Kyle Martino chats Andre Villas-Boas drama and Premier League parity

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EXCLUSIVE — Following his side’s 2-2 draw with Manchester United this past weekend, Andre Villas-Boas made headlines for lashing out at journalists who questioned his ability to manage Tottenham (see video).

Accusing the Daily Mail’s Neil Ashton and Martin Samuel of launching an attack on “my integrity, my human values, and my professionalism,” many felt Villas-Boas came off as overly-sensitive and even petty.

He had just finished a high-intensity 2-2 match with Manchester United, a game that may not have seen his side take the three points but one that did, however, go a long way to erasing the previous week’s 6-0 nightmare loss to Manchester City.

Fast forward three days and Villas-Boas’ squad finally did get that much-needed victory, although the 2-1 win at Fulham was hardly a convincing act. Down 0-1 after Ashkan Dejagah’s 56th minute strike, Spurs needed goals from Vlad Chiriches and Lewis Holtby to spare AVB’s blushes.

Unconvinced that the Portuguese boss is off-the-hook at White Hart Lane, I sat down with NBC Premier League analyst, Kyle Martino, and talked all things AVB and Spurs.

When asked whether AVB’s job was under threat, Martino issued a decisive “No,” adding the caveat, “but the period of scrutiny has definitely started and you can bet the powers-that-be are now monitoring the situation very close. The reality for AVB is that he lost the best player in the Premier League last year, a player who probably overshadowed a few cracks in the system. But when you spend $150 million or so in the summer, alongside that comes incredible expectations of improvement. If they hadn’t lost Gareth Bale and didn’t spend a lot of money, you’d have more patience with his predicament.”

Hard to disagree with that. With increased resources comes increased expectations.

As far as AVB’s reaction at the press conference goes, Martino was sympathetic. “Look, I understand and appreciate his desire to want to defend himself when he feels he’s being personally attacked but something that comes with being an experienced manager is being calm and secure when playing the media game.”

“Right now the media are getting AVB to do exactly what they want him to do, which is react and get upset. I don’t think he’s wrong in a man-on-man personal situation but he needs to look at the bigger picture – when his team sees an interview like that I think they see a manager that’s slightly over-sensitive before they see a manager who’s standing up for himself.

“When you go back at your critic, you give them bait that validates their comments. Whereas if you dismiss them, that’s what makes you look the strongest.”

Martino’s argument of refrain and dismissal is spot on. A similar philosophy was echoed by Sir Alex Ferguson in his latest autobiography, “Ferguson.”

There, the United legend notes that the best piece of advice he ever received on the media front was from a friend named Paul Doherty, who told Fergie that he was “giving the game away” and “showing his worries” during press conferences.

Ferguson agreed. “Appearing beleaguered is no way to handle the press. Showing your torments to them is no way to help the team or improve you’re chances of winning on a Saturday.”

Ferguson goes on to claim that he “couldn’t allow a press conference to become a torture-chamber” and that it was his duty to protect the integrity of the club.”

For Ferguson, the key to press conferences was to prepare himself mentally while he noted that his “experience” was a huge factor in allowing him to “see the line a journalist is pursuing.”

It all lines up, doesn’t it?

The perfect descriptor for AVB last weekend was “beleaguered.” The press room truly was his “torture-chamber.” And during that bust-up, he definitely would’ve given his left arm for 1/4th the experience of Sir Alex Ferguson.

But that’s life.

AVB is simply not that experienced. He’s only 36-years-old. Those kind of moments are bound to happen.

When I asked how smart he thinks Villas-Boas is, Martino said: “I think he’s very smart, getting his badges as a young man, learning under Sir Bobby Robson and Jose Mourinho. If you’re an intelligent and ambitious person, which AVB is, you can’t help but absorb those things.”

With that high a level of intelligence, however, there is a sense that AVB tends to overcomplicate things. Martino makes an interesting observation: “If you watch AVB on the sideline it takes him three minutes of conversation to get across his points to a substitute. That’s the kind of technocratic overload that can paralyze some players. I’ve heard players talk about him planning training sessions weeks in advance. To be that meticulous can be too much.”

Another thing AVB seems to be taking seriously is the Europa League.

Martino chuckles, “Yeah, I’m not sure if going after the Europa League rather than the Premier League is the best thing to do after spending $150 million on players last summer. Spurs fans want improvement on last year’s Premier League season. They want a Champions League spot.”

That’s the thing in the Premier League – a lot of clubs want a Champions League spot. Right now, it appears the title will be decided by three teams: Arsenal (34p) Chelsea (30p) and Manchester City (28p).

But who will claim that precious 4th spot?

That’s the million dollar question.

And currently any of six different clubs (Liverpool (27), Everton (27), Tottenham (24), Newcastle (23), Southampton (22) and Manchester United (22)) could make it happen.

It’s a situation that has Martino shaking his head in disbelief.

The parity truly is astounding.

Zidane quizzed on Pogba: ‘We know what we want to do’

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Zinedine Zidane’s open flirtation with Paul Pogba continues, as the Real Madrid manager was asked about Manchester United’s star midfielder again on Saturday.

