Sam Allardyce

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Allardyce resigns, opening up intriguing vacancy at Palace

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Sam Allardyce is walking away on top outside the relegation zone.

The veteran Premier League manager, 62, resigned his post as Crystal Palace on Tuesday, weeks after leading another team to safety.

The move ends a tumultuous eight months for Allardyce, who was fired as England manager after an undercover sting exposed unethical dealings with agents.

[ MORE: Full 2016-17 season reviews

It also comes about an hour after somebody wrote that Crystal Palace should move on from Allardyce. What a jerk, that somebody.

Rarely at a loss for words, here’s Big Sam from cpfc.co.uk:

I want to be able to savour life while I’m still relatively young and when I’m still relatively healthy enough to do all the things I want to do, like travel, spend more time with my family and grandchildren without the huge pressure that comes with being a football manager.

This is the right time for me. I have no ambitions to take another job, I simply want to be able to enjoy all the things you cannot really enjoy with the 24/7 demands of managing any football club, let alone one in the Premier League.”

All kidding aside — and I’m far from a Big Sam fan — congrats to the man on walking away to enjoy the finer things in life. He had a heck of a run, and we’ll see how long he can resist being away from the fray. Cheers, Sam.

Palace and West Brom: Knowing when to cut ties

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This one’s for two chairmen, Steve Parish of Crystal Palace and John Williams of West Bromwich Albion, if anyone’s passing along advice from a writer with exactly zero Premier League experience.

There’s a temptation to leave well enough alone with managers, an allure made only more seductive by the fact that coaching stability is almost contrarian in the high-turnover world of the Premier League.

And if you’re goal is to just survive every year, then by all means, read no further. You have your men in Tony Pulis and Sam Allardyce.

Before we go any further, let’s admit to some prejudices. Pulis’ management preference to often bunker down and strip attacking talents of freedom, at least on the surface, is far from alluring and doesn’t quite fit the expectations of West Brom. And Allardyce is Allardyce, a blustery, credit-claiming boss who’s prime claim  is “I keep ’em up.”

But even beyond that, there’s a question whether either can change aims with so many years of the same anthems.

Pulis’ stingy teams have done relatively well, no doubt, and in no way is he a bad hire for a team with a vacant manager’s chair. But what happened for a second-straight season at the Hawthorns should be unacceptable, especially considering that this season saw a ship chartered toward high success.

When the Baggies clinched safety in 2015-16 only to fall flatter than Saido Berahino‘s West Brom career, it was forgivable. The Baggies hit the 39-point mark with a memorable win over Manchester United, then managed just four points over their last nine matches. That included home losses to Norwich City and Watford.

But critics — myself included — were eating their words when Pulis had West Brom dancing in the Top Ten deep into the 2016-17 season. These weren’t 1-0 counterattacking snoozefests, either, as Pulis was producing goals. Yet what happened when the Baggies hit their vaunted 40-point mark, this time on Feb. 25? One more win the rest of the way, to go with nine losses and two draws.

Here’s what Pulis said after a couple losses, “Complacency is the most annoying word in the dictionary. It is human nature to switch off a bit sometime.”

Sure, but how can it surprise when your mantra from August on is seemingly, “Get 40 points.” Staying switched on when you’ve targeted 40 like it’s the Champions League group stage is tough.

Still, that’s nothing compared to Allardyce, and Parish would be wise to leap at Big Sam’s latest big threats of quitting Palace. Forget that he was hired anywhere after his embarrassing ouster from the England job for a second, and focus on this:

Allardyce took over from Alan Pardew, and Palace slipped into the drop zone. Palace had done a woeful job of recruitment in the summer and Pardew overly complicated his problems by refusing to consistently plug service machines Andros Townsend and Wilfried Zaha into the mix with Christian Benteke.

Allardyce did fix that, but if he deserves anything it’s for striking it rich on three terrific transfer buys in Luka Milivojevic, Mamadou Sakho, and Patrick Van Aanholt. Spending in January is as important as it’s ever been, and Allardyce had more tools in his shed than Pardew or even Pulis beforehand.

Which is to say that if Palace likes Allardyce, fine, but to credit him for this turnaround is only partially worthwhile. To expect him to suddenly become or surprass the man who thrived at Bolton between 1999-2007 is foolish. Almost all of his career nods that don’t involve “avoided relegation” come at levels outside the Premier League, and Palace wants to keep growing.

Back to Pulis, he’s again highlighting the need for West Brom to spend, and perhaps that would allow him to adjust his mentality in the run-up to next season (You’d like to think he’d at least target a Cup run).

