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Arena should give Ream a look in Brooks’ absence

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With John Brooks out three months thanks to a horribly timed thigh injury, the United States yet again has to scramble to fill a void at the back. It’s not the first time an injury to Brooks has left the USMNT scrambling for cover at a thin position.

In the successful Gold Cup this past summer, with a largely domestic squad in place, Omar Gonzalez saw the bulk of the time at central defender, with Matt Besler his partner through the final two matches. However, with European-based players now in contention for spots with the early September international break, those two are unlikely to continue, at least not together.

[ MORE: Liverpool holds all the cards in Coutinho transfer ]

The most obvious choice to start September 1st against Costa Rica and likely shoo-in should he remain healthy for the next two weeks is Geoff Cameron. The 32-year-old has been back and forth between defense and midfield with club and country, and although he has publicly acknowledged his preference for a spot higher up the pitch, he was used in a back-three in Stoke City’s Premier League opener last weekend and is steadiest at the back.

But with a spot next to Cameron up for grabs in Brooks’ absence, a player who should get serious consideration is United States fill-in extraordinaire Tim Ream.

Ream has had to work hard to earn his place with the U.S., and while he’s seen time of late, he’s not been a first-choice pick. The 29-year-old has four caps so far in 2017, with two of those starts, including one in the impressive 1-1 draw against Mexico at the Azteca with the US still clawing its way back up the Hex standings. Even then, Ream would likely not have earned that spot had Arena not chosen to rotate nearly the entire squad between the pair of qualifiers in that window. His other start this year, the 1-1 draw at Panama, only came after Cameron pulled out of the squad the day of the game with a late injury. The last time Ream started back-to-back matches for the U.S. came back in 2015 when he was somewhat of a regular through the second half of the calendar year.

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But now, with Brooks out, Ream looks like the perfect man to fill in again. The 29-year-old defender finished last season in top form as Fulham narrowly missed out on promotion, earning the official website’s Man of the Match award in a May 2nd draw with Brentford, and won it again in the club’s final match of the season.

Without missing a beat, Ream has picked up where he left off last campaign in the first few matches this month. Last weekend against Reading at the Madjeski Stadium, Ream’s center-back partner Tomas Kalas was sent off 36 seconds into the match, forcing Fulham to play a man down for 89 minutes. Ream and company solidified the back, conceding just once in the 61st minute en route to a 1-1 draw.

The club still likely requires reinforcements at the CB position – Ream was forced to partner with right-back Denis Odoi against Reading with Kalas suspended and Michael Madl injured – meaning Ream could see an influx of competition in the coming weeks. However, as it stands, the American is far and away the best (and most improved) central defender on a club favored for promotion.

Gonzalez performed well in the Gold Cup, and Matt Besler was serviceable, but with few other options in the heart of defense to take Brooks’ place, Bruce Arena could yet again look to Ream for an in-form replacement.

Brooks scores as Wolfsburg downs Ream’s Fulham

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It was a battle of USMNT defenders as John Brooks took on Tim Ream in a London friendly at Craven Cottage, with the former coming out on top as Wolfsburg won 3-0. The US defender opened the scoring, while Mario Gomez put on the finishing touches with a brace late in the second half.

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Brooks took the early advantage as his looping header gave Wolfsburg the lead midway through the first half. The chance came on a set-piece as Daniel Davidi picked up the assist from his free-kick.

Ream started and was paired with Chelsea loanee Tomas Kalas for much of the match, until being substituted off with 79 minutes to go. Brooks also started, alongside 25-year-old Wolfsburg youth product Robin Knoche, and went the full 90 minutes.

Brooks joined Wolfsburg this summer for a $20 million fee, which is more than Fulham has ever spent on a player. The German club has looked good in preseason, with the club’s typical goalscoring flair looking to have returned, a season after narrowly avoiding relegation after losing its attacking touch.

