An unsung hero from Columbus: Michael Parkhurst

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On days such as yesterday with much celebration, much fanfare, and much boasting, there often goes a moment, a performance, or an individual who gets overlooked.

Last night, Landon Donovan, Eddie Johnson, and the stars of the USMNT took much of the credit – and rightly so – for their second half domination of Mexico en route to Brazil 2014 qualification.

One individual’s performance did, however, get swept under the rug, and without it the game would have been vastly different.

Michael Parkhurst came on as a second-half substitute for right-back Fabian Johnson, and changed the match entirely in the home side’s favor.

It was clear that, with a new coach at the helm for all of three days, Mexico was keeping things simple. They fired salvos directly at the obvious vulnerabilities of the United States – they challenged hard in the weakened US midfield, and bombarded their right flank just as the Costa Ricans had done. They looked to start with a bang – again, like Costa Rica – and grab a goal or two before tiring.

Getting the start at right-back was Johnson, and although he fared much better than poor Michael Orozco, it was still a point of weakness. Right-back has been a merry-go-round for the United States in the recent going, and Jurgen Klinsmann has worked hard to find a suitable fit down the flank who can provide both an attacking instinct as well as a brick wall for opposing wingers.

Mexico had tired from their early frenzy, and had no goals to show for it. Enter Parkhurst, who came on for Johnson at halftime who had apparently tweaked his hamstring. He was the switch the United States was looking to flip.

Often as a defender, it is best to go unnoticed. Much like a defensive back in football, it is more difficult to notice when one performs well, but all too easy to spot mistakes – which often lead to scores. Parkhurst is easily overlooked, largely because the Mexicans had ended their pounding of the US right flank by halftime.

However, what cannot be underestimated is how well the 29-year-old Rhode Island native fit into the well-organized US back four. The crew, both first half and second, seemed to absorb a fair bit of pressure but never looked like they were on the verge of conceding, and the organization between the back line and the defensive midfielders on Mexican attacks is without question a main reason why.

On the attacking end, Parkhurst added a lovely first-touch layoff to Mix Diskerud on the United States’ second goal, which Diskerud worked to the edge of the box and crossed to Donovan to punch home. Again, in the background, but contributing nonetheless.

Is Parkhurst the long-term solution at right-back? It’s a question whose answer has eluded not just Jurgen Klinsmann but almost every fan as well. People have their opinions, but nobody seems to agree.

Fabian performed so-so, but appeared to be the weakest link of the back four in the first half nonetheless. Steve Cherundolo had knee surgery…again. The Michael Orozco experiment at Costa Rica was pretty much a failure. Eric Lichaj has been stuffed to the bottom of the pile by the current regime thanks to spotty performances at the club level. Brad Evans figured to be the man this qualifying round but ended up with niggling injuries – nothing new for the 28-year-old. Klinsmann seems to favor Geoff Cameron out of position at defensive midfielder rather than in the spot he plays for at Stoke.

Whomever you believe to be the long-term answer, credit must be given to the man who, for 45 minutes, took the weakest link in the United States back four and solidified it.

This allowed for bigger and better things to take place up front – namely, that whole “Dos a Cero” business we’ve been shoving down your throat.