Offshore drilling, England: at Manchester City 3, Queens Park Rangers 2

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Man of the Match: Giving this honor to the player who scores the winning goal is often a cop-out, but when it’s a title-winning goal that completes one of the most memorable comebacks in Premier League history, there’s a bit more justification. Besides, the work Sergio Agüero put in on the final goal went beyond the final strike. He made his way along the edge of defense until he retrieved the ball, moved around Taye Taiwo, and won City their first Premier League title.

Packaged for takeaway:

  • It’s hard to overstate the drama. Manchester City scored twice in second half stoppage time after a disastrous second half that saw them give up their 1-0 lead and carry the title to Manchester United’s doorstep.
  • It looked good early, with City breaking through before halftime against a QPR side that played 10 behind the ball from the opening kickoff.
  • That goal was a gift, though. Pablo Zabaleta blasted a shot from 12 yards, but it was right at Paddy Kenny, who let the ball get through his hands and, after going off the far post, into goal. Kenny otherwise had a great game, but his first goal allowed was one put over the bar almost every other time you see it.
  • On the same play, City lost Yaya Touré, an absence that seemed huge as City chased in the second half. Touré had seemingly pulled a right hamstring half-way through the first, but he persisted, contributing on the opening goal. As his team celebrated, Touré sat on the turf, to be immediately replaced by Nigel de Jong.
  • With QPR playing so conservatively in the first, there was little reason to think they’d make a game of it in the second. City, however, condescended to help, with a erroneous header by Joleon Lescott off a looping ball by Shaun Wright-Phillips putting Djibil Cissé alone on goal. Equalizing only three minutes into the half, QPR barely had to come out of their shell.
  • And that stance persisted even after Joey Barton played the fool once again. Responding to some mild jostling from Carlos Tévez after cutting off his run, Barton swung a right elbow at the City attacker, connecting just under the jaw. It wasn’t a hard elbow, so Tevez was fine, but it was an obvious red card. As he was leaving the field, Barton kneed Agüero from behind and otherwise tried to fight any City player who confronted him (including Mario Balotelli, who tried to come off the bench to escalate affairs).
  • Twelve minutes later, Jamie Mackie put QPR on top, an unbelievable turn of events. Barton’s sending off almost seemed an appropriate end to an unimpressive Rangers’ campaign, but with 24 minutes left in their season, they were about to survive, hand City their first home loss of the season, snatch the title from City and hand it to Manchester United.
  • And until the end of the 90 minutes, QPR looked like they would hold out. City had their chances, but they were always through narrow channels easily blocked by Kenny. As stoppage time came, you’d convinced yourself that Manchester United would again, almost unimaginably, be champions. How could this possibly be happening? City, when all they had to do was beat QPR – a 10-man QPR – gives away the title?
  • After Edin Dzeko put home David Silva’s corner early in added time, you wanted the comeback to come true. Though they stumbled their way into an embarrassing spot (and brought tears to their fans’ eyes while doing so), a two-goal comeback in stoppage time is irresistable.
  • And ultimately, the title could not resist City. Their Sunday comeback completes a rebound that started weeks ago, when the Citizens were eight points back of a Manchester United side that need only close out a 4-2 home lead against Everton to start planning their victory celebrations. Instead, Manchester City claims their first Premier League title – the first time they’ve stood atop the first division since 1966.
  • Just as Manchester United’s comeback against Bayern Munich in 1999 will be remembered as a (possibly the) quintessential Champions League moment, City’s comeback to dethrone United may eventually be recalled as the title-clincher to shame all title-clinchers. It is extremely rare the the excitement of a knockout competition manifests in league, but for City, it was do-or-day come the 94th minute. And do, they did.

Mane undergoes hand surgery

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The “FIFA virus” is hitting Liverpool hard this month.

Sadio Mane, who reportedly broke his left thumb on international duty for Senegal, underwent surgery on Wednesday, Liverpool confirmed. The club did not include a timetable for Mane’s return in its press release, only saying, “Mane’s recovery will be monitored over the next couple of days ahead of the Reds’ return to action at Huddersfield Town on Saturday.”

