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Miazga: “We’re all ready to make an impression” with USMNT

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Last October, for reasons unknown, Matt Miazga didn’t make the U.S. Men’s National Team squad for its final two World Cup qualifiers.

Five months later, he’s risen to the top of the centerback depth chart.

[MORE: Digging into the USMNT roster]

The hulking centerback spoke on Tuesday as the USMNT started off its training camp in Cary, N.C., noting that the youth-laden squad wanted to make an impression to stay in the picture moving forward. With four years until the next World Cup and still more than a year until competitive matches, there is still plenty of shuffling and expanding of the player pool to do before then.

Have a listen to Miazga and enjoy the sights and sounds of the USMNT training camp ahead of its friendly match against Paraguay.


Morocco to spend $16B on 2026 World Cup venues, infrastructure

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Morocco says it will need to spend almost $16 billion to prepare to host the 2026 World Cup, with every proposed stadium and training ground built from scratch or renovated.

With less than three months until the FIFA vote, the north African nation on Saturday presented details of its proposal to take on the joint bid from the United States, Canada and Mexico.

The North American bid plans to rely on existing infrastructure, including large NFL stadiums already hosting events.

When FIFA insiders score the bids, infrastructure – of which half relates to stadiums – will account for 70 percent of the panel’s mark. The remaining 30 percent is based on projected costs and revenues. A high-risk bid can be disqualified before the FIFA Congress votes on June 13.

Morocco says for $3 billion it can build nine stadiums, refurbish five others and build or renovate 130 training grounds.

That is part of the $12.6 billion in public investment that also requires hospital services being upgraded in 20 cities and transport networks improved for the first 48-team World Cup.

The bid says another $3.2 billion of private investment is required to build hotels.

Morocco’s bid team told The Associated Press that the projections had been “carefully costed” but could not provide a breakdown on how the figures were reached.

Reports: Chicago, Vancouver pull out of World Cup 2026 bid

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Two major North American cities with World Cup-ready stadiums have pulled out of being host cities in the 2026 World Cup bid.

According to two separate reports, both Chicago and Vancouver will not be hosting any World Cup matches should the joint-bid between the U.S., Canada and Mexico win the right to hold the 2026 World Cup in North America.

In both cases, city and state leaders argued that FIFA asked for major financial guarantees without promising a huge return on investment, making the elected officials nervous about moving forward with a bid.

[READ: Chivas too much for Seattle]

“FIFA could not provide a basic level of certainty on some major unknowns that put our city and taxpayers at risk,” Chicago mayor Rahm Emmanuel’s office said in a statement Wednesday. “The uncertainty for taxpayers, coupled with FIFA’s inflexibility and unwillingness to negotiate, were clear indications that further pursuit of the bid wasn’t in Chicago’s best interests.”

It’s a big loss for the bid to lose these cities, though. Vancouver, who’s BC Place seats 54,000, hosted group stage and knockout round games before hosting the final of the 2015 Women’s World Cup, which the U.S. won in thrilling fashion over Japan. And Chicago, which had previously pulled itself out for the U.S. World Cup bids in 2010 and 2018-2022, hosted the opening match of the 1994 World Cup at Soldier Field and was assumed from the start that the third-largest city in the U.S. by population would be a host city.

As of now, Montreal, Toronto and Edmonton have agreed to move forward with the United 2026 bid, which should be more than enough for the current 10 games Canada will host. Mexico has proposed games played at Estadio Azteca, as well as in Nuevo Leon and Guadalajara.

Meanwhile, the U.S. still has 21 other venues to pick from, including major NFL stadiums such as MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J., AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas and the under-construction Los Angeles Stadium in Hollywood Park. FIFA has required the opening-match stadium and final stadium to seat 80,000+, while venues must seat a minimum of 40,000, which would force stadium’s like Toronto’s BMO Field to expand further.

Blatter: North American bid ‘afraid’ to lose 2026 World Cup

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ZURICH (AP) The North American bid to host the 2026 World Cup now seems “afraid” of losing to Morocco, former FIFA president Sepp Blatter said Thursday.

A change in strategy this week gave the leaders of the American, Canadian and Mexican soccer federations equal status in a bid that has been heavily favored to win the hosting rights on June 13 in Moscow. The reshuffle reduced the role of previous bid chairman Sunil Gulati, the most senior American in FIFA who served on the soccer body’s executive committee under Blatter.

