Has Jozy Altidore’s Premier League legacy damaged the reputation of US players?

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With Jozy Altidore’s move back to Major League Soccer confirmed on Friday, my thoughts immediately switched to the legacy he will leave behind in the Premier League following two goals in 68 appearances with Hull City and, most recently, Sunderland.

[ RELATED: Altidore swap confirmed ]

Altidore, 25, arrived at the Stadium of Light with the world at his feet in July 2013 as he signed for the Black Cats from AZ Alkmaar in a $13 million deal after becoming the highest scoring U.S. player in Europe in history (31 goals with AZ in 2012-13) and was supposed to be Paolo Di Canio’s main striker up top.

But within a month the manager who bought him was fired and Altidore’s confidence in front of goal plummeted throughout his 18-month spell on Wearside. In the end, he quite simply had to get out of England. For most of his stay at Sunderland, home fans were supportive and genuinely wanted him to succeed. But after being given numerous chances to shine by incoming boss Gus Poyet, Altidore failed to take any of them despite brief glimpses of hope.

[ RELATED: Klinsmann: “Altidore good for 4, 5 goals at World Cup” ]

Being in England throughout Altidore’s time at Sunderland and watching his career slowly unravel from a forward going through a sticky patch to him being labelled the worst signing and/or striker in PL history, it was tough to see a man who we’ve all seen flourish time and again with the U.S. national team struggling through one cameo display after another. But the bigger issue here is about the legacy Altidore has left behind for U.S. players aiming to make a career in the Premier League. Has his lack of goals and shocking misses for Sunderland impacted the reputation of American players in England?

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Altidore’s struggles at Sunderland were much talked about in England.

Maybe. Maybe not. Most coaches, pundits and fans in the PL may just look at it as Altidore had a bad spell and every player should be judged on their individual merits. But there’s still a stigma which remains surrounding American players in England, and Europe, for that matter. Altidore’s dreadful time in the PL will only act to reinforce the fact that U.S. players still have a long way to go in order to gain the respect of the so-called “soccer nations” as time goes on.

After Altidore recently missed from four-yards out for Sunderland during their 1-1 draw with West Ham United in December, the U.S. striker was hammered by the press in the UK. Sadly, it was not for the first time. The Sky Sports panel obliterated Altidore in this rant, for failing to not convert the simple tap-in. National TV and radio shows have all jumped on the bandwagon and I’ve lost count of the number of times I tried to defend Altidore’s performances in press boxes to English journalists who asked things like “is he this bad for the USA?” or “he has to be the worst player in PL history, right?”

[ RELATED: Geoff Cameron: Hazard “best I’ve played against” in PL ]

Altidore definitely isn’t the worst player in Premier League history, but the sad fact is that the general population will forget his incredible performance for Sunderland away at Newcastle during their 3-0 derby win last January and the penalty he won at Stamford Bridge against Chelsea when Sunderland inflicted Jose Mourinho’s only home defeat in the PL as Chelsea boss. So, Altidore has shown brief glimpses of the influential player he can be, but it happened sporadically throughout his 18-month stay at the Stadium of Light.

On his unveiling with Toronto FC, here’s what Altidore had to say about his struggles with Sunderland.

“As a professional, there are going to be times when everything is not perfect,” Altidore said. “In those times, how you react to those moments will define you. For me, it was a very difficult time for a number of reasons on and off the field in England. But I have a great support system in my family and I was still able to perform at the highest level with the U.S. national team.”

Sure he didn’t score much, but there’s more to his game than that. When I asked Jurgen Klinsmann about Altidore’s situation at Sunderland following the New Jersey native netting a penalty in the USA’s 2-1 friendly defeat to Colombia last November, the USMNT head coach was adamant Altidore would have scored 4-5 goals at the World Cup and made a huge difference had he not pulled his hamstring in the opening game vs. Ghana. Cue mumbled laughs from some sections of the assembled press, both U.S. and English.

[ RELATED: Altidore misses sitter for Sunderland vs. West Ham ]

When confident and given the ability to be the main man, Altidore can deliver what you ask of him. He can hold up the ball, bring others into the game, run at defenses and, yes, score goals. But now he has left the PL and returned to the relative warm cocoon of MLS where his career began with the New York Red Bulls and everyone expects him to score bucket loads of goals for Toronto, what reputation is he leaving behind in the PL for U.S. players?

