadium
  28. Tampa, Florida, Raymond James Stadium
  29. Jacksonville, Florida, EverBank Field
  30. Glendale, Arizona, University of Phoenix Stadium
  31. Dallas, Cotton Bowl
  32. Cincinnati, Paul Brown Stadium
  33. Baltimore, M&T Bank Stadium
  34. Pittsburgh, Heinz Field
  35. Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum
  36. Detroit, Ford Field
  37. Ottawa, Ontario, TD Place
  38. Salt Lake City, Rice-Eccles Stadium
  39. San Antonio, Alamodome
  40. Indianapolis, Lucas Oil Stadium
  41. Cleveland, FirstEnergy Stadium
  42. Edmonton, Alberta, Commonwealth Stadium
  43. Regina, Saskatchewan, Mosaic Stadium
  44. Birmingham, Alabama, Legion Field

List of potential North American World Cup sites narrowed

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CHICAGO (AP) Forty-one cities in the United States, Mexico and Canada have submitted preliminary bids to host 2026 World Cup matches.

The North American bid committee said Thursday its proposal will be sent to FIFA in March. The bid is expected to include up to 25 cities. At least 12 cities would ultimately be selected if the FIFA Congress picks the joint bid when it votes in June 2018.

The 2026 World Cup will be the first with a 48-nation field. Morocco said it also intends to bid.

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Three sites were dropped from the preliminary list announced last month: Calgary, Alberta; Green Bay, Wisconsin; and San Diego.

Just three stadiums that bid hosted games during the 1994 World Cup: Chicago’s Soldier Field, Dallas’ Cotton Bowl and Orlando, Florida’s Camping World Stadium, formerly known as the Citrus Bowl. Soldier Field underwent a gut renovation in 2002-03.

Two of the sites on the list hosted matches at the 1994 at stadiums that have been replaced with new venues on adjacent land: East Rutherford, New Jersey; and Foxborough; Massachusetts.

Stadiums are required to have at least 40,000 seats for group-stage matches and at least 80,000 for the opening game and final.

Thirty-two areas and 35 stadiums are on the list for the U.S. Canada has six cities and Mexico three. Three stadiums were submitted from the Los Angeles area and two from the Dallas area.

The U.S. would host 60 of 80 games, including all from the quarterfinals on.

The bidding stadiums:

UNITED STATES

Arlington, Texas, AT&T Stadium; Atlanta, Mercedes-Benz Stadium; Baltimore, M&T Bank Stadium; Birmingham, Alabama, Legion Field; Charlotte, North Carolina, Bank of America Stadium; Chicago, Soldier Field; Cincinnati, Paul Brown Stadium; Cleveland, FirstEnergy Stadium; Dallas, Cotton Bowl; Denver, Sports Authority Field; Detroit, Ford Field; East Rutherford, New Jersey, MetLife Stadium; Foxborough, Massachusetts; Glendale, Arizona, University of Phoenix Stadium; Houston, NRG Stadium; Indianapolis, Lucas Oil Stadium; Inglewood, California, LA Stadium at Hollywood Park; Jacksonville, Florida, EverBank Field; Kansas City, Missouri, Arrowhead Stadium; Landover, Maryland, FedEx Field; Las Vegas, Raiders stadium under construction; Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum; Miami, Hard Rock Stadium; Minneapolis, U.S. Bank Stadium; Nashville, Tennessee, Nissan Stadium; New Orleans, Superdome; Orlando, Florida, Camping World Stadium; Pasadena, California, Rose Bowl; Philadelphia, Lincoln Financial Field; Pittsburgh, Heinz Field; Salt Lake City, Rice-Eccles Stadium; San Antonio, Alamodome; Santa Clara, California, Levi’s Stadium; Seattle, CenturyLink Field; Tampa, Florida, Raymond James Stadium

CANADA

Edmonton, Alberta, Commonwealth Stadium; Montreal, Olympic Stadium; Ottawa, Ontario, TD Place; Regina, Saskatchewan, Mosaic Stadium; Toronto, BMO Field; Vancouver, British Columbia, BC Place

MEXICO

Guadalajara, Estadio Chivas; Mexico City, Estadio Azteca; Monterrey, Estadio Rayados.

Morocco announces bid for 2026 World Cup

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It appears the combined USA/Mexico/Canada World Cup 2026 bid will have some competition.

On deadline day, the Moroccan Football Federation announced its interest in also hosting the 2026 World Cup. FIFA announced in May that August 11 was the deadline for federations to “express their interest” in hosting the international tournament.

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In a short statement, the Moroccan FF said, “The Royal Moroccan Football Federation officially launched on Friday (August 11th, 2017) a bid to host the 2026 World Cup. The committee has put the file of its nomination to the committees competent in this file at FIFA in order to embrace global football.”

It was originally expected that only the U.S./Mexico/Canada bid would be in the running for the 2026 World Cup, but now it appears that the U.S. will have a little bit of competition, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing.

While the U.S. and Brazil are completely different countries and cultures, there was no competition to the Brazil World Cup bid and as a result, the local (and allegedly corrupt) organizing committee members fell behind quickly on stadium projects, forcing there to be last minute changes at the 2013 Confederations Cup when some of the stadiums weren’t ready in time.

The U.S. bid however is still the most likely to win the World Cup rights, with the relative ease it will take the U.S., Mexico and Canada to host a 48-team World Cup.

North America hasn’t hosted a World Cup since 1994, while South Africa hosted the World Cup in 2010 to represent the African continent.

Jamaica 2-1 Canada: Reggae Boyz reach 2nd straight Gold Cup semifinals

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Two years after their stunning finals appearance, Jamaica is back into the Gold Cup semifinals after holding off Junior Hoilett and Canada 2-1.

Shaun Francis put Jamaica in front just five minutes into the match, as Darren Mattocks expertly cut back to the far side of the box where Francis was trailing the play, and the Montreal Impact full-back put the Reggae Boyz in front.

There was no more action until past the halftime break. Jamaica doubled its lead thanks to a superb strike by Romario Williams, who leaned back and rifled one off the hands of goalkeeper Milan Borjan and into the top corner.

Darren Mattocks got his second assist of the game on the goal with his little nudge backwards to Williams at the top of the box.

The two-goal cushion wouldn’t last long, however, as the fireworks show continued. Now, it was Canada’s turn to put on a show as Junior Hoilett stunned the crowd with a long-distance curler from even further outside the box than Williams’ just 11 minutes earlier.

That would do it for the scoring, although the show wasn’t completely over. With just 15 minutes left, Hoilett unleashed another would-be stunner, but Andre Blake matched the shot with a spectacular save, getting his fingertips to the shot to keep it out.

Blake was critical down the stretch to squelch any chances Canada had late as they pushed for an equalizer. The Reggae Boyz held on to reach the semifinal, where they will take on either Mexico or Honduras.