Louis van Gaal

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Van Gaal: Man United “put my head in noose,” Mourinho slams past

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Louis Van Gaal is not a man who forgets those who have wronged him.

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The legendary Dutch coach, 66, has spoken out about his firing from Manchester United in the summer of 2016, hours after he led the Red Devils to FA Cup success.

LVG, who led United to fourth and fifth place finishes in his two seasons in charge at Old Trafford, was fired a year early after he signed a three-year contract in 2014 to lead United back to glory.

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That didn’t happen with a bland playing style lambasted by a large majority of United’s fans and now van Gaal, speaking to the Daily Mirror, has finally lifted the lid on how he felt about his firing.

“United put my head in a noose and I was publicly placed on the gallows. The pressure was enormous with my head in the noose and they went right behind my back. I think it was all orchestrated like a film and it was done very much behind my back right from January,” van Gaal said. “My wife, Truus, told me that the attitude of the board had changed. Women have this intuition. They smell it. I denied it, even to my wife, because between me as a manager and the chief executive Ed Woodward, everything was running as normal.”

Van Gaal then revealed that he would have been fine with Jose Mourinho taking over from him at the end of the 2015-16 season but that United never consulted him about the decision and therefore he demanded he was paid the final year of his salary. He also slammed former players for “yapping in the media” about United’s “boring” style of play.

“They told me only after it was leaked out and it was the biggest disappointment of my life,” van Gaal added. “United did not discuss this with me. If they had come to me with the Mourinho plan then I could have said ‘okay, let’s give it everything for the last six months, complete commitment to each other and the team and then Jose Mourinho can take over.’ They could have saved the last year of my salary by doing that but after what happened I made them pay every penny.”

Mourinho was appointed LVG’s successor and although he had previously been complimentary of the man who worked with at Barcelona in the past, the Portuguese coach had this to say to the Sunday Times when asked about van Gaal’s regime and that of David Moyes before him at United.

“There was an evolution in the other clubs; there was no evolution in this club. In all the areas that make a team successful, I think we stopped in time,” Mourinho said. “That was quite an empty period in the club with no evolution in areas that are important. It was the weight of the past on the shoulders of the players, managers, even boards, even probably owners, because when you are used to ‘win and win and win’, and suddenly you stop, it’s like a heavy burden.”

*Grabs popcorn*

Mourinho: Van Gaal left good team, but I brought belief

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Jose Mourinho and Manchester United are bringing happiness to the Liberty Stadium on Sunday, or at least more of it.

The United boss says the club’s turnaround is emotionally-based, and that the cupboard certainly wasn’t bare when he took over the Red Devils last summer.

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United finished fifth in the Premier League last season, tied for fourth with Man City and 15 points back of Arsenal. Mourinho’s men sit in the same spot this year, but are in the semifinals of the Europa League, have won the League Cup, and have the door open to the Top Four.

So what’s different? Here’s the boss, from the BBC:

“I think Mr. Van Gaal left a good group of boys with very good relations between them.

“[But] I think they missed happiness, they missed trust, belief, this extra bit that brings resilience, brings fight and they have it [now].”

It’s been a bit of a roller coaster with the Bastian Schweinsteiger and Luke Shaw drama, but — like any new manager — Mourinho did have to sort the club. Now we wonder whether he’ll keep it happy or hit a traditional rut by Year Three (assuming he gets there, and United should be very good next season).

Louis van Gone: Ex-Man United, Barca boss LvG retires from coaching

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It wasn’t supposed to end like this for Louis Van Gaal.

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In his mind, he probably imagine himself manager Manchester United for the duration of his three-year contract before riding off into the sunset after restoring the Red Devils as Premier League champions four months from now. At the very least, he’d agree to stay on one more season to complete a bit of unfinished business after narrowly missing out on the title in his third season in charge at Old Trafford.

