Jurgen Klinsmann, US veterans usher in new wave of talent to end 2014

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LONDON — Times, they are a changin’.

Down by the River Thames in London the USA will host No.3-ranked Colombia on Friday as a new era is being ushered in by the U.S. national teams’ veterans and head coach Jurgen Klinsmann.

[ PREVIEW: USA host Colombia at Fulham  ]

In a press conference at Fulham’s historic Craven Cottage stadium on Thursday, Klinsmann emphasized the need for his veterans to stand up and help integrate promising youngsters such as Bobby Wood, Julian Green, DeAndre Yedlin and many others.

The time is now.

“It is very important, the role that the veterans play. In many clubs nowadays you don’t see that anymore. You don’t see that leadership from more experienced players helping the younger guys to understand what it actually takes to become a real professional,” Klinsmann said when asked by ProSoccerTalk. “I was very lucky when I was coming up through the ranks, I had players looking after me who would give me a kick in my backside if I started flying too high. I follow that closely with many club situations where I don’t see that happening anymore.”

[ RELATED: Cameron on USA’s progress ]

Klinsmann revealed he mixed up his squad on purpose for this trip, and during practice all week you could hear the older guys dishing out copious amounts of praise towards the younger players. “Well done Julian!” “Keep going Bobby!” “Attaboy Brooksy!”

“We purposefully made that mixture now for this group,” Klinsmann explained. “I gave them the message, whether it is Brad [Guzan], Kyle Beckerman, Jermaine Jones, Nick Rimando. I told them you have to talk to [the young players] communicate with them. Leave your cellphones off the table. Give them ideas what to expect and how their growth should happen.”

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The USA’s veterans are playing a leading role as the team close out 2014.

The USA’s coach is looking forward to leading his team out at a packed stadium on Friday in West London — the game is expected to break attendance records for an international at the Cottage — while also giving plenty of youngsters the chance to shine.

[ RELATED: Ibarra eager to learn ]

Klinsmann has called up the likes of Rubio Rubin, Miguel Ibarra, Alfredo Morales, Stanford University’s Jordan Morris and Bobby Wood in the past two to three camps but used them sparingly. This final batch of international matches in 2014 could give us a glimpse of the future as the youngsters step up to the plate.

“We don’t want them to waste time. We want them to break in quickly if they can,” Klinsmann added. “If it takes longer, then so be it. We want them to have that open dialogue because they have all the power in the world to put them in line, if needed.”

[ RELATED: Guzan leading US goalkeeping core ]

In Klinsmann’s latest squad 12 players have less than 10 caps, while the same number are under the age of 24. The youth element is strong and four-time World Cup veteran DaMarcus Beasley, now 32, is playing a key part as a leader on this squad.

“These type of games are where you can challenge these young kids and see whether they can sink or swim,” Beasley said. “So far they have got a passing grade but it is a long four years until another World Cup. These games against quality opponents like Colombia on Friday and Ireland next week is preparation for them to prolong their international career.”

Beasley’s international career began in 2001 and he’s still going. Four World Cup squads and 120 caps later, the Indiana native is keen to do whatever he can to help out. Just like other U.S. players helped him out when he first arrived on the scene.

“One of the guys played here,” Beasley smiled, looking up to the old iron rafters at Craven Cottage. “Brian McBride. He’s a guy that was always full of information and willing to help the young kids. Claudio Reyna. Eddie Pope, when I was younger they were always looking to bring a young guy under their wing and help them in any way. On and off the field. We definitely want to do the same thing as we pass the torch going into 2016, 2017… maybe some of the older guys such as myself won’t be here. So we want to make sure the U.S. national team is in good hands.”

[ RELATED: Besler on SKC, enjoying life in London ]

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Beasley, and other US veterans, have been asked to take the young guys under their wing.

Klinsmann agrees with Beasely, as a strong core of leaders has always defined the U.S. national team across generations and helped his team advance to the knockout stages at the World Cup this summer.