[READ: Tottenham crumble on cusp of glory]

“They give the impression that they are not any longer very sure that they will win, that’s my impression,” Blatter said. “But I don’t know why they are afraid.”

Last month, Blatter wrote on Twitter that Morocco was the “logical host” of the 2026 tournament. FIFA preferred single-nation World Cup hosts under Blatter’s leadership.

Still, Blatter declined to fully endorse Morocco’s ability to host a 48-team tournament alone. The 2026 edition will have the 16 extra teams wanted by Blatter successor Gianni Infantino, who supports multi-nation bids.

“I don’t know if the Moroccans are able to organize a World Cup of 48,” Blatter told invited reporters at a briefing in Zurich related to his own legal issues.

Both bids will formally submit plans next week. A FIFA-appointed panel will then evaluate the candidates and publicly score them for potential organizational and commercial risks.

Two days ahead of his 82nd birthday, Blatter said he was “a happy man.” He is still seeking to challenge a six-year ban from soccer for unethical conduct, a punishment that followed Swiss federal prosecutors opening criminal proceedings against him in September 2015. He has yet to be charged.

The Swiss official has long blamed an executive committee vote in December 2010 that picked Russia and Qatar as future World Cup hosts for sparking American and Swiss federal investigations of FIFA officials that ultimately forced him from office.

Though Blatter says he voted for the United States bid that lost to Qatar for the 2022 hosting rights, he said that doesn’t mean the country deserves to get the 2026 edition.

“I was in favor of the U.S. for 2022. To say now they must have 2026 …,” he said, pausing to add: “History will show if it’s right or wrong.”

Blatter acknowledged he once thought the 2026 contest was “a decision that was taken” in favor of North America.

Last May, the three co-hosts pushed FIFA to give them preferential status before Morocco joined the contest by an August deadline with little bid structure in place.

Blatter said the U.S. team’s failure to qualify for this year’s World Cup – which led to Gulati not seeking re-election as soccer federation president – complicated the leadership issue. The bid calls for the United States to host 60 of 80 games in 2026, with Canada and Mexico hosting 10 each.

“They have put all the three together in order to show that it is a combined organization. They should have taken the decision at that time (of the World Cup exit),” Blatter said. “The USA is big and the decisions are not always easy to understand.”

Report: U.S. 2026 World Cup bid no longer overwhelming favorite

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The United States, Mexico and Canada may very well host the 2026 World Cup. But it’s not as much of a lock as it was when the bid was first officially announced.

According to reporting by ESPN’s Sam Borden, a number of factors on and off the field has led to Morocco’s bid catching up to the U.S.-led bid for the 2026 World Cup, just a few months ahead of the vote on who will host the World Cup. The reporting states that some believe Morocco’s World Cup bid has the backing of all of Africa, South America and much of Asia, which would put it over the 104-vote threshold needed for a simple majority win.

[READ: Premier League Power Rankings]

Other sources in the reporting state that the U.S.-led bid with Canada and Mexico is still the favorite, but the margin of victory will be much lower come the World Cup vote in June. FIFA’s entire member body of 211 nations – not including the four bidding nations and suspended Guatemala – are expected to vote at the FIFA Congress from June 12-13 in Moscow, Russia.

The U.S. missing out on the 2018 World Cup may not have helped its case, but it’s really the work of the U.S. Justice Department as well as comments by U.S. President Donald Trump that have reportedly changed the perception of a shoe-in World Cup in the USA.

Many in South America’s CONMEBOL are reportedly upset about the FBI investigation and Justice Department court cases against the former corrupt bosses of South American soccer, turning the organization upside down, while others have reportedly not taken too kindly to Trump’s travel ban of mostly Arab nations as well as some of his comments about other countries in the Caribbean and Africa.

The report states the USA-Mexico-Canada World Cup bid is going out of its way to stress the unity between the three nations when politicking with FIFA member nation executives to try and earn their votes.

It would be shocking for the U.S. to lose the bid for the 2026 World Cup, especially as the World Cup is being expanded to 48 teams and the U.S. is one of the few nations that can easily support that, but per the latest geo-political events, the vote could be closer than we had ever imagined it. Hopefully, it doesn’t come down to the last vote to know who will host the 2026 World Cup.