Fulham’s defense, meanwhile, has been quite leaky all preseason, although Ream has not been in the lineup for much of it as manager Slavisa Jokanovic has looked to test out his other defensive options. They conceded a massive eight-goal total to Chelsea in a training session at Cobham, and then allowed a pair of goals in games against West Ham, Darmstadt, and now Wolfsburg.

Premier League vet Scott Parker calls quits on playing career

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Scott Parker has announced his retirement from soccer after a stellar 20-plus year career in England.

[ MORE: Chile bests Portugal on PKs to reach Confed Cup final ]

The 36-year-old spent almost the entirety of his career in the Premier League, and played with seven teams during his time on the pitch.

“I believe now is the right time to move on to the next chapter in my life and career,” Parker said in a statement.

“I feel incredibly honoured and proud to have enjoyed the career that I have and I’ve loved every moment of it.”

Parker began playing with Charlton after coming up through the team’s youth academy, before completing a move to Chelsea in 2004.

Throughout his career, Parker also spent time at Newcastle, West Ham and Tottenham, before finishing up at Fulham this past season.

How Fulham rebuilt their Premier League dreams

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Fulham Football Club will remain in the Championship.

The club that reached a Europa League final in 2010 is still battling to recover from its tumultuous faceplant a few seasons ago.

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The Whites came close to a Premier League return this week, falling by a single goal as so many have to a scrappy, rigid Reading side in the playoff semifinal. Forced to remain vigilant another season, they are primed for another run at the top flight.

Every club has a story. Fulham’s was storybook: bought by Mohamed Al Fayed in 1997, the club was in the third tier of English football and spiraling down further. Smart hires and an injection of cash spent in the right places changed that all, and within four seasons they had risen to the top flight where they would stick for a decade. The incredible run in 2010 inspired a fanbase to dream even bigger, high on the increasing level of success each new year brought.

Then, it all went wrong.

Al Fayed’s old age and failing health convinced him to sell, and in the process of shoring up the books, an 18-month dry spell caused the club to spoil in the summer heat, suddenly vulnerable. Panic does funny things to a team in crisis. They hired a crazy German manager. They signed an expensive yet broken striker. They were relegated from the PL in 2014. The next season, with hopes of starting fresh in the Championship, the club finished 20th and supporters had nightmares to two decades earlier.

Fast-forward to today and the Whites, despite their playoff stumble, look more and more prepared for a slow build to ready themselves not just for a top flight return but another lengthy stay, something only accomplished by years of preparation. The Premier League beckons.

“I’m really just interested in preserving the club and honoring the history and tradition of the club,” Tony Khan, Fulham’s Director of Football Operations and son of American owner Shad Khan, insists. “But also [I’m] trying to get the club hopefully to heights it’s never seen before.”

What happened? What changed? What went right when it all seemed to be going wrong?


POSSESS YOUR FATE

Fulham was unable to break down Reading, scoring just one goal over the course of both semifinal legs. The Championship playoffs are soccer’s version of the Hunger Games; only one can advance beyond the mire while the others are forgotten to time.

The Championship itself is a ruthless libretto – known dramatically as a physical gauntlet that sees only the toughest survive. Fulham under Slavisa Jokanovic, however, completely buck that ideal, playing a possession-heavy style of football that at its best manufactures a sparkling on-field product with brilliant goals and alluring flow.

That wasn’t the case until recently.

Last season, Fulham finished 20th in the table, largely thanks to an aging squad that couldn’t keep the ball and a leaky defense that carried over from its Premier League relegation. This year, with Jokanovic’s instruction and the bevy of new signings, Fulham held 57 percent possession and completed passes at an 87 percent rate, both of which shatter the numbers the Championship has seen over the last four years.

So how did they finish 6th, barely snagging the final playoff position?

“I think one of the big things we’ve seen over the course of the season is they’ve definitely learned and gotten better,” said Ted Knutson, owner of StatsBomb.com and an analytics professional with a heavy following on social media.

The results back up that claim. Fulham struggled to open the season, particularly through a brutal six-game stretch of winless league play in September.

“[We] took a lot of personal abuse when we came on and started to apply these things,” Khan said, “and now I’ve seen a lot of people turn around and see that we weren’t doing anything bad, and maybe what we were doing wasn’t so crazy.”