With the injury, Mane joins Mo Salah, Naby Keita and Virgil Van Dijk as Reds to be injured during the international break.

As an attacker, it’s unlikely Mane really needs the use of his left hand other than to protect himself on aerial challenges on bumps from defenders, but depending on the recovery, it may just be a decision of how much pain Mane could tolerate. With matches against Huddersfield, Red Star Belgrade and Cardiff City to come, maybe this is a good time for Jurgen Klopp to rest some of his starters, including the walking wounded like Mane.

Fulham owner withdraws offer to purchase Wembley Stadium

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Wembley Stadium is set to stay in the FA’s hands.

[READ: USMNT 1-1 Peru: Player Ratings]

The FA announced in a press release Wednesday that Fulham owner Shahid Kahn had withdrawn his offer of $790 million to purchase Wembley Stadium. Kahn first became interested in buying the stadium in February 2017, when he and FA CEO Martin Glenn met at the Superbowl. What followed was an informal offer to the FA Board of Directors before a formal offer was made.

The offer has been valued at anywhere from nearly $800 million to nearly $1.2 billion. In a statement, Kahn said that his goal to purchase the stadium was to provide the FA with a large amount of capital which it could use to improve grassroots soccer around the country.

“The intent of my efforts was, and is, to do right by everyone in a manner that strengthens the English game and brings people together, not divides them,” Khan said. “Unfortunately, given where we are today, I’ve concluded that the outcome of a vote next week would be far from sufficient in expressing the broad support favored by the FA chairman to sell Wembley Stadium.”

The FA council was set to vote on the sale next week.

Although it cost the FA and British government more than $1.4 billion (adjusted for inflation) to renovate and rebuild Wembley Stadium, the arena hosted 33 events between July 2016 and June 2017 and in its latest published financial records, the FA recorded an after-tax profit of $21 million. So it seems that along with the sponsorships and broadcast deals, Wembley Stadium is a money maker, which makes it important for the FA to hold on to.

That being said, it’s hard to turn down a deal worth close to $1 billion, even if that’s a lump sum and they won’t receive further investments from stadium revenues in the future. In the future, maybe Kahn or another owner may make another offer, one that the FA council could accept.

Report: La Liga chief going to court to compel U.S. based games to happen

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The head of La Liga is considering taking extraordinary action to ensure that a planned match this year in the U.S. goes off as expected.

[READ: What did we learn about the USMNT?]

According to Spanish radio station Cadena Cope, La Liga president Javier Tebas is set to bring a lawsuit against the Spanish Football Federation (RFEF) and its chief, Luis Rubiales to compel the federation to approve Barcelona’s match against Girona on January 26, which has been scheduled to be moved to Miami, Fla.’s Hard Rock Stadium.

In a way, it makes sense that Tebas and the Spanish league is considering every possible avenue to ensure that their 15-year marketing rights agreement with Relevant Sports, including league matches played abroad, can move forward as expected. However, it was clear after the announcement in August that all parties involved – especially La Liga, had not thought this through. FIFA, the RFEF, local fans and the Spanish league’s player’s union have all opposed the news, and on Wednesday Real Madrid formally sent a letter of it’s disapproval in moving La Liga matches abroad.

Tebas and La Liga would prefer for this to be resolved legally sooner rather than later, so they can market the Barcelona match in Miami and begin negotiating with the other federations that need to approve. But there’s a decent chance that the other parties – FIFA, and U.S. Soccer – could fail to rubber stamp what would be a first-of-its-kind event. In any case, watch this space.

What did we learn about USMNT during international break

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The U.S. Men’s National Team finished the October FIFA international slate with a somewhat demoralizing loss and an uplifting draw, if there is such a thing.

The young U.S. core continues to show flashes of great talent, but overall the team still seems to be stuttering along under caretaker manager Dave Sarachan, who just managed his 10th game and could likely finish out the calendar year as USMNT boss.

[ MORE: Premier League stats ]

Below is a look at the key takeaways from the USMNT’s October friendlies:


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