Breakfast with United States coach Jurgen Klinsmann: Today’s topic – Landon Donovan’s career crisis

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I was among a small group of journalists who had breakfast late last week with Jurgen Klinsmann, the U.S. national team coach whose methods and player selection tendencies can sometimes lean to the less conventional. The results so far have been mostly favorable, even if the aesthetic hasn’t always risen to expectation.

Over the next week or so, we will extract one element each day of the extremely informative conversation, where Klinsmann expanded candidly on subjects ranging from Jozy Altidore to evolving player roles to Jermaine Jones to future matches and all points in between.

Today’s topic: Landon Donovan’s career crisis

At some point over the next few days – heck, perhaps even today for all we know – a quiet dinner somewhere in Southern California, away from prying media eyes, may have tons to say about the United States’ World Cup prospects for 2014.

U.S. manager Jurgen Klinsmann – seemingly wearing multiple caps as coach, father figure and career counselor – will sit with U.S. soccer’s reluctant superstar Landon Donovan. They’ll share a meal and try to cover some ground as Donovan marches toward a critical career decision.

Donovan’s career crisis conundrum – whether to push forward, take a short break, take a longer sabbatical or walk away from it all at age 30 after a 13-year professional career – will have bunker buster-type impact on the Los Angeles Galaxy and the U.S. national team.

Hence, Klinsmann’s interest.

Only, the U.S. coach doesn’t seem a bit bothered by the prospect of losing access to the program’s all-time leading scorer.

Said Klinsmann: “I take the easy approach that, that once your season is done, let’s sit down over lunch or dinner and just talk about your life, and what you want to do. … And I give you my two cents!”

He said that last part with a laugh. But who could doubt that Klinsmann is uniquely positioned to parcel out some advice? These two aren’t exactly alike – but they are similar in playing by their own rules in assembling a professional soccer career.

Klinsmann did it by seeking out life opportunities, exploiting chances to explore cultures through soccer in Italy, France and England. (Later in the United States, too.)

Donovan has cobbled together a fine pro career by eschewing the chance to travel, the necessary path for most American players destined to pin down the best version of themselves.

Klinsmann always wanted more out of life than soccer; Donovan seems to be leaning into that kind of mindset. So …

“We’ll see where he’s at,” Klinsmann said. “That’s what we are going to do now when he’s done [with the MLS Cup]. I am very positive that he continues to play. But as I have said previously, it’s his decision. … It’s totally up to him what he wants to do.”

All options are open, Klinsmann said. Presumably, that means Donovan could take a long period of R & R, miss the team’s early February qualifier and still be part of the longer planning.

“I don’t know. It’s really down to that talk we are going to have,” the coach said. “Maybe it takes more talks. I don’t know. But it’s no problem at all.”

Klinsmann is hardly oblivious to Donovan’s ability or potential impact. The Sporting News’ Brian Straus recently did a wonderful job outlining what Donovan faces as the face of U.S. soccer and what he means to the U.S. national team. By extension, of course, he means plenty to the team’s Brazil 2014 ambitions.

It’s just that Klinsmann focusses on a bigger picture, what he sees as an evolving “group that is growing, one with lots of fresh blood.”

“If Landon is not there – obviously we want Landon to be part of it – this team will find solutions. We will adjust. We will make the changes we need to make.”

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He mentioned Donovan’s lack of availability for some of those early Klinsmann-directed camps, which provided room for Brek Shea’s breakthrough. And in Russia last month, there was Josh Gatt (pictured) running the wing to somewhat promising effect; would we have seen Gatt if Donovan had been available?

Still, doesn’t Donovan’s availability affect the way Klinsmann wants the United States to play? For instance, Donovan’s speed and experience up-armors the team’s ability to counter attack. Even there, Klinsmann shrugs.

The guiding concepts aren’t married to any personnel, he said. Klinsmann talks about the “outline,” high pressure when they can, playing out of the back when they can (minus the long-balls as much as possible). Then he tweaks and twists from there.

“But still with the same approach, we want to push it up, we don’t want to just play defensively against Italy, or in Russia.”

Which all may be true. It’s just a lot easier to do with the speedy and heady feet of a guy like Donovan around.

(MORE of the Klinsmann conversation: explaining Jermaine Jones)

TOMORROW: Getting players to get more from themselves 

Ronaldo scores 700th goal for club and country

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Cristiano Ronaldo achieved yet another personal milestone in his star-studded career on Monday evening with a simple penalty kick goal.

With his 72nd minute strike, Ronaldo tallied his 700th goal for club and country in his career. It’s an incredible achievement, and one indicative of his incredible goal-scoring exploits and his long career.

Ronaldo was already leading all active players globally in terms of goals scored, so his 700th is only adding to the list. His former club nemesis, Lionel Messi, still sits a reported 28 goals behind him, according to Soccerway. After them, LA Galaxy striker Zlatan Ibrahimovic is the closest, and he has “only” 542 goals.