“We need to respect everybody, but the only thing I can say from the club is we know what we want to do,” Zidane said. “Something could happen before the end of August. We could have some changes.”

[ MORE: Wolves beat Man City in pens ]

On paper the purchase of Pogba makes sense to reloading Real, but the problem here is the sheer amount of paper the Madrid side has spent on players this season.

While sales of James Rodriguez, Dani Ceballos, and Gareth Bale could put Real in okay position regarding Financial Fair Play, buying Pogba would move the needle hard in the other direction considering the club has bought Ferland Mendy, Eden Hazard, Eder Militao, Luka Jovic, and Rodrygo.

Plus, Florentino Perez likes to buy only one Galactico per transfer session, and Hazard is undoubtedly this summer’s model.

That said, Real has assets that United could use in Ole Gunnar Solskjaer‘s overhaul of the Old Trafford set.

UEFA gives partial stadium bans to Bulgaria, Romania for fan racism

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NYON, Switzerland (AP) Bulgaria will have to close part of its national stadium for European Championship qualifiers against England and the Czech Republic because of fan racism.

UEFA issued the order, saying Bulgarian fans were racially abusive during a 2-1 loss to the Czech Republic and a 3-2 loss to Kosovo last month.

Bulgaria hosts England on Oct. 14 and the Czech Republic on Nov. 17.

Romania has also been ordered to close part of its home stadium for a future under-21 game after UEFA ruled its fans behaved in a racist manner during the European under-21 championship last month.

Another racism case against Latvia was dropped.

UEFA also handed out various fines to Romania, Ukraine, and Greece for rowdy behavior by fans.

Transfer rumor roundup: Everton join Zaha chase; Matuidi to Man Utd?

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A roundup of Saturday’s biggest transfer rumors from around the world, including those involving a few Premier League clubs…

[ MORE: PL refs told to defer to VAR more, go to the monitor “sparingly” ]

Wilfried Zaha is one of the most wanted men in England, with Arsenal reportedly hot on his trail all summer. An deal between the Gunners and Crystal Palace is yet  to transpire, though, which has perhaps left the door open for Everton to sneak through and sign the 26-year-old Ivory Coast international.

Arsenal would obviously pay more in wages, but are yet to meet Palace’s valuation of their talisman. If Everton is the club that calls with the requisite figures on offer, it wouldn’t be the worst landing place for Zaha. With Arsenal yet to make a meaningful signing this summer, and the likes of Aaron Ramsey and Laurent Koscielny already gone or on their way out, the 2019-20 season could see the Gunners take a step back, opening the door for — you guessed it — Everton to break into the top-five… or -four.


Speaking of Ramsey, his arrival at Juventus has perhaps made Blaise Matuidi surplus to requirements, which means he could be available for cut-rate price.

Manchester United seem to be perennially in need of influential central midfielders, especially this summer after the departure of Ander Herrera and the failure of a signing that was Fred last summer. Man United have reportedly been in contact with Juve about the 32-year-old, as have Paris Saint-Germain and Everton.


Sergej Milinkovic-Savic is another midfielder who’s been linked with United, but he’ll likely just as much as, if not more than, the $59-million fee paid for Fred. Milinkovic-Savic seemed a surefire target for the world’s top clubs after a star’s showing at last summer’s World Cup in Russia, but the 24-year-old remained at Lazio and is still yet to move 12 months later.


Patrick Cutrone was one of Europe’s breakout stars of the 2018-19 season, now the 21-year-old AC Milan forward is reportedly high atop Wolverhampton Wanderers’ shopping list this summer. He won’t come cheap — Milan are expected to demand nearly $30 million — but he could offer some serious insurance in the event of an injury to Raul Jimenez.

PL refs told to defer to VAR more, go to monitor ‘sparingly’

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Premier League interim chief executive Richard Masters says that referees have ben instructed “to use the referee review area a bit more sparingly” and rely on the numerous video-assistant referees (VAR) at their disposal to make simple calls upon review when video review is instituted in the PL next month.

[ MORE: Lukaku latest: Man United reject $67-million bid from Inter Milan ]

Following the 2019 Women’s World Cup, where far too many trip to the monitor were made by the center referees, the PL is keen on ensuring that “the Premier League or English football [is not] interrupted, or the pace of the game [is not] changed.” It sounds very much like a “less is more” approach  — quotes from the BBC:

“I think fans want to see those clear and obvious mistakes changed and put right. But they don’t want to see the Premier League or English football interrupted, or the pace of the game changed.

“I think the only difference you might see is the referees using the referee review area a bit more sparingly and relying more on the VAR for the more subjective decisions.

“But we are putting something new into the Premier League and if it needs to be refined or improved or tweaked we will look at it when the moment arises.”

In theory, this should work quite well for the PL. Many of the decisions that referees go to the monitor to review themselves could easily be made by the “fifth official.” If it’s obvious to the VAR and he/she can make the call with 100 percent certainty, the center ref should always take their decision in the name of keeping the game flowing. If the VAR isn’t so sure, or it’s a more subjective call that should be made by the person making 99 percent of the game’s calls, go to the monitor. But do so quickly.