Tax-free Monaco embraced after club’s $68 million payment keeps it in French soccer

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After conflict between Monaco and the rest of French soccer left the top tier’s seven-time champions on the brink of explosion from their league, the club and the Ligue de Football Professionel reached an agreement on Friday that will allow Ligue 1’s second place team to stay in the French league. Whereas AS Monaco were on the brink of being excluded from next season’s competition because of a new rule targeting their tax-exempt status, the club will now pay an expensive, one-time fee to maintain their place in le Championnat.

“Out of concern for the equality and balance of the competition, AS Monaco are committed to paying a voluntary, fixed and definitive sum of €50 million to the LFP,” the league said in a Friday statement, “and will withdraw their plea to the Council of State.”

Monaco, having spent lavishly since Russian businessman Dmitry Rybolovlev bought the club in Dec. 2011, pays $68.4 million to stay in the league, a status the club has enjoyed since 1933. With tax rates against high incomes climbing in France, the remainder of the French league had grown tired of Monaco’s competitive advantage, the club based in a tax-free principality that operates independent of French law. That advantage has helped lure like likes of Radamel Falcao, João Moutinho, and James Rodríguez to the club, with Rybolovlev’s team alleviated of paying the personal income tax that is customarily covered by French clubs.

source: AP
Dmitry Rybolovlev purchased AS Monaco in 2011 as the club embarked on their two-year stint in the second division. His spending has vaulted them back into Ligue 1 and into a UEFA Champions League spot. (Photo: AP.)

In response to Rybolovlev’s spending, the LFP had adopted a rule that, effective next season, would exclude all clubs whose offices were not located in France. Monaco was pursuing a resolution through the French courts before Friday’s resolution, one that Rybolovlev touted on the club’s website:

“From the beginning we wanted to find an intelligent solution which would work for both sides, within a favourable climate for negotiations.

The AS Monaco FC project can help raise the level of French football and it is good that this has been understood.”

The idea that teams like Monaco and Paris Saint-Germain can help raise Ligue 1’s level underscored the early acquiescence to PSG’s rise. Part of the theory was revenues PSG would raise (or, merely inject) money into the rest of the first division either through player purchases or by raising the league’s commercial profile.

Based in the French capital, PSG is subject to the same taxation as 18 other clubs in Ligue 1. Monaco, however, doesn’t have to endure the same tax on Falcao as PSG’s paying for Zlatan Ibrahimovic. Where it’s customary to have agents negotiate such that clubs are responsible for players’ income taxes, Monaco faces a significant edge when accounting for their high-end talents.

Thanks to Friday’s $68.4 million settlement, that edge gets preserved in perpetuity. From the club’s statement announcing the agreement:

By paying a single, lump-sum, voluntary contribution of EUR 50 million, payable in installments, AS Monaco FC is demonstrating its commitment to French football and will be able to continue to pursue its project for the benefit of all stakeholders.

The shared history between French football and one of its most faithful representatives has made it possible to find an agreement that will put an end to their legal dispute, with an undertaking from both sides that this agreement cannot be challenged later.

If the point of pursuing Monaco was restoring competitive advantage, it’s unclear this agreement makes sense. The $68.4 million fee Monaco’s paying represents only a few years’ taxes on their players. In the big picture, this isn’t something that’s going to inhibit Monaco from taking advantage of their slanted playing field.

In accepting this solution, the LFP’s agreeing with Rybolovlev, even if their statement touted the need for “equality and balance.” Having settled for such a small payment, the deal does little to achieve those ends. Though it may have symbolic value in getting Monaco to acknowledge their advantage, it won’t inhibit players from moving to the club. It won’t deter Rybolovlev from growing his team. It won’t stop Monaco from exploiting their advantage on the rest of their league.

But Ultimately, it does them no good to kick out Monaco. Perhaps France would have a more equitable competition, but they’d have it at the expense of their commercial growth, something that can’t be taken lightly for a circuit that continues to attract some of the world’s best talent. With clubs like PSG and Monaco in the league, Ligue 1‘s profile could eventually challenge that of the Serie A and Bundesliga. When that challenge translates into revenues, the rest of le Championnat‘s clubs may be better off.

At least, that the end game the LFP are hoping to see. Whether that transpires, only time will tell. After Friday’s agreement, however, the experiment is set to run its course. The LFP has signed off on Monaco’s competitive advantage, accepting a large if token payment in the process. Now Monaco has to make good on their promise.

Champions League Final to return to Istanbul

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Here’s a bit of news which will put smiles on Liverpool supporters’ faces ahead of the weekend’s big UEFA Champions League Final against Real Madrid.

The UEFA Champions League Final is headed back to Istanbul, the city known for boasting perhaps the most celebrated moment in Liverpool history.

[ MORE: Next USMNT-Mexico date set ]

Istanbul’s Ataturk Olympic Stadium will host the 2020 UCL Final, 15 years after the Reds rallied from a 3-0 halftime deficit to defeat AC Milan in penalty kicks.