The Portuguese icon becomes the sixth male player to score 700 goals in his career. The others include Pele, Romaro, Josef Bican, Ferenc Puskás, and Gerd Muller.

Ronaldo made his debut for Sporting Lisbon in the 2002-2003 season as a 17-year-old and quickly was snapped up by Man United and Sir Alex Ferguson, where he transitioned from a tricky winger to a clinical striker who couldn’t stop scoring.

The 34-year-old has scored 40-or-more goals on three occasions in his career and he scored 25-or-more goals in all nine years he was at Real Madrid. For Portugal, he’s now scored an incredible 95 goals in all competitions. He had 15 goals in World Cup qualifying alone for the 2018 campaign.

Watch the video of Ronaldo’s breaking goal below. Unfortunately for him, Portugal fell, 2-1 to Ukraine.

Southgate, England players sound off on racist abuse

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England took care of business in Monday’s 6-0 thrashing of Bulgaria, but the Three Lions had to endure some horrendous racist abuse from the crowd during the game.

The match was paused on two occasions I’m the first half by the match officials after racist chanting could be heard from a section of supporters, and a large group of Bulgarian fans were ejected towards the end of the half. However, racist abuse continued during the match from small pockets of fans in the stadium.

[READ: England v. Bulgaria delayed after racist abuse from stands]

“I have to say that the officials were on to everything very quickly,” England manager Gareth Southgate told ITV after the match. “We reported everything immediately when we heard things, we had constant communication with the fourth official and the referee. I was in contact with the players, all the way through the first half in particular, and then again at halftime.

”We know it’s an unacceptable situation, and I think we’ve managed to make two statements. By winning the game, but also we’re raised the awareness of everybody to the situation. The game was stopped twice, I know for some people that won’t be enough, but we as a group were on board with that process.”

Raheem Sterling, who scored a brace in the win, also sounded off on social media, as did former England and Arsenal star Ian Wright.

Ultimately, UEFA and the match officials followed the protocol, but the sad part about this is that England and the officials had a plan for racist abuse, and it was predictable that it would happen.

In a statement after the game, the FA confirmed they would be asking UEFA to investigate what happened. However, any punishment is too little, too late for the players who endured the abuse.

Kane, Sterling star as England rout Bulgaria

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On a night where racist abuse from the stands in Bulgaria marred the overall spectacle, England’s players produced an incredible result and spectacle for the visiting fans, with all things considered.

Harry Kane scored once and assisted on three others as England rolled over Bulgaria, winning 6-0 on Monday evening in the Vasil Levski Stadium in Sofia, Bulgaria. Raheem Sterling and Ross Barkley both scored a brace for the Three Lions and Marcus Rashford’s thunderbolt from a tight angle gave England the opening goal it needed.

[READ: USMNT looks to build from win v. Canada]

The blowout result was the perfect response after England had suffered its first loss in qualifying for a decade, losing on Friday, 2-1 at the Czech Republic. The six goals England put past Bulgaria was also the fourth time out of six games that England had scored at least five goals in a match. The only other time, aside from the defeat, was a 4-0 win last month at Wembley Stadium over Bulgaria.

It took just seven minutes for England to get on the board. Barkley found Rashford down the left wing, and after turning a defender with a cross-fake, Rashford cut back from goal and whipped a strike that flashed past Bulgarian goalkeeper Plaman Iliev and in for a goal.

Kane, who has earned some criticism for not scoring as much recently as in the past, showed he was more than a goal-scoring No. 9. Combining with Raheem Sterling like he did so well at the 2018 World Cup, Kane in the 20th minute played a great pass into Sterling’s feet in the box. The Manchester City winger did the rest, crossing to a wide-open Barkley at the back post for a tap-in.

Kane again played provider in the 32nd minute, floating to the right and delivering an-inch perfect cross right to the penalty spot with his left foot. Barkley was there to meet it with a glancing header to score and put the game to rest.

Despite dealing with horrendous racist abuse from the crowd and two pauses in the game, England continued to attack and were rewarded when Kane set up Sterling for another tap-in moments before the halftime break.

Kane and Sterling connected again for another goal before in the 85th minute, Kane finally got his finish to send Bulgaria packing.

Considering the events in the stadium, it’s a triumphant win for England. However, they still must win at least one more game before automatic qualification to Euro 2020 is assured, as Kosovo beat Montenegro, 2-0 on Monday as well to stay within touching distance of England and the Czech Republic.

Racist abuse delays England v. Bulgaria qualifier

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England raced out to an impressive 4-0 lead at Bulgaria by halftime, but the wonderful attacking display was marred by horrendous incidents from the crowd.

The match in the Vasil Levski Stadium in Sofia, Bulgaria was stopped on two occasions with announcements being made to ask sections of the crowd to stop their abusive language. This comes with the stadium already serving a partial stadium closure due to racist chanting from the crowd in previous qualifiers.

Below is UEFA’s protocol on how to intervene in these situations, and what transpired from lead writer Joe Prince-Wright.