UEFA ‘Nations League’ can expect major backlash from club owners and managers

3 Comments

As a fan, it’s difficult to read about the UEFA ‘Nations League’ and not be excited for the new competition.

Another meaningful contest among top European nations?!?! A European international tournament that gives birth to another European international tournament?!?!

Freaking genius!

No more of these boring, largely meaningless friendlies that tell us next to nothing about the true potency of a national team.

Sure, those matches provide some tactical upside like being a means for managers to blood young talent and try out new formations. But from a purely supporters-based perspective, international friendly weekends suck — major letdowns that barely serve as a hit in fans eternal search for soccer ecstasy.

Which is exactly why just one week after an international friendly, most supporters have grown so despondent they’ve turned sport into religion. “Thank the Gods of Soccer, the [insert league/competition name here] is back. Thought I might not make it there for awhile…

So in that sense, a Nations League is more than a welcome addition to the soccer menu. But beneath pure, unbridled fandom lurks a very important consideration — the well-being of the players we all love. At what point does it all become too much?

Crucial to the 54 UEFA member associations push for the new ‘Nations League’ is the concept that club managers should get on board because the tournament will not add more matches to a player’s schedule. “We’re not taking any more dates so it’s the same 18 dates, the nine double-headers that we agreed we would work to,” said Alex Horne, General Secretary of England’s Football Association.

This point, of course, is a red herring.

Simply because there will not be a greater quantity of matches does not mean that a significant added strain will be placed on the players. Expect this to be a major point of contention from club owners and managers. As is, most clubs already hate international friendlies, which all too often result in a player returning back to the club injured (see, e.g. Jack Wilshere in England’s friendly v. Denmark on March 5th).

For club managers, a Nations League will only serve to increase the likelihood and frequency of their star players finding themselves on the trainer’s table. No longer will top European internationals be willing to sit out at any sign of breakdown or exhaustion. The inherent demand each player will feel to help his nation qualify for the Euros will be unrelenting. Prudence will become a thing of the past.

“I think better quality games make for better quality development of players and the club managers ought to embrace it,” Horne stated Thursday.

Good luck selling that message to the men who sign the checks.

 

Video: Ronaldo scores fourth goal, gives Portugal early lead

Maddie Meyer/Getty Images
Leave a comment

He has four goals in less than two matches, and Portugal is off to another flying start courtesy of their star forward.

[ MORE: Latest 2018 World Cup news ] 

Cristiano Ronaldo gave the Portuguese a 1-0 lead against Morocco in the fourth minute after brilliantly heading home a corner kick.

The Real Madrid star gave Portugal a similar spark at the beginning of their 3-3 draw against Spain in their first Group B match when Ronaldo drew, and scored a penalty kick inside of the opening three minutes.

Is there anything this man cannot do?

Reports: Alli unlikely to play in England’s second Group G match

AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth
Leave a comment

The Three Lions may not have taken all good news away from the team’s 2-1 win over Tunisia in their World Cup opener.

[ MORE: Russia races past Egypt, likely en route to next round ]

Several reports are suggesting that England will likely be without Tottenham playmaker Dele Alli in their second Group G match against Panama on Sunday.

Alli was forced out of England’s opener with a thigh strain, which gave manager Gareth Southgate the decision to put in Chelsea midfielder Ruben Loftus-Cheek.

There isn’t a timetable for the 22-year-old’s return to the pitch, but his absence will definitely present a major question for Southgate heading into the rest of group play.

Without Alli in the starting XI, it’ll likely be between Loftus-Cheek and Manchester United’s Jesse Lingard to fill the role where Alli normally sits.

In the case of Lingard, who started against Tunisia, the England boss would have to bring in another starter if Southgate opts to have the Red Devils attacker sit in as the number 10.

Report: Newcastle activates $12m release clause of ex-Arsenal youth

Photo by Burak Kara/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Reports out of Turkey say Newcastle United have finally struck the transfer market for a new No. 10.

[ MORE: West Ham adds Diop ]

Aksam reports that Rafa Benitez got the Magpies hierarchy to activate a near $12 million release clause for Besiktas midfielder Oguzhan Ozyakup.

The 25-year-old was part of Arsenal’s youth set-up until 2012, making two League Cup appearances in 2011-12 before moving to Besiktas.

Dutch-born Ozyakup is 35-times capped with a goal for Turkey, twice captaining the Crescent-Stars.

Ozyakup lost playing time to Talisca this season, and registered just four assists in 24 appearances. In 219 appearances for Besiktas, he’s posted 27 goals with 50 assists.

Like the move for Newcastle?

Lukaku pens inspiring post on hard-scrabble upbringing

AP Photo/Matthias Schrader
Leave a comment

Manchester United and Belgium striker Romelu Lukaku has an inspiring and emotional post in The Players’ Tribune which tugs at the heart strings and explains his competitive fire.

[ MORE: West Ham adds Diop ]

Lukaku talks about how his family’s poverty caused him to become a fierce competitor in the hopes of meeting his dreams head-on and providing for his family.

The Belgian, 25, scored twice in his side’s 3-0 World Cup-opening win over Panama earlier this week, and is now far removed from his youth, but he tells his story as if it lives fresh in his mind.

From The Players’ Tribune:

There were even times when my mum had to “borrow” bread from the bakery down the street. The bakers knew me and my little brother, so they’d let her take a loaf of bread on Monday and pay them back on Friday.

Lukaku also talks about racism in football, his debut for Anderlecht, and that aforementioned competitive drive. It’s 100 percent worth the read.