“I think that is a characteristic of the U.S. team for a long time. Long before I came on board,” Klinsmann said. “The experienced players always helped the younger ones and there’s always a special chemistry and a good spirit. That spirit was part of our path getting out of the ‘Group of Death’ this summer at the World Cup. Their role is vital.”

Goalkeeper Brad Guzan is settling into the leadership role, as he works alongside young stoppers such as Sean Johnson and Bill Hamid. With Tim Howard out of the picture until next September, Guzan is happy with the role Klinsmann is asking him to take on and believes a strong bond is developing among the USA’s current crop of players.

“The group is slowly coming together,” Guzan said. “That’s nice to see because there are some new faces and a few guys now that have been in one or two camps, where you would think they have been in five or ten camps. It is an easy group to come in to and the young guys train really well. From that aspect the week has gone well. And, more importantly, off the field the group is really coming together.”

Can this group of talented youngsters headlined by Yedlin and Green oust some veterans, and others who didn’t make this trip, off the roster? These two friendlies over the next week will have a big say if they’re ready to do just that.

“They are a hungry group, they are exciting and they want to do well, to prove themselves and prove they belong here, which they have done so far.” Beasley said. “We are excited about the future of this team.”

Veterans and youngsters intertwined, Klinsmann’s experiment of meshing age groups will be under the spotlight at Craven Cottage on Friday night, then again in Dublin next Tuesday. After that match we will have a good idea if times are a changin’ for good for the U.S. national team.

Bernardo Silva banned over Benjamin Mendy tweet

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Manchester City winger Bernardo Silva has been banned for one-game after being found guilty of breaching FA Rule E3(1).

Silva posted a message on his Twitter account on September 22 with a photo of close friend and City teammate Benjamin Mendy next to a mascot for Spanish confectionery brand Conguitos.

He posted the message “Guess who?” above the photos before deleting it and then saying “Can’t even joke with a friend these days… You Guys…”

Along with the one-game ban, Silva was also fined $64,000 and must complete face-to-face education after admitting the charge.

Below is the FA’s statement in full:

Bernardo Silva has been suspended for one first team competitive fixture, fined £50,000 and must complete face-to-face education after admitting a breach of FA Rule E3.

“The Manchester City midfielder’s social media activity on 22 September 2019 breached FA Rule E3(1), as it was insulting and/or improper and/or brought the game into disrepute, and constituted an “Aggravated Breach”, which is defined in FA Rule E3(2), as it included reference, whether expressed or implied, to race and/or colour and/or ethnic origin.”

The ban will see Silva miss Man City’s home game against Chelsea on Saturday, Nov. 23 (Watch live, 12:30 p.m. ET on NBC and online via NBCSports.com) and this ban seems more lenient than many were expecting as all parties agreed to the sanctions and Silva’s previous good behavior was taken into account.

Also, here is a look at some of their mitigating circumstances when it came to investigating the situation and handing out the sanctions.

David Villa announces retirement

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Legendary Spanish forward David Villa, 37, has announced his retirement.

Villa will end his playing career on Jan. 1, 2019 as his final game will be for current team Vissel Kobe, if they reach the Emperor’s Cup final in Japan.

The former Sporting Gijon, Real Zaragoza, Valencia, Barcelona, Atletico Madrid, New York City FC and Melbourne City star holds the record for being Spain’s all-time leading goalscorer (with 59 goals in 98 appearances) and won the 2010 World Cup and 2008 European Championships as a key part of their golden generation.

He also won two La Liga titles and the UEFA Champions League with Barcelona and another La Liga with Atletico Madrid as he scored 376 goals in 752 appearances and also won Copa del Rey trophies with Barca, Atletico, Zaragoza and Valencia.

“After 19 years as a professional, I have decided to retire from playing football at the end of this season. Thank you to all the teams, coaches and teammates that have allowed me to enjoy this dreamed career,” Villa said. “Thank you to my family, that has always been there to support me. It is my objective to put the cherry on top by winning the Emperor’s Cup with Vissel Kobe on January 1st. From then on, I will continue to enjoy football through all the projects that we’re currently developing with DV7 group. Thank you for all the love.”