The 2019 final will be held in Madrid’s Wanda Metropolitano Stadium, home of Atletico Madrid.

U.S. Open Cup fourth round draw: New York Derby, Minnesota-Cincinnati

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Major League Soccer enters the fray as the Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup reaches its fourth round.

There are four all-MLS matches in the bunch, including another round of the Hudson River Derby between NYCFC and the New York Red Bulls.

[ MORE: Next USMNT-Mexico date set ]

Elsewhere, Portland hosts San Jose, Chicago visits Columbus, and Real Salt Lake entertains Sporting KC.

Open qualifier NTX Rayados earn a date at Houston Dynamo, while PDL side FC Golden State Force will visit the LA Galaxy.

NPSL side Miami United hosts Orlando City as an MLS side travels to visit a fourth-tier side.

The rest of the match-ups feature USL sides vs. MLS teams.

[ REPORT: FC Cincinnati to join MLS in 2019 ]

The winner of the U.S. Open Cup gets a spot in the CONCACAF Champions League.

Full schedule (June 5-6)
New York Red Bulls vs. NYCFC
Louisville City (USL) vs. New England Revolution
DC United vs. North Carolina FC (USL)
Philadelphia Union vs. Richmond Kickers (USL)
Miami United (NPSL) vs. Orlando City SC
Atlanta United vs. Charleston Battery (USL)
Minnesota United vs. FC Cincinnati (USL)
Columbus Crew vs. Chicago Fire
Nashville SC (USL) vs. Colorado Rapids
Real Salt Lake vs. Sporting KC
Houston Dynamo vs. NTX Rayados (LQ)
San Antonio FC (USL) vs. FC Dallas
LA Galaxy vs. FC Golden State Force (PDL)
LAFC vs. Fresno FC (USL)
Portland Timbers vs. San Jose Earthquakes
Sacramento Republic (USL) vs. Seattle Sounders

Pulisic on USMNT dream; Premier League rumors

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Christian Pulisic hasn’t played for the U.S. men’s national team since last October but next Monday he will step out onto the pitch for the Stars and Stripes once again, and he will be less than a few hours away from his hometown of Hershey, Pa.

It will be quite the homecoming for Pulisic, still just 19 years old, as the Borussia Dortmund star plays for the USMNT in a friendly against Bolivia at Talen Energy Stadium, close to Philadelphia.

[ MORE: Latest USMNT news ]

In an exclusive chat with Pro Soccer Talk, Pulisic revealed that he is ready to be a leader, if that’s what is asked of him, as the USMNT continue rebuilding after their World Cup qualification nightmare eight months ago.

“We definitely have a younger roster this time around and I’m really looking forward to going in there and obviously I am young as well but I have a few caps to my name and I’m looking forward to being kind of a role model to these guys and helping shape our new team for the future. If it takes me being more of a leader out there that’s what I’ll have to do and I’m happy to be in that role,” Pulisic said.

Pulisic was speaking to PST about his new partnership with the Hershey Company and the playmaker was delighted to be linking up with his hometown brand as he received a Reese’s Outrageous Bar inspired cleats.

“I am super excited to be Stateside, always, so being able to spend a lot of time here recently has been awesome,” Pulisic said. “And I am super excited with everything with Hershey.”


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As he returns to the state of Pennsylvania to play for the USMNT, Pulisic also played for Dortmund at LAFC in midweek before he links up with the national team in Philly on Thursday. Dortmund will also take on Benfica in Pittsburgh this summer in the International Champions Cup, as ‘the kid’ will be spending plenty of time with family in the Keystone State as he recharges his batteries from a tough season in the Bundesliga.

With 42 games under his belt for Dortmund this season in Germany’s top-flight (they finished in the top four but struggled throughout), Pulisic isn’t concerned with playing too many games in just his second full season as a pro. And with four goals and five assists in the Bundesliga, he set a goal and assist record for himself in league play.

He believes the best is yet to come as he gets set to work under a new coach, Lucien Favre, at Dortmund.

“There were definitely a lot of ups and downs this season but I’ve learned so much this year and obviously I feel that I have improved in the last season and I still feel that I have a long way to go,” Pulisic said. “Looking back at the season, finding things I can improve on and I will continue to work on those and hopefully we can do even better personally and as a team next season.”

“I just want to work hard every day in training and earn my spot every weekend. That’s always been the goal for me. Obviously I want to continue to build. Personally I have so much to build on, to be more clinical and get stronger, even trying to get my numbers up higher next season. That’s what I’m going to try and do and I’m going to work very hard to achieve that. Every player wants to score goals and get assists. I think I can do much more than that on the field, which doesn’t show on the stats, but of course that’s a very important part of the game.”

As Pulisic’s star has risen, rumors regarding his future have intensified and he continues to be linked with moves to Premier League giants Liverpool and Manchester United.

Do the reports frustrate him? Or is it flattering to be linked with some of the biggest clubs on the planet consistently?

“I really don’t look or read into it very much,” Pulisic said. “People know more about it than I do! Of course, the Premier League is a great league. It was a dream to play there when I was younger but I’m under contract with Dortmund and I’m just working hard there at the moment.”