Instead, he was fired last May, two days after lifting the FA Cup at Wembley Stadium, and has been out of a job ever since. Van Gaal’s unemployment will now continue for the rest of his days, as the 65-year-old announced on Monday that he has retired from coaching after 26 years at Ajax, Barcelona (twice), AZ Alkmaar, Netherlands (twice), Bayern Munich and Manchester United — quote from the BBC:

“I thought maybe I would stop, then I thought it would be a sabbatical, but now I do not think I will return to coaching.”

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After the stress put upon his shoulders while at Man United, the last eight months must have felt like heaven to Van Gaal. Why on earth would anyone ever go back?

Transfer rumor roundup: James Rodriguez to Chelsea, LVG to PSG

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There are few big names buzzing through the transfer rumor mill on Monday, one of whom is a manager.

As Dimitri Payet makes eyes at Arsenal — we dare you to call it differently — and Victor Lindelof is linked with Manchester United, who else is in the gossip grinder?

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New Club World Cup champion James Rodriguez is firing up the gossip mill on his own, as the Real Madrid man says he has “seven days to decide” if he’ll be staying at the Bernabeu.

Rodriguez says there are offers on the table for his services, which cost Real $84 million after the last World Cup. It’s hard to imagine his value has gone down much as, at 25, he’s still got plenty left in the tank. Chelsea is mentioned as a target.

From Sky Sports:

“I can’t assure I will stay at Real Madrid. I have offers and seven days left to think about my future. I am happy in Madrid, but I want to play more. I have a bitter feeling as I wanted to play the final, but I am happy for the title. It’s the 15th title in my career.”

Marca says two of three suitors for Eibar midfielder Dani Garcia hail from the Premier League. West Ham and Southampton are said to be interested in the 26-year-old central midfielder, a box-to-box player who captains Los Armeros.

And not quite a transfer, but how about this? Unai Emery left safe footing at Sevilla, where he was a three-time Europa League champion, to test his mettle at Paris Saint-Germain. Life isn’t off to a good start for Emery, and now rumors say Louis van Gaal could be next in line to manage the Parc des Princes’ set.

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Checking the success rate of national rehires as Arena takes U.S. reins

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Some nations have never done it, while others have made a habit; As Bruce Arena prepares for his second stint as United States men’s national team boss, what has history shown us regarding these repeat performances?

While each case is quite unique given both the nature of player turnover at the national team level and the relative burdens of a given program, perhaps there’s something to be learned from going back to the well.

[ MORE: Notable quotes from Arena, Gulati]

Two nations have done this in somewhat religious fashion: Brazil and the Netherlands. While the former was simply hearkening back to the golden days, reintroducing three bosses who had won the World Cup, the Dutch operated in an unorthodox manner in repeating many times.

Mexico, Chile, Argentina, Italy, and Belgium have all gone back to the drawing board once in the last few decades, while some nations: England, Spain, France, Germany.

I’ll admit that I was nonplussed at the idea of Bruce Arena re-appointment. He’ll do fine, as it would take some serious failing to miss out on the World Cup. But I’m hoping this exercise will lead me in a different direction, one of excitement.


Let’s begin in CONCACAF, where Javier Aguirre earned two stints with Mexico. Aguirre led El Tri to the Copa America final in 2001 and oversaw a terrific escape from the 2002 World Cup group stage, where Mexico was drawn with Croatia, Italy, and Ecuador. Mexico then lost to the USMNT in the Round of 16 (Landon Donovan!!), and that was that for stint No. 1.

Club Atletico de Madrid v RCD Espanyol - La LigaHis return will sound super familiar to U.S. fans. Aguirre was brought back to Mexico in the wake of foreign manager Sven-Gorn Eriksson’s losing two of his first three Hex matches. Upon his hiring Aguirre vowed, “I add, gentlemen, that I want the player who comes, come with pride, to recover the identity that comes with our love for the shirt”.

