PST Man of the Match: Eddie Johnson edges Brad Evans

Leave a comment

There was no shortage of standouts for Seattle tonight. Moving forward from the back: Djmii Traoré made some strong reads in central defense; DeAndre Yedlin got the best of Deshorn Brown down the right; Osvaldo Alonso gave his typically outstanding performance at the base of midfield; and Clint Dempsey had his best game as a Sounder.

But when thinking about Seattle’s Man of the Match in Wednesday’s win over Colorado, two players stand out: Brad Evans, who scored a wonderful opening goal, his right-footed blast in the 28th minute proving the game-winner; and Eddie Johnson, whose ability to go wide and open up Colorado’s defense was vital, even before he scored the game-icing goal.

A Man of the Match post can only have one winner, so Eddie Johnson is our guy, but in any other space this should be a toss up. Both U.S. internationals played integral parts in Seattle’s first round success.

source: AP
Brad Evans (left) and Eddie Johnson (middle) both gave Man of the Match caliber performances on Wednesday night. (Photo: AP Photo.)

So why EJ over B-Rad? That 93rd minute goal helps, though that score was neither as important nor as difficult as Evans’. But between that, his part in the first goal, and the crucial role he played going into  wide areas to provide the width Seattle needed to stretch the Colorado back line, he may have done enough to transcend Evans’ well-hit opener.

That’s not to say the goal was the Seattle midfielder’s only contribution. He was one of the main factors in Seattle’s early success through the middle of the park, an aspect that allowed the Sounders to control the game while cutting off the connection between the Rapids’ holders and playmaker Martín Rivero. In the 18th minute, a beautifully lofted ball over left-center back German Mera would have created a chance if Johnson didn’t lose possession while trapping the pass. Evans was so much more than the goal.

But pressed into service at right back, Evans had some trouble with Deshorn Brown, who DeAndre Yedlin neutralized (and exploited) in the first half. Evans deserves huge credit for being able to drop back into defense, but when Brown got a step on him to launch a 56th minute shot toward goal, it looked like Evans would become a liability. (He did not. Brown was eventually subbed off.)

Johnson, on the other hand, was a force all night. He played a part in the third minute chance that saw Adam Moffat test Clint Irwin early. His holdup play helped Seattle transition the few times they couldn’t work through Clint Dempsey. And perhaps most importantly, his ability to go wide and threatened helped create seems in a Colorado defense that seemed intent on staying narrow. Like Evans, Johnson’s versatility was a virtue, forcing the Rapids out of their comfort zone.

In the 28th minute, that wide play helped Seattle get on the board. It was Johnson that was toward the left edge of the area (just outside the box) when Dempsey played out of midfield at the edge of the final third. Johnson played the ball wide for Leo González before trying to contribute to the chaos in the middle that drew attention away from Evans, who converted his chance.

In stoppage time, after Seattle had gone down a man, Johnson got his name on the scoresheet, icing the game in the process. While it originally looked like ball sent behind the right of Colorado’s defense would give him a chance to waste valuable time, Johnson turned toward goal and killed the game off another way. One-on-one with Clint Irwin, Johnson finished inside the right post to make it 2-0.

Go ahead and take your pick between Evans and Johnson, but when you look at all of the Seattle striker’s contributions, there’s a case to be made that he did enough to pass Evans’ all-important opener. Whether that’s true or not, it’s still a case we’re buying …

Though as you can see, Evans is getting plenty of love elsewhere under the NBC umbrella:

[MORE: Evans blast, Johnson insurance sees Seattle past Colorado, into the Western Conference semifinals]

[MORE: How it happened: More details on Seattle’s big win over Colorado]

Three Good Questions for: Seattle midfielder Brad Evans

1 Comment

TUKWILA, Wash. — Splitting his career between Columbus and the Pacific Northwest, Brad Evans has never been in a position to command attention, a status that made him a selection for the U.S. Men’s National Team squad for their World Cup Qualifier in Honduras. For most Major League Soccer fans, Evans is a decent player but not somebody who was on their “USMNT” radars.

Watch Evans over the course of a season and you see values that transcend decent, Take his versatility, for example. Last season, Evans played all across the midfield. He played central defense and fullback. Within games, as Sigi Schmid tried to put Mauro Rosales and Christian Tiffert in their most advantageous positions, Evans filled in the gaps.

We even saw points where Evans became an outright attacking winger, as he did early in Seattle’s Aug. 25 win at Chivas USA. He’s 10th minute goal was one of four he scored last season.

With the acquisition of Shalrie Joseph potentially pushing the 27-year-old out of central midfield, Evans’s versatility may again be tested in 2013. Earlier this week we caught up with Evans to talk about that as part of our Three Good Questions:

You were a guy who performed a lot of different roles last year for the team, filled in where needed. What do you see your role being this year, particularly with the acquisition of Shalrie?

Obviously Shalrie is a tremendous player. [He’s] somebody who, when I first got in the league, was one or maybe two guys who I really looked up to and said if I can model a career after him I’d be doing pretty good. He’s a guy when you’re playing against you say ‘God, I have to play against this guy today. I’ve got to put in my best effort because he’ll make you look stupid.’

To have him on the team is a blessing because he’ll provide either depth or maybe he starts in a starting role and maybe some positions are moved around a little bit. But either way I’ve always been a team-first guy. Wherever I play, I play, and the bottom line is I want to win.

(AUTHOR: Even if that means putting in time at right back?)

Yeah, wherever. Put some gloves on me, man. I just want to win the game. Anything to make the team better is what I’m about.

Now that you’re a part of the national team setup, is where you play a little bit more of a concern?

The first thing they said was versatility is going to be key in moving forward with the national team. You’ve noticed a couple of injuries at right back, with Cherundolo getting injured. Maybe suspensions, something like that. These things are going to happen.

It’s better to be ready and be mentally prepared to play any position. Like I played in the Canada game. I started at center mid then moved and played 45 minutes at right back.

For me, nothing changes. My mindset stays the same. One week I’ll play center mid. Next week, I’ll play center back. Doesn’t matter. I’m going to prepare the same way. I’m going to play the same way.

It’s about being a student of the game, most importantly. Hopefully, it pays off.

All the West’s powers have had turnover this year except for San Jose, and they’ve got half their team injured, it seems like. How do you assess the West from your point of view, particularly those top four teams?

It’s tough to assess. Some fans will look at it [and say] ‘We beat Salt Lake twice this preseason, so that’s a wash. We’ll beat them three times.’ That’s just not how it is.

Teams get hot at different times. People will get healthy at the right time. I’m sure we’ll have our injuries througout the season.

It’s a long season. You try not to approach it and look at the big picture too much. We like to focus on this Saturday.

In the past, that’s benefitted us. We’ll focus on what lies ahead, and then if we get closer to Supporters’ Shield or regaining the Open Cup – wherever it is, then we’ll look at that when it comes.

Right now, I’d like to be focused on what he have here, try to build our team, and when we cross that path, we’ll deal with it then.

With Osvaldo Alonso suspended for the season opener, Evans will likely be in his customary central midfield position Saturday against Monday. He’ll probably see time at right back, once Sharlie Joseph is match fit in a month. You’ll see him play wide in midfield, and those one or two times randomness rears it’s mercurial head this season, you’ll see him in central defense.

That might mean his contributions get overlooked, but it also means he has a route into the national team.