Villa announced on Tuesday that he is part of the ownership group which will bring a USL Championship side to Queens, New York City. The plan is for Queensboro FC to start play in 2021 in the second-tier of North American soccer and Villa is expected to be a key part of the organization as he heads back to NYC.

During his four seasons in Major League Soccer he was the shinning light for New York City FC and was a model professional as well as being a great goalscorer in the Bronx.

His legendary status will live on, with his goals and performances so key to some of the biggest moments in Spanish, and world, soccer history.

Finland close to first major finals: “It will go crazy”

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The temperatures are plummeting and the days are getting shorter as another harsh winter approaches in Finland.

Expectations around the country’s soccer team are rising, though, like never before.

On Friday, Finland could seal a place in the finals of a major soccer tournament for the first time in its history. All that’s needed is a home win over Liechtenstein, one of the world’s weakest teams, in Helsinki and the Finns will take their place in next year’s European Championship.

After so many past disappointments, it is a day many in this Nordic country of 5.5 million inhabitants – better known for its hockey team, rally drivers and javelin throwers – thought would never arrive.

It is one that could transcend soccer, changing the mentality of a nation.

“There are always skeptics – with a sort of `Ah, they are never going to do it anyway’ feeling – in more or less everything we do, whether it is music, anything,” said former Finland player Aki Riihilahti, who is now CEO of Finnish champion HJK Helsinki. “The Finnish nature is that only when there comes an external acknowledgement of an achievement do we go and support it.

“For what this will mean, it is more important mentally than factually.”

Finland has had better teams down the years, on paper anyway. They’ve had more celebrated players, too – think of Jari Litmanen, the silky playmaker for Ajax and Barcelona, and Sami Hyypia, the defensive stalwart at Liverpool. Yet getting to a World Cup or European Championship has been beyond them, despite more than 80 years of trying.

Finland remains, somewhat embarrassingly, the only major Nordic country to have never qualified for a major tournament.

So what’s changed? The hiring of a former primary school teacher as coach has plenty to do with it.

Markku Kanerva was promoted to the job in December 2016, having previously been an assistant with the team and a former player in the 1980s and ’90s. He inherited a team that had gone all of 2016 without a win and also one that was about to lose some of its best players. One midfielder, Roman Eremenko, received a two-year ban for testing positive for cocaine in 2016; another, Perparim Hetemaj, would go on to retire in early 2018 to focus on his club career.

Kanerva took a pragmatic view of the team, picking players according to their individual strengths rather than a pre-existing style and reverting to a straightforward 4-4-2 formation. His approach was based on hard work and strong defensive shape, and relied on the country’s most high-profile player – striker Teemu Pukki – poaching some goals at the other end.

Kanerva also approaches coaching like he would teaching, encouraging his players to interact more, take responsibility, and learn what they have done wrong so they can improve.

The results have been striking. Finland won its group in the inaugural UEFA Nations League competition after winning its opening four qualifying games, earning promotion to League B and guaranteeing a playoff spot for Euro 2020 that might not be necessary.

In Euro 2020 qualifying, the Finns reacted to an opening loss to Italy by winning four straight Group J games without conceding a goal. After eight games, they are in second place, behind already qualified Italy but five points ahead of both Bosnia-Herzegovina and Armenia. With two teams advancing automatically, Finland needs one win from its final two qualifiers over the coming days, starting with last-place Liechtenstein, to make history.

“This is the missing piece of the puzzle,” said Marco Casagrande, general secretary of the Football Association of Finland. “All the other things in our sports we have managed to do, but this is something that’s still separating us from being a real sports country.”

Finland’s underperformance on the international stage was bought into sharp focus by Iceland, a tiny Nordic brother with a population of just 330,000, reaching both Euro 2016 and last year’s World Cup.

Casagrande recalls speaking to his colleagues at the Icelandic FA, asking them: “So what’s your secret?”

“It didn’t help,” Casagrande said, “when everyone was saying, `You are losing all the games and Iceland is going to the Euros. Come on guys, what are you doing?”‘

Iceland’s rise was based on a strong collective effort combined with a sprinkle of stardust by its one standout player, Gylfi Sigurdsson, and Finland is pretty much the same.

