Hull City owners threaten 50% rise in ticket prices if re-brand is denied

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Tiger madness continues at Hull City.

Since last fall Hull City’s owners, Assem and Ehab Allam, have been on a well-publicized campaign to change their clubs name from “Hull City ” to “Hull Tigers.” The issue is in the hands of the Football Association, who is set to decide on the proposed re-brand on April 9th.

If denied the rebrand — the Allam’s claim — the club may be forced to raise season ticket prices by almost 50%.

The reason?

The owners claim that at least two of their potentially major sponsorship deals for next season are contingent on the word “Tigers” becoming part of Hull’s name. Which just happens to be the sticking point of the Allam’s movement to change the name of the club – that the word “Tigers” is more marketable than “Hull City.”

It isn’t difficult to see the ticket threat as yet another ploy by Hull’s owners to influence the FA to rule in their favor. You can’t blame them for doing everything in their power to influence the FA’s hand.

But if the FA denies the name change and these deals go south, the onus falls squarely on the Hull owners. Predicating sponsorship deals on a re-branded name that the club has yet to secure is risky, foolish and an example of incredibly poor lawyering.

To then turn around and put the resulting burden (higher ticket prices) on the fans would be a gross error in judgment. Knowing that their re-brand stands a chance at being denied by the FA, the Allams have a legal and moral duty to secure future shirt sponsorship without conditioning such deals on a potential name change.