Fans weren’t happy that a career mathematician was taking over their club. They blissfully ignored that for years he had focused all his brainpower on sports.


BOYS OF SUMMER

Following the close call with relegation back to League One, it was clear that something had to change at Fulham. The players brought in were talented individuals, but they weren’t coming together.

“Their recruitment had been so bad that they had to improve,” Knutson said of Fulham’s past few seasons. “They literally had to. It’s a reversion to the mean. With the amount of money that’s in that club, they couldn’t have gotten much worse. This was just an impetus to help them make better decisions.”

That impetus was the addition of Tony Khan full-time.

Tony had been working with his father’s NFL team the Jacksonville Jaguars in the player recruitment and identification department with an analytics and technology focus, and before that in basketball and baseball analytics with his own company TruMedia.

While Tony had been heavily involved in player identification with the Jaguars in the past, this was the first time he had been truly given roster control with any team.

With him, Tony brought his analytics models and experience, and implemented the “both boxes checked” system of player recruitment. This helped merge traditional scouting and analytics to create a list of targeted players who passed the test in both categories.

It didn’t go over so well with fans.

“There are some people that have written some really nasty letters to me last summer and early in the season and even again in January,” Tony said. “In the past week multiple people have written me to say they’re very sorry about the things they said, they can’t believe they said those things, they’re very apologetic, and they see now what we’re trying to do; that we weren’t trying to stomp on tradition or do anything negative, that we really believe in what we’re doing. This might be different than the way things have traditionally been done but we think this is a good system that will help the club.”

Unfortunately, that fiery backlash wasn’t an isolated incident.

“We had the exact same thing happen down the road,” Knutson, a former employee in Brentford’s player recruitment department, said. “It is partly natural for that to happen; if the fans don’t understand quite what’s going on, it’s tougher for them to associate with and accept it. Also, most of the time when analytics is talked about these days, it’s talked about as sort of a flameout. Like the Damien Comolli Liverpool period, or ‘why hasn’t it helped Arsenal win the league?’ and the clubs that are doing it well tend to keep it under the radar.”

Thankfully for Fulham, the introduction of Khan’s methodology and direction had an immediate positive impact.

The front office overhauled the roster at an almost inconceivable level. Of the 49,386 minutes played by Fulham players last season, nearly 40,000 of those departed the club. In their place came attacking flair in Sone Aluko, Floyd Ayite, Neeskens Kebano, and Lucas Piazon plus a wildly successful midfield partnership in Kevin McDonald and Stefan Johansen.

“They mostly got it right,” Knutson said. “Kebano has been excellent, and their midfield has been really stout, and that might be the most important part in the Championship. Johansen and McDonald are top class midfielders that have stabilized the whole club.”

To finance this, the club sold striker Ross McCormack for a Championship record $15.5 million to Aston Villa. That decision came with significant risk, as McCormack had carried Fulham the previous season with a whopping 23 league goals, but the sale in hindsight was a massive success given his utterly disastrous campaign this year.

They offloaded bigger names in Maarten Stekelenburg, Kostas Mitroglou, and Ben Pringle. They let go aging players in Fernando Amorebieta and Jamie O’Hara. They also fleeced Cardiff City in a straight swap of full-backs, giving away former Swansea flop Jazz Richards in exchange for Scott Malone. Of the 66 goals scored by the club last season among all competitions, they retained 10.

Little of this would have taken place without Tony Khan and his influence.


ANALYZING THE GAME

Tony Khan – and his right-hand man Craig Kline – started working in sports analytics at the University of Illinois. He began working in basketball out of college studying statistical models, and came to football while his father began exploring options to purchase an NFL team.

By the time Shad Khan had bought the Jaguars, his son was fully immersed in sports metrics, and was given a role in the player identification department both implementing his own statistical models and helping to develop technology to further the department.

Khan also purchased TruMedia, a company that is heavily involved in professional sports metrics across a number of fronts, particularly in Major League Baseball.