What’s worth saying is not that Palace and West Brom should fire their bosses. In Pulis’ case, let’s see if spending can change his stripes a bit (although it should be noted they’ve purchased Nacer Chadli, Matty Phillips, and Salomon Rondon). In Allardyce’s case, it’s a matter of employing a man who’s only out for his reputation and is either going to succeed and claim it was all his genius, or fail and put it on the players or board.

Aren’t there better options?

Report: Sam Allardyce wants to quit Crystal Palace

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The Daily Mail is reporting that Sam Allardyce wants to quit as Crystal Palace manager.

[ MORE: Full 2016-17 PL season reviews

Allardyce, 62, kept Palace in the Premier League on May 14 after beating Hull City, but it is reported that after a meeting with Eagles chairman Steve Parish, the former Bolton, Newcastle, West Ham and Sunderland manager has decided to walk away.

The core reason is thought to be that Allardyce is not impressed with the transfer plans the club has over the summer.

It is believed Palace want to meet again with Allardyce before confirming his departure  but the report states he has cleared out his office at the training ground.

The former England manager (he quit as Three Lions boss last September after being embroiled in an undercover newspaper sting) only joined Palace on Dec. 23, 2016 when he signed a two-and-a-half-year deal.

After struggling to turn things around initially, key January signings such as Mamadou Sakho and Luka Milivojevic helped the Eagles eventually soar away from the relegation zone as they beat Chelsea, Arsenal and Liverpool in the final weeks of the season.

Is it strange that Allardyce would move on? Tony Pulis left Palace in similar fashion back in 2014 after not getting assurances for Parish and the board over transfer spending for the next summer.

With the likes of Christian Benteke and Yohan Cabaye around, the Eagles have players on big money and have spent big to try and push into the PL’s top 10. However, they looked far from a top 10 team last season as Allardyce helped them stumble to safety with brilliant displays against the top clubs interspersed with poor showings against fellow strugglers.

If Big Sam doesn’t think the correct budget is there for him to work with, then you can certainly understand why he would walk away.

Allardyce: Palace sealing PL status “a massive relief”

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Sam “Never Been Relegated” Allardyce will retain his title for one more season.

This time around he’s helmed a safety run for Crystal Palace, who buried Hull City with a 4-0 win at Selhurst Park on Sunday.

[ RECAP: Palace 4-0 Hull ]

The former Blackburn, Sunderland, and West Ham boss saw his team dip into the drop zone early in his tenure, but spearheaded a magnificent run of form that culminated with Sunday’s safety-sealing win.

Here are his thoughts:

“It’s a massive relief. That’s for sure. We all know the implications of relegation today and the devastation it causes to a football club. This football club has been in the Premier League for five or six years and wants to grow.

“Tactically we set up to nullify Hull City and really just expose them where we thought they are weak. They held a high line so we put a quality ball behind and obviously that’s a great start.”

That quality ball was a back pass from Michael Dawson of which Andrea Ranocchia made quite a mess, but we shouldn’t begrudge Allardyce his moment in the sun.

He’s done it again, and also lauded his staff and everyone who works at the club for helping in the safety run. Class move from Big Sam.

Premier League Preview: Manchester City vs. Crystal Palace

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  • City beat Palace in PL, FA Cup
  • Palace has lost five-straight to City
  • City leads all-time 29W-12D-15L

Manchester City can improve its already steady grip on a Top Four place when it welcomes Sam Allardyce‘s resurgent Crystal Palace to kick off the Premier League weekend on Saturday (Watch live at 7:30 a.m. ET Friday on NBCSN and online via NBCSports.com).

The visitors are still not safe thanks to improved results from both Hull and Swansea. Sam Allardyce is publicly both anxious and confident, but a win will do the trick to allay all reasonable fears. Swansea losing would help just as much

 Standings GP W D L GF GA GD HOME AWAY POINTS
 Crystal Palace 35 11 5 19 46 56 -10 5-2-11 6-3-8 38
 Hull City 35 9 7 19 36 67 -31 8-4-5 1-3-14 34

 Swansea City 35 9 5 21 40 69 -29 6-3-8 3-2-13 32

What they’re saying

Pep Guardiola on Palace“Palace have huge quality in their strikers. When they arrive, Benteke is one of the strongest players in the box in the world. Sam Allardyce is a top coach and what they do is perfect. He took over a team in a bad situation and they make good results.”

Palace’s Sam Allardyce on being wiser than Guardiola“In this league, everything happens in the boxes. In other leagues, the people in the middle take care of the process. Here, nothing happens in the middle. It doesn’t seem the ideal place for Guardiola’s brand of passing football. Yet, he says he knew all about it before he came. It’s no surprise because I was a fan of the Premier League as a teenager, as an adult, as a player and as a manager.”

Prediction

Wilfried Zaha might make his mark, but not without several made in the other direction. Palace will remain unsteady in the PL with a 4-1 loss.