World Cup final Man of the Match rankings

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Germany has won the World Cup in extra time, outlasting Argentina who were up for the challenge but ultimately wasteful.

Lionel Messi wasn’t able to put the cherry on his legacy, but for Germany they put a handfull of near-misses behind them and capped off a two-decade long building process.

For a match that produced few goals, it was still full of individual performances, and that’s what we’re here to discuss.

Much of the action took place in the midfield, and that’s where we concentrate our list. But first, the hero…

5. Mario Götze

Not even born the last time Germany won the World Cup, the 22-year-old came on just as regulation came to a close, and replaced a legend. But it was he who produced the moment of brilliance, and that it was.

Settling Andre Schurrle’s cross with a chest touch and volleying home midair, he produced a moment his country and the world will never forget, and for that it’s impossible to ignore.

Götze is the youngest scorer in a World Cup final since Wolfgang Weber in 1966. Shots of him taking in the moment after the match were chill-inducing.

4. Ezequiel Garay

Argentina’s defense has to get credit in some way, and Garay was the best of the bunch

As the match went on, the Argentinian defense had to do more and more work, and for most of it they were up to the task. Martin Demichelis had himself a great match as well, but as they tired he did too, and was at fault for not tracking Mario Götze on the final blow, Germany’s goal.

Garay completed 35/40 passes including just two giveaways in his own half, and led the match with 11 clearances. He tracked Miroslav Klose very well, and had the most energy of his defense as the match waned on.  The Argentinian defense didn’t concede for nearly 500 minutes before Götze’s winner, and Garay was a leader at the back.

3. Jerome Boateng

From Argentina’s defense now to Germany’s defense, Boateng was a rock.  He often pressed up high to support the midfield, and pumped long balls up forward as well.  Those long balls ended up bringing his passing numbers down, but his marking abilities – even with the high line – were near perfect.

He also completed all six of his attempted tackles, meaning he was incredibly hard to beat on the ball. He won 4/6 duels in the air, and cleared the ball nine times.

His brother is embroiled in controversy with the Ghanan national team, but for Jerome, it’s delight at the end of the 2014 World Cup.

2. Javier Mascherano

Lionel Messi wore the captain’s armband, but it’s clear who ran the midfield: Mascherano. A star performance all tournament, Mascherano was a physical presence that punished Germany every time it tried to enter the middle of the pitch.

He probably should have earned a second yellow card a few times, but let off a couple of times, he rewarded his team.

Messi won the Golden Ball for player of the tournament (more on that ridiculous decision later) but Mascherano was the best player on the Argentinian team.

1. Bastian Schweinsteiger

This is actually a relatively obvious choice.  Punished repeatedly by physical Argentinian play, Schweinsteiger got up and responded every single time. When Sami Khedira went down just minutes before kickoff with an injury, young Christoph Kramer came in.

Schweinsteiger knew he would have to provide the youngster with cover already, but when Kramer himself got his bell rung and replaced by an attacker in Schurrle, it was the 29-year-old who took the middle of the pitch and made it his own.

As Messi felt the need to drop deeper and deeper into the midfield, he found himself smothered by Schweinsteiger, and he was able to distribute the passes as well.  He finished with 94 completed passes in 105 attempts, a 90% completion rate and the most completed passes of anyone on the field.

It’s not the first time Schweinsteiger’s put in a performance like this for either club or country, but he’d been somewhat of a princess this tournament, whining to the referee constantly and shying away from physicality, along with making silly challenges. Not today. He was the Schweinsteiger of old, and ruled the midfield of a World Cup final, and for that is our Man of the Match.

Pellegrini: West Ham focused on week-to-week, not table

Photo by Jordan Mansfield/Getty Images
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Manuel Pellegrini knows a thing or two about the patience required in building a contender over the long-term, and says this West Ham team has the ingredients to make a serious run in the Premier League.

The Irons hammered Manchester United 2-0 on Sunday at London’s Olympic Stadium, an impressive feat even given the Red Devils’ struggles.

[ RECAP: West Ham 2-0 Man Utd ]

It nets West Ham a fifth-straight result following a blowout loss to Man City to start the season.

“We have more quality, but we’re also more consistent and more solid,” Pellegrini said. “The international break was important for us because we had all the defenders and worked a lot to be more concentrated, to make better tackles and better movements.”

That doesn’t mean they can afford to look past anyone, especially an in-form Bournemouth team with top-half designs of its own under Eddie Howe.

“I think we must try to beat Bournemouth 1-0 in our next league game and then see what happens. We’re not thinking about the future.”

West Ham supporters certainly are, and if the attacking weapons are many if Manuel Lanzini and Andriy Yarmolenko have shaken their injury woes to join Sebastien Haller and Felipe Anderson as terrific components of the system.

Solskjaer “being very positive” despite disappointment in Man Utd loss

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Manchester United slumped to another defeat on Sunday, this time 2-0 at West Ham United, and lost another key attacker in the process.

Already missing Paul Pogba and Anthony Martial, the Red Devils saw Marcus Rashford limp off the pitch and Mason Greenwood unavailable to replace him due to tonsillitis.