I’d argue it is a damaged one. Not because he didn’t try hard or he sulked when things went wrong. It was just the sheer lack of nous and confidence he possessed in front of goal, but perhaps that was to be expected as plenty of players stepping up from scoring goals in the Dutch Eredivisie in the past have struggle to adapt to the PL. Altidore wasn’t the first and won’t be the last to challenge himself to play in the best league and not quite make the cut. But the likes of Clint Dempsey, Brian McBride and Landon Donovan have all helped to pave the way for American players to have a career in the PL. Given his poor displays, whether it’s his fault or not, Altidore could see all of that hard work from those aforementioned stars take a hit.

Maybe Altidore’s poor displays in the PL won’t harm the image of American players to the English, European and global audience who tune in every week to watch in their hundreds of millions. I hope not.

But maybe the next generation of American youngsters playing in England like DeAndre Yedline, Emerson Hyndman or even Gedion Zelalem will now have to deal with jibes of “ah, he’s just another Altidore” every time they put a foot wrong. Whether or not it’s his fault, Altidore’s legacy in England may have harmed the future of U.S. players heading to the Premier League. Then again, maybe it was just the wrong player signing for the wrong club at the wrong time.

Mane undergoes hand surgery

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The “FIFA virus” is hitting Liverpool hard this month.

Sadio Mane, who reportedly broke his left thumb on international duty for Senegal, underwent surgery on Wednesday, Liverpool confirmed. The club did not include a timetable for Mane’s return in its press release, only saying, “Mane’s recovery will be monitored over the next couple of days ahead of the Reds’ return to action at Huddersfield Town on Saturday.”

With the injury, Mane joins Mo Salah, Naby Keita and Virgil Van Dijk as Reds to be injured during the international break.

As an attacker, it’s unlikely Mane really needs the use of his left hand other than to protect himself on aerial challenges on bumps from defenders, but depending on the recovery, it may just be a decision of how much pain Mane could tolerate. With matches against Huddersfield, Red Star Belgrade and Cardiff City to come, maybe this is a good time for Jurgen Klopp to rest some of his starters, including the walking wounded like Mane.

Fulham owner withdraws offer to purchase Wembley Stadium

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Wembley Stadium is set to stay in the FA’s hands.

[READ: USMNT 1-1 Peru: Player Ratings]

The FA announced in a press release Wednesday that Fulham owner Shahid Kahn had withdrawn his offer of $790 million to purchase Wembley Stadium. Kahn first became interested in buying the stadium in February 2017, when he and FA CEO Martin Glenn met at the Superbowl. What followed was an informal offer to the FA Board of Directors before a formal offer was made.

The offer has been valued at anywhere from nearly $800 million to nearly $1.2 billion. In a statement, Kahn said that his goal to purchase the stadium was to provide the FA with a large amount of capital which it could use to improve grassroots soccer around the country.

“The intent of my efforts was, and is, to do right by everyone in a manner that strengthens the English game and brings people together, not divides them,” Khan said. “Unfortunately, given where we are today, I’ve concluded that the outcome of a vote next week would be far from sufficient in expressing the broad support favored by the FA chairman to sell Wembley Stadium.”

The FA council was set to vote on the sale next week.

Although it cost the FA and British government more than $1.4 billion (adjusted for inflation) to renovate and rebuild Wembley Stadium, the arena hosted 33 events between July 2016 and June 2017 and in its latest published financial records, the FA recorded an after-tax profit of $21 million. So it seems that along with the sponsorships and broadcast deals, Wembley Stadium is a money maker, which makes it important for the FA to hold on to.

That being said, it’s hard to turn down a deal worth close to $1 billion, even if that’s a lump sum and they won’t receive further investments from stadium revenues in the future. In the future, maybe Kahn or another owner may make another offer, one that the FA council could accept.

Report: La Liga chief going to court to compel U.S. based games to happen

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The head of La Liga is considering taking extraordinary action to ensure that a planned match this year in the U.S. goes off as expected.

[READ: What did we learn about the USMNT?]

According to Spanish radio station Cadena Cope, La Liga president Javier Tebas is set to bring a lawsuit against the Spanish Football Federation (RFEF) and its chief, Luis Rubiales to compel the federation to approve Barcelona’s match against Girona on January 26, which has been scheduled to be moved to Miami, Fla.’s Hard Rock Stadium.

In a way, it makes sense that Tebas and the Spanish league is considering every possible avenue to ensure that their 15-year marketing rights agreement with Relevant Sports, including league matches played abroad, can move forward as expected. However, it was clear after the announcement in August that all parties involved – especially La Liga, had not thought this through. FIFA, the RFEF, local fans and the Spanish league’s player’s union have all opposed the news, and on Wednesday Real Madrid formally sent a letter of it’s disapