Germany

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Bayern, Leipzig drawn against each other in German Cup

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BERLIN (AP) Bayern Munich and Leipzig will face each other in the second round of the German Cup, and Borussia Dortmund will continue its title defense against third-division Magdeburg.

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Sunday’s draw also paired Bundesliga rivals Cologne at Hertha Berlin, Hoffenheim at Werder Bremen and Wolfsburg at Hannover.

Schweinfurt, the only remaining fourth-tier side, faces last season’s finalist Eintracht Frankfurt. Third division Osnabrueck, which knocked Hamburger SV out in the first round, plays second-division Nuremberg at home. Schalke visits third-tier Wehen Wiesbaden and Fortuna Duesseldorf will host Borussia Moenchengladbach.

The games are scheduled to be played on Oct. 24 and 25.

First female ref set to take charge in Bundesliga

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BERLIN (AP) After a decade in Germany’s second division, Bibiana Steinhaus will make Bundesliga history this season by becoming the first woman to referee in the country’s top flight.

The 38-year-old police officer is among four referees to have been promoted by the German football federation (DFB) into the league’s elite group of 24.

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“For every referee, whether man or woman, the dream is to be able to referee in the Bundesliga. I worked very hard toward that goal and had some setbacks over the past few years, so I’m very happy about the referees’ commission’s confidence,” Steinhaus said when her promotion was announced in May. “It shows that the performance-principle also applies in the field of referees.”

The daughter of a referee, she began by officiating women’s games for the DFB in 1999. Steinhaus then became a FIFA referee in 2005 and earned her place in the second division in 2007, as the first female referee in German professional football, before securing her latest promotion.

During that time, Steinhaus has handled women’s World Cups and European Championships, along with the gold medal match between the United States and Japan at the 2012 Olympics in London. Last June, she took charge of the women’s Champions League final between Lyon and Paris Saint-Germain.

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Of her 80 matches in Germany’s second tier, all but one went off without a hitch for Steinhaus. After sending off Kerem Demirbay in 2015, the then-Fortuna Duesseldorf midfielder reportedly told her: “Women have no place in men’s football.”

Demirbay was roundly criticized for the remark and handed a three-game ban with two further games suspended. Duesseldorf also made Demirbay referee a girls’ game to ensure he understood the message.

Demirbay apologized both publicly and to Steinhaus directly for his comment, and said he was “very happy that she accepted my apology.” The 24-year-old player is likely to meet Steinhaus again this season if she takes charge of any games involving his current club, Hoffenheim.

However, Steinhaus is already aware that she may be treated differently to other referees. During Bayern Munich’s game against Chemnitzer FC in the German Cup last Saturday, she had one of her bootlaces untied by Bayern winger Franck Ribery as he pretended to put the ball in place for a free kick.

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She laughed it off by giving Ribery a couple of playful punches in response, but it is debatable whether the France winger would have untied the bootlace if he had been dealing with a male referee.

“She laughed, that’s positive,” Ribery told broadcaster ARD afterward. “It was a joke, but you always have to respect the other.”

It wasn’t Steinhaus’ first run-in with someone from Bayern. As the fourth official during a league game in 2014, she shrugged off Pep Guardiola‘s hand from her shoulder as the then-Bayern coach got animated over a decision.

Report: Aron Johannsson could be on his way out at Werder Bremen

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Aron Johannsson has had a rough spell of injuries since moving to Germany, and now the U.S. Men’s National Team forward could be looking for a new club.

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Since joining Bundesliga side Werder Bremen two years ago, Johannsson has scored just three goals in 15 appearances after previously shining in the Dutch Eredivisie with AZ Alkmaar.

Bremen sporting director Frank Baumann admits that Johannsson has been seeking out more playing time since returning to the field, and that there is “interest from other clubs.”

“Aron has laid claim to playing, and we have always said there is competition,” Baumann told German outlet Kicker. “Aron has said he will have to give thought to his future when he’s not playing. We’ll see what happens in the next days and weeks.

“Aron is a player who sparks interest from other clubs, but it’s up to him to evaluate what is of interest to him.”

Johannsson was last called up by the USMNT in 2015 while former manager Jurgen Klinsmann was still in charge, however, a number of injuries and lack of consistent playing time have certainly affected his status with the Stars and Stripes.

Bayern’s technical director Reschke leaves to join Stuttgart

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MUNICH (AP) Bayern Munich’s technical director, Michael Reschke, is leaving to join promoted Stuttgart as sporting director.