So often American soccer fans say Pulisic shouldn’t move now to the rough and tumble of the Premier League and should instead spend the next few years improving his game at Dortmund and in the UEFA Champions League. When asked, the teenager didn’t set a timeframe on when would be the best time for a potential move to the PL.

“I’m very focused on the here and the now. Of course, you never know what can happen with professional sports but I am just focused on what I am doing right now,” Pulisic said.


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Focusing on the past, Pulisic’s tears became the lasting image of the USMNT’s loss at Trinidad & Tobago back in October 2017 as he broke down on the field after the defeat which sealed their failure to qualify for the World Cup this summer.

USMNT fans won’t need reminding that the U.S. won’t be at the World Cup for the first time since 1986.

And Pulisic believes the USMNT not being at the big dance will have a big impact on the nation from a soccer perspective.

“When I was just a kid watching the U.S. at the World Cup, that gave me so much inspiration, seeing my country and seeing people playing with the U.S. crest,” Pulisic said. “Seeing them compete at a World Cup inspired me so much. Missing out on that is going to be a big thing but that doesn’t mean it’s over for U.S. Soccer. We are still growing a lot and we will do everything we can to be at the next one.”

As we edge towards the 2018 World Cup with excitement building across the globe, has time helped ease the pain for Pulisic?

“I’ve had a lot of time to think about it and it definitely hurt more right after the shock and that it had happened,” Pulisic said. “Now, leading into the World Cup, I am just going to watch the games, I have some time off now to rest, which my body could use. Watching the World Cup is going to get me even more excited and I’ll want to be in the next World Cup even more… I’m just looking forward to some good games, now that the U.S. isn’t there, I just want to see some good football.”

Pulisic admitted that he “hadn’t really looked into” the intense fallout from the USMNT’s failure as outgoing head coach Bruce Arena and several senior players had their say.

Wise beyond his years, Pulisic summed it up simply. But it’s clear that the pain still remains.

“I just think we had a great chance to qualify with one game and we had a little slip up there… a big slip up, actually, and that’s what happened,” Pulisic said. “I don’t look at the tiny little details as to what could’ve gone wrong. Because that would just drive me crazy.”


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With interim head coach Dave Sarachan in charge for three friendlies since the World Cup qualification debacle, plus the friendly against Bolivia and then outings at the Republic of Ireland and France next month, the USMNT are in a strange place.

They have no permanent head coach. No General Manager has been appointed in the newly-created role. And there’s a real lack of direction as U.S. Soccer seemingly waits for coaches to be out of work following the World Cup this summer so they can then plan for the future.

“Not being in the World Cup has put us in a whole different situation but we still have good coaches and new players that they’re bringing in and trying to develop, so I don’t think it’s a real problem at the moment. We are going to put our heads down and continue to work,” Pulisic said.

Those given the chance to work hard include plenty of youngsters, with the average age of the squad to face Bolivia just 22 years of age. With Sarachan expected to ring the changes and go with a more experienced lineup for the games against Ireland and France, now is a big chance for the youth to shine as the road to the 2022 World Cup has well and truly begun.

There’s no doubt that Pulisic will be the leader of a new era in American soccer and with the likes of Weston McKennie, Tyler Adams, Matt Miazga and Tim Weah building their professional careers successfully at big clubs home and abroad, the future is bright.

“The next step is just the Bolivia game and continuing to develop all of our players and getting them minutes,” Pulisic said. “Hopefully all of the young players, and I see a lot of American names in Europe, which is great, hopefully we will continue to develop and continue to make time for the national team and play some games together and create some chemistry and hopefully build a strong team going into the next World Cup.”

Still just a teenager, could it be a case of ‘Captain Pulisic’ blazing the trail towards the tournament in Qatar?

“I always dreamed of just playing for the U.S. men’s national team, not necessarily being the captain, but I’m happy to take on whatever leadership role it is, be it leading by example or whatever,” Pulisic said.

This is now his team. The kid from Hershey has the reins. And let’s be real, he’s had them for the past two years since he burst onto the scene.


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USMNT-Mexico to renew rivalry on Sept. 11

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The USMNT will renew its rivalry with Mexico for the first time since World Cup qualifying when El Tri pays a September 11 visit to Nashville.

Mexico will be coming off its World Cup run, while the U.S. summer consists of friendlies against Bolivia, Ireland, and France.

[ MORE: Pochettino signs new Spurs deal ]

The federation did not announce when tickets would go on sale, or how they would be allotted, saying that information will come at a later date.

The U.S. is winless in its last three matches against Mexico, with two losses to go with the 1-1 draw at Estadio Azteca in June 2017.

Theoretically, the Yanks will be facing the Mexico test with a new permanent coach. Dave Sarachan has been running the ship since Bruce Arena resigned after an embarrassing loss at Trinidad and Tobago which kept the U.S. from reaching the World Cup.

Mexico is in tricky World Cup Group F with Germany, South Korea, and Sweden.