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Aguirre led Mexico back into the World Cup, and won the 2009 Gold Cup. El Tri finished second in its World Cup group but again bowed out in the first knockout round (3-1 to Argentina).

Verdict: Hard to call this anything but a success.


Marcello Lippi won the 2006 World Cup with Italy, which is nice we guess. He left the gig of his own volition, only to return after Italy lost at the quarterfinal stage of EURO 2008. In South Africa, Italy gained two points from a poor group with New Zealand, Slovakia, and Paraguay, and Lippi quit.

Verdict: This one didn’t work.


Georges Leekens is seemingly a rare bird in our study, a coach who disappointed in his first run but got another shot. Belgium failed to advance from the 1998 World Cup’s group stage, the first time the Red Devils missed the knockout rounds since 1982. Leekens was brought back in 2009, and could not help Belgium to EURO 2010.

Verdict: If at first you don’t succeed… don’t do it again?


Nelson Acosta led Chile from 1996-2000, and advanced to the Round of 16. Chile drew all three group games before falling to finalists Brazil in the first knockout round game. He came back for 2005-2007, with Chile not in the 2006 World Cup and bowing out in the quarters of the 2007 Copa America. Oh, and he quit midway through that tenure.

Verdict: Not great.


Argentina‘s repeat customer was Alfio Basile, who won two Copa Americas and a Confederations Cup, though a promising 1994 World Cup run was scuppered by one of Diego Maradona’s failed drug tests. Basile was brought back after the 2006 World Cup, and quit after a Round 10 loss in CONMEBOL qualifying that saw La Albiceleste swept by Chile.

Verdict: Rough.


As for the repeat offenders, Brazil and the Netherlands.

Mario Zagallo, Carlos Alberto Parreira, and Luiz Felipe Scolari were all brought back to Brazil after lifting World Cups. It’s worth noting that Parreira had a brief stint in charge before his Cup winning stint as well.

Mario Zagallo (Photo by Shaun Botterill/Getty Images)

Zagallo had won two World Cups as a player, too, before leading Brazil to the 1970 World Cup final. He returned almost a quarter century later, and led the nation to the final. They lost to hosts France.

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Parreira won the 1994 World Cup in the United States, returning 8 years late for a four-year run. Brazil conceding one goal in three group stage games, then blasted Ghana 3-0 before again falling victim to France, 1-0, this time in the quarters.

Scolari won the 2002 World Cup, and came back for the 2014 edition in Brazil. We know how that ended, with semifinal embarrassment at the hands of Germany.

Although any World Cup that ends before the final will be viewed as a failure by some Brazil supporters, none of the above results were true embarrassments.

VerdictHard to judge because, well, it’s Brazil.


The Dutch have turned over the same leaf many times, and their bravery was rewarded several times.

Louis Van Gaal‘s first tenure with the national team was rough, as the Netherlands missed the World Cup for the first time since 1986. His return, however, was sensational; Holland ran to the 2014 World Cup semifinal, only falling to eventual runners-up Argentina.

The legendary Rinus Michels (David Cannon/Allsport)

The other returnees had varied success. Rinus Michels had five spells in charge. He first led the Netherlands to the 1974 World Cup final, where they lost to West Germany, and came back to lead the team to the EURO 1988 title. They beat West Germany in the semis, and Michels is an undoubted Dutch legend.

[ MORE: Short-termism from USA? ]

Guus Hiddink led Holland to the 1998 World Cup semifinals, only losing to Brazil in penalties. He came back in 2014 to succeed Van Gaal, and the Dutch saw misery. Holland finished fourth in their qualifying group and missed EURO 2016.

Dick Advocaat navigated a tumultuous spell of Dutch football to lead the nation to the 1994 World Cup quarterfinals, where they fell to eventual champions Brazil. In his return, Advocaat led the Netherlands to the EURO 2004 semis and a surprising loss to Portugal. This was not viewed kindly.

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