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Bayern says that the 59-year-old Reschke, who joined the club in 2014 after 10 years at Bayer Leverkusen, asked for his contract to be terminated on Friday. It had had another year to run. Reschke informed both president Uli Hoeness and chairman Karl-Heinz Rummenigge in July that he had received offers from other clubs.

On Monday, Bayern appointed Hasan Salihamidzic in a role with duties that may have overlapped with Reschke’s, but the Stuttgart-bound director says, “It’s a shame I won’t have the opportunity to work together with (him).”

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Rummenigge thanked Reschke for “the tremendous work he’s done for FC Bayern over the last three years. He’s made an important contribution to our success.”

Culture shift? Tournament of Nations has three female coaches

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An ongoing shift in women’s soccer has been apparent at the Tournament of Nations – not on the field but on the sidelines.

Three of the four teams participating in the international event have female coaches, a rare majority in soccer.

A year ago, the two teams playing for the gold medal at the Rio Olympics were both led by women, Sweden’s Pia Sundhage and Germany’s Silvia Neid. And Jill Ellis led the U.S. national team to the Women’s World Cup title in Canada the year before.

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Ellis and others in the sport believe that recent events show women are making important and necessary gains in soccer – but there’s more work to be done.

“I think it’s forward-thinking federations that are about hiring competent coaches but also willing to provide opportunities,” Ellis said. “I know we’ve recently hired technical advisers for our academies and they’re all female and I think that’s great. We’ve got to have more coaches out there and more role models for young coaches. I think it’s great.”

The inaugural Tournament of Nations concludes on Thursday night in Carson, California. The U.S. women rallied from a 3-1 deficit to beat Brazil 4-3 on Sunday in San Diego and will face Japan in the tournament’s final match.

U.S. Soccer hopes to host the tournament each summer that there isn’t a World Cup or Olympic competition. In addition to Ellis, Emily Lima is the new coach for Brazil and Asako Takakura manages Japan. The only male coach in the event is Australia’s Alen Stajcic.

Lima and Takakura are former players who are relatively new to their teams: Lima took over Brazil last fall following the Olympics and Takakura was appointed after Japan failed to make the field for Rio. Both are the first female coaches for their teams.

Another sign of a possible culture shift in the sport: Five of the top 10 teams in FIFA’s world rankings are coached by women.

The trend has not been lost on Moya Dodd, a former Australian national team standout and vice president of the Asian Football Confederation who has been a vocal advocate for women’s soccer.

“When given the opportunity, women coaches are phenomenally successful. All but one of the World Cups, Olympic golds and Euros in women’s football since 2000 have been won by female-coached teams,” Dodd said, adding that’s 11 of 12 tournaments at the sport’s highest level.

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However, Dodd said any shift is far less apparent below the senior national team level and at the club level, where female coaches are scarcer.

For example, among the 10 National Women’s Soccer League teams, there’s just one female head coach: Laura Harvey of the Seattle Reign.

Dodd also points to the NCAA, where the number of women coaches has dropped. A recent study of women’s collegiate teams by the University of Minnesota gave soccer a “D” grade with just 26.2 percent of teams with female coaches in 2016-17, a drop from the previous season.

“In the U.S.A., the percentage of female college athletes coached by women has halved since Title IX was introduced. It seems that women face barriers that grow higher as women’s sports become bigger,” Dodd said.

In an email exchange with The Associated Press, Dodd added that she sees unconscious bias as one of the biggest obstacles women much overcome.

“The characteristics that are seen as assets in a male coach – being tough, having strong opinions, or yelling at players (like Alex Ferguson’s famous `hairdryer’ treatment) would characterize a woman as difficult, emotional or hysterical,” she wrote. “Yet if she is motherly and caring, she doesn’t fit the definition of a coach. In other words, gender stereotypes work against her at both ends.”

At the UEFA Women’s European Championship, there are six women coaches among the 16 teams that took part. Of the four teams playing in Thursday’s semifinals – England, the Netherlands, Denmark and Austria – one has a female head coach, Sarina Wiegman (Netherlands).

The women’s Euros are played every four years as the premier competition in the UEFA Confederation. In the last edition, four of the 12 teams were coached by women.

Japan’s Takakura gave added perspective when it comes to female coaches: they should be treated the same as men.

“From my point of view I think it’s good news to have female coaches,” she said through a translator. “But as a coach the gender doesn’t really matter; it doesn’t matter if it’s a he or a she. As a coach, you have to educate and develop your players.”