[ RECAP: West Ham 2-0 Man Utd ]

Rashford is expected to be “out for a little while,” and manager Ole Gunnar Solskjaer is trying to put on a happy face despite another substandard performance.

He admits disappointment with the result and overall performance, but seems to imply it’s all part of a process for the Red Devils. From the BBC:

“At the moment we’re just all very flat. Key moments went against us. They had some great finishes. We just didn’t have the quality when we had those big moments. In the Premier League if you don’t take them you won’t get any points. It tipped in their favor and we just have to accept that.”

“I’m disappointed we didn’t win today, but apart from that I’m being very positive. I’ve said many times that there will be highs and lows. We’ve had some highs along the way, today we just have to accept we got no points and look forward to next week.”

Solskjaer says Martial and Greenwood should both be back soon, with a Cup tie against Rochdale before Arsenal visits Old Trafford on Monday.

AT HALF: Alexander-Arnold’s sensational goal highlight of wild 45 minutes

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An insane first half between Chelsea and Liverpool yielded three goals, two that counted, and one that was a thing of pure beauty at Stamford Bridge.

Trent Alexander-Arnold‘s goal was the beautiful part, while Roberto Firmino has also scored and Mason Mount‘s toe couldn’t skip past VAR in the run-up to Cesar Azpilicueta’s overruled goal.

A free kick atop the Chelsea 18 came Liverpool’s way after Andreas Christensen got tangled with Sadio Mane.

[ STREAM: Chelsea v. Liverpool (NBCSN) ]

A training ground play had Salah roll a shot pass for Alexander-Arnold to belt past Kepa Arrizabalaga in the 15th minute.

The goal is Alexander-Arnold’s first in 10 months for the Reds, who are bidding to go 6-0 to start the season. That’s above, and here’s Firmino’s below:

10-man Wolves level late against pitiful Palace defending

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Wolves fought back for a deserved point via a last-second equalizer, as Crystal Palace’s stoppage time silliness allowed a 1-1 draw at Selhurst Park on Sunday.

A Leander Dendoncker own goal put the Eagles in front, and Palace was up a man when Romain Saiss took his second yellow with 18 minutes to play.

[ MORE: Watch full PL match replays ]

But danger man Jeff Schlupp was denied in the box by star man Rui Patricio minutes before Diogo Jota capitalized on Palace allowed a silver platter cross to get to his feet.

Wolves are still winless, with four draws through six matches, and sit 19th. Palace’s eighth point has it 12th on the table.


Three things we learned

1. Ward giveth, and taketh away: Joel Ward forced the own goal that gave Palace the lead when his wild drive through traffic turned off Leander Dendoncker to defy Rui Patricio, but his inexplicable stooping, missed intervention on the game winner was stunning. More on that below.

2. Wolves fight to death to find easy winner: Adama Traore, Jonny Otto, and the Wolves attack did not bow their heads after Palace took their fortunate lead nor after Romain Saiss’ second yellow card sent them diown a man, and Nuno Espirito Santo will love how his men fought to the final whistle while making timely interventions at the back (and taking advantage of Palace misfires).

Wilfried Zaha was dispossessed and it took three uncontested passes down the left of the Palace shape for Traore to find himself one-on-one with Patrick Van Aanholt. The Dutch defender played off Traore, who simply swept a cross to the back post. A chest trap, volley or 900 other things from Joel Ward could’ve ended the game, but he tried and missed a diving header that allowed Jota two touches to roof into an empty cage.

3. Silly from Saiss should’ve sealed it: Romain Saiss was sitting on yellow for a foul on Wilfried Zaha when he went out of his way to foul the Ivorian right on the touch line. Both managers saw the clear foul up close and personal, and Nuno Espirito Santo will certainly not like the idea of trusting Saiss again after his automatic ban.

Man of the Match: Vicente Guaita — The Crystal Palace goalkeeper was sensational in the draw, and the only reason Wolves weren’t ahead well before the Dendoncker own goal.


[ MORE: Premier League schedule ]

An early corner kick led to a James McArthur goal mouth block of Leander Dendoncker’s low drive toward the near post, as Wolves got their first pressure on Palace following an opening 10 minutes that belonged largely to the hosts.

Palace’s Ayew headed a Luka Milivojevic corner into the arms of Rui Patricio in the 26th.

Vicente Guaita made the play of the first half when Raul Jimenez looped a cross over Mamadou Sakho to an unmarked Matt Doherty. The powered header was slapped away by a flying Guaita to keep it scoreless.

The keeper was again called upon when a 1-2 allowed Diogo Jota to lash a shot on goal in the 38th.

Palace took a stunning lead within 40 seconds of halftime, as Ward’s hard drive took a big turn off Dendoncker to spin past Patricio. The sequence began with Jeff Schlupp dribbling Willy Boly, the latter being imperious for most of his season.

By the time Romain Saiss was shown his second yellow for a fouls on Wilfried Zaha, the game felt academic. Would the 10-man Wolves find anything in the final 18 minutes?

The opposite, really, as Schlupp cued up substitute Christian Benteke which looked set for glory until the Belgian took an extra touch and drove into the arms of Patricio.