In a nutshell, this isn’t Tony’s first rodeo. But it’s certainly his biggest. The transition was slow, as Tony took time between responsibilities with the Jaguars to implement the analytics department over the past year and a half. At first the internal response was slow, but since his full-time appointment things have really taken off.

“Going into this previous summer was the first time I really took it over and took the lead on it,” Tony said. “Since I’ve taken responsibility for [transfers], things have really gone in a great direction, I’m really proud of that.”

The implementation of analytics is growing across Europe. However, it’s facing plenty of roadblocks. It’s hard to figure out why.

“What’s wrong with more information?” Knutson asked. “How can that be wrong?”

While some sectors refuse to embrace the wave, others have welcomed it. Many of those clubs are American influenced from the top down, such as Liverpool, Arsenal, and Roma. Tony’s presence at Fulham has added the club to that list.

“Fulham are a fairly rich club in terms of what’s possible in the Championship,” said Knutson. “It took them a long time to figure out and actually make the changes. That’s not me being critical of the Khans – in many cases it’s better to take the time learning before making sweeping changes because then you’re less likely to make mistakes and you’re more likely to do it in a way that’s both acceptable and effective. So for Fulham to come along and do this has been very valuable.”

“It’s intrinsic in the American ideals that fit with sport, not just with football but with sport.”


LIGHT THE MATCH

“I’m here because I believe in the club,” Khan said. “I could be working at a number of different places and I love the Fulham Football Club and I’m here because I want to be here and I believe in the club.”

That’s a growing sentiment, but it’s not quite there yet. More and more statistics and metrics are beginning to meander their way into mainstream use. Chalkboards are popping up on social media. Knutson’s social media following has increased as his radar boards gain popularity.

“I do think the success we’ve had this season has opened a lot of people’s minds,” Khan said, “and led to many people that did not have a positive opinion on the place of analytics in player evaluation and recruitment in European football to see that it’s not such a bad thing and it can actually be very useful when applied properly as I think we have.”

There’s no magical formula or supercomputer that can solve every club’s problems.

The concept has always been to provide those tasked with critical choices with as much information as possible to increase the chances of making the right decision. As money in the game flows in, the weight those decisions carry become larger, and thus the need for additional help increases.

“I think the rest of Europe is starting to catch on, and it feels like there’s grass out there, and it’s all really dry, and it’s just waiting,” Knutson said with a snap of his fingers, “for a match to spark it.”

Tony Khan and Fulham have plenty of work to do this summer.

Upgrades are likely needed both up front and at the back, and keeping hold of the squad’s best players will be an accomplishment. Midfield playmaker Tom Cairney in particular is a gem wanted by many Premier League clubs, and maintaining his loyalty for another season in the Championship will be a true challenge. Jokanovic will no doubt be a marked man.

Nevertheless, the club continues looking for the light at the end of the tunnel, and with embracing advanced metrics, they hope for a leg up on the rest of the Championship rabble.

Reading defeats Fulham, one win from the Premier League

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Jaap Stam’s first foray into management is going very well.

The Reading boss has his club one win from the Premier League after a Yann Kermorgant penalty lifted the Royals to a 1-0 second leg win over Fulham in the Championship playoff semifinal at the Madejski Stadium on Tuesday.

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Stam played for Manchester United, Ajax, AC Milan, Lazio, and PSV Eindhoven, so promotion campaigns aren’t old hat for him, but Reading has won better than 54 percent of its matches with him in charge.

The Royals will face either Sheffield Wednesday or Huddersfield Town at Wembley Stadium on May 29 in the “Richest Game in Football.” Here’s Stam on Reading:

“It’s great to work with a club that’s got a lot of potential and with players willing to work really hard to get somewhere.

“To get this result today – against a very good team by the way – I’m very happy with that.

“Fulham have got a lot of threats. In the first half, we did quite well. In the second half, we started well. Then they’re controlling the game and we needed to defend. We needed to dig in.”

Could Stam be managing against his former club in the Premier League next season?