Want Chris Wondolowski on the World Cup roster? Great! Now … who do you leave out?

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You know that thing that hollerin’ pundits do around NCAA Tournament selection time, where they get high and mighty and talk about how this team got hosed, and how that one got hosed, too?

You know what most of them will not do? They generally won’t acknowledge that it’s a zero-sum game, meaning that for every winner there must be a loser. They skillfully dodge identifying which team they would boot from the field in order to squeeze in the unjustly uninvited.

See, it’s easy to be the good cop who invites everyone past the velvet rope – much harder to be the meanie that keeps some of the would-be partiers out.

(MORE: Tapping the brakes on the “Chris Wondolowski has Brazil booked” talk)

So we arrive here on the Chris Wondolowski conversation.  Because if Major League Soccer’s current Golden Boot holder gobbles up one of the spots, are we compelled to begin wading into the less pleasant end of this swimming hole: which player gets left behind?

History has shown that U.S. managers prefer to bring four forwards to World Cups. For Germany 2006 and South Africa 2010, Landon Donovan and Clint Dempsey were both listed as midfielders.

Here is where the math gets a little fuzzy, because manager Jurgen Klinsmann has used Dempsey almost exclusively as a second striker. The manager may see Dempsey as a forward – even if only nominally so, because all this stuff is more art than hard math, isn’t it? – and that would mean one fewer prototype frontrunner will be seated on that golden charter into Brazil.

Further, Donovan is filling a role as a second striker more often. Clearly, he’s capable of playing in wider positions, too. And there is a spot that appears to be open on the left at the moment. Still, the number of available forwards starts getting crowded quickly, doesn’t it?

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At this point, Jozy Altidore and Herculez Gomez are as close to “locks” as anyone can be 10 months out of official roster submission into FIFA. Clearly, injuries can happen. And players can fall out of form, although these two have done a lot to earn benefit of the doubt. Both would have to fall wildly out of form to be cast aside.

Eddie Johnson has probably done enough at this point, especially as Klinsmann has been bold about using the striker in wide positions. If Dempsey and/or Donovan go as a striker, there’s your list. And … please pardon me for doing this … Where’s Wondo?

Even if a fourth, natural forward is taken, and if that fellow is named Wondolowski, look who we’ve just eliminated: Probably Terrence Boyd, a really terrific young talent. Perhaps also Joe Corona, who was usually in the “hole” behind an advanced striker before the Gold Cup.

What about Jack McInerney, who may have something to say about all this in the next 10 months?

So, all this is not just about Wondolowski. There’s a bigger picture to consider – and to argue and debate about.

(MORE: U.S. striker depth chart heading into the  Gold Cup) 

Premier League clubs vote VAR into use for 2019-20 season

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It’s been inevitable for quite some time, but now it’s official: video review will be used in the Premier League when the 2019-20 season kicks off next August.

[ MORE: Fulham hire Claudio Ranieri after firing Slavisa Jokanovic ]

20 of 20 current PL clubs voted on Thursday to confirm the use of the modern technology beginning next season.

The Bundesliga and Serie A began using the video assistant referee (VAR) at the start of the 2017-18 season, and have continued (successful) operation of the system in 2018-19. Major League Soccer introduced the protocol two-thirds of the way through its 2017 season, to far greater degrees of varying success. La Liga is set to begin use of VAR next season as well.

[ MORE: England vs. USMNT preview ]

VAR was first used in the English game last season, when select FA Cup fixtures were used as test runs, while the same is being done in the EFL Cup this season.

Chelsea expected to let Cahill leave on loan in January

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Gary Cahill is no longer first-choice at Chelsea — anything but, in fact, as he’s played just 21 minutes in the Premier League this season — and the club is prepared to allow its captain to leave on loan in January as a reward for six years of excellent service, according to a report from the Guardian.

[ MORE: Fulham hire Claudio Ranieri after firing Slavisa Jokanovic ]

New Blues boss Maurizio Sarri has used Cahill sparingly thus far — even leaving him out of the 18-man team for Sunday’s draw with Everton — but has praised the 32-year-old for his professionalism and influence as a valued member inside the locker room. For those reasons, Sarri is prepared to do right by one of the club’s most senior members as Cahill seeks regular first-team minutes.

[ MORE: England vs. USMNT preview ]

Cahill’s current contract is set to expire in the summer of 2020, thus a loan in January and an ensuing permanent transfer this coming summer represents the club’s final opportunity to recoup a small fee for a player who will surely garner plenty of interest from within the PL. Having paid under $9 million to sign him from Bolton in January 2012, Chelsea have gotten pretty good value for their initial investment, including two Premier League titles, an FA Cup, a League Cup, and one Champions League and Europa League title each during Cahill’s spell at the club.

U.S. U-20 men one win from World Cup

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One win.

That’s all the United States’ U-20 men’s national team will need to advance to this summer’s World Cup in Poland and the Pan-American Games in Peru.

[ MORE: Surgery for Mendy ]

The Yanks cruised through group play with a nearly perfect nine days of soccer, the closest of five wins a 6-1 defeat of Trinidad and Tobago.

Competition is a bit tougher in the knockout stage, but Costa Rica and Honduras did the U.S. a massive solid by drawing 1-1 in their opener.

Now Tab Ramos’ kids can qualify for the World Cup with a defeat of Costa Rica on Friday or Honduras on Monday.

The top two teams in each group qualify for Poland, while the Group A winner advances to the CONCACAF U-20 Championship to face the winner of Group B (Mexico, El Salvador, or Panama).

The U.S. has spread the scoring around, lead by 17-year-old Ulysses Lainez of LA Galaxy II (six goals). His former Galaxy Academy buddy, Alexis Mendez of Freiburg has five goals, as does Toronto FC 18-year-old Ayo Akinola.

Atlanta United sits atop Forbes’ list of most valuable MLS franchises

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Atlanta United came up just short of the Supporters’ Shield, but it’s off-the-field success is No. 1 with a bullet.

Giving high marks to attendance and merchandise sales, Forbes places the Five Stripes atop its list of the most valuable franchises in Major League Soccer.

[ MORE: Surgery for Mendy ]

United sits first, with a valuation of $330 million. Both Atlanta and the second place Galaxy have valuations ahead of the two-least valuable teams combined (Columbus and Colorado). And the Five Stripes are worth twice the individual values of those teams and Vancouver. Full list here, from Forbes.com:

“Last season, average home-game attendance was 48,200, and this year the team is drawing over 50,000 fans per game. In just two seasons Atlanta has already laid claim to the league’s eight best-attended games ever, and nine of the top eleven.”

The margins are fine, relatively speaking, with Atlanta’s advantage over second place LA Galaxy by $10 million. Seattle is third at $310m, with newcomers LAFC at $305m, and Toronto FC at $290m.