While goalkeeper Lukas Hradecki, who plays in Germany for Bayer Leverkusen, gets plenty of plaudits, most of the spotlight falls on Pukki, the hard-working striker who has scored seven goals in qualifying and made a strong start to his first season in the Premier League with Norwich.

“Teemu Pukki is really somebody who everybody seems to love,” said Riihilahti, who also played in England’s top division with Crystal Palace, “and has been adopted as the Finnish savior who is bringing us to the promised land.”

When Finland won the men’s hockey world championship this year for the first time since 2011, there were wild celebrations in central Helsinki as champagne-swilling fans braved the cold weather by stripping off and taking a swim in the fountain and climbing on the famous Havis Amanda statue.

Expect more of the same if the country’s soccer players finally make the long-awaited international breakthrough.

“Finnish people would all celebrate like a big festival,” Riihilahti said. “It will go crazy.”

More AP soccer: https://apnews.com/apf-Soccer and https://twitter.com/AP-Sports

Steve Douglas is at http://www.twitter.com/sdouglas80

Top 25 players in the USMNT pool right now

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Christian Pulisic is the best American soccer player in the world.

Of this, there is little debate.

But there is a debate to who is second, third, and well down the line, and we’ve got our last chance to really assess the full crop with Major League Soccer now out of season for a few months.

[ USMNT: Most to gain/lose from November ]

Let’s set some ground rules:

  • The ranking is meant to illustrate who would be most likely to positively affect a USMNT match, regardless of manager or teammates, right now.
  • Health doesn’t matter to our rankings if a current injury isn’t one which could drastically alter the player’s skill set moving forward.
  • Age/potential/experience doesn’t matter either, at least not much; It’s how likely you are to contribute to the team if put on the field right now. Obviously Chris Richards of Bayern Munich II is a better long-term prospect than 32-year-old Tim Ream, but most would rather have the Fulham man in a big spot right now.

Top 25 USMNT players – November 2019

*not currently a part of USMNT squad due to injury
**not currently a part of USMNT squad due to coach’s decision

  1. Christian Pulisic, Chelsea*
  2. Tyler Adams, RB Leipzig*
  3. John Brooks, Wolfsburg
  4. Weston McKennie, Schalke
  5. Alfredo Morales, Fortuna Dusseldorf
  6. Sergino Dest, Ajax
  7. Jordan Morris, Seattle Sounders
  8. Matt Miazga, Reading (on loan from Chelsea)**
  9. Josh Sargent, Werder Bremen
  10. Zack Steffen, Fortuna Dusseldorf (on loan from Man City)*
  11. DeAndre Yedlin, Newcastle United
  12. Jozy Altidore, Toronto FC*
  13. Tim Ream, Fulham
  14. Timothy Weah, Lille*
  15. Julian Green, Greuther Furth**
  16. Cristian Roldan, Seattle Sounders
  17. Ike Opara, Minnesota United**
  18. Michael Bradley, Toronto FC*
  19. Fabian Johnson, Borussia Monchengladbach**
  20. Cameron Carter-Vickers, Stoke City (on loan from Spurs)**
  21. Tyler Boyd, Besiktas
  22. Sebastian Lletget, LA Galaxy
  23. Miles Robinson, Atlanta United*
  24. Paul Arriola, DC United
  25. Jackson Yueill, San Jose Earthquakes

Next up, established: Antonee Robinson (Wigan Athletic), Walker Zimmerman (LAFC), Eric Lichaj (Hull City), Paxton Pomykal (FC Dallas), Ethan Horvath (Club Brugge), Reggie Cannon (FC Dallas), Duane Holmes (Derby County), Bill Hamid (DC United).

Next up, youth: Konrad de la Fuente (Barcelona U19), Alex Mendez (Ajax U19), Giovanni Reyna (Borussia Dortmund U19), Ulysses Llanez (Wolfsburg U19), Chris Richards (Bayern Munich II), Richie Ledezma (PSV Eindhoven), Donovan Pines (DC United), Sam Vines (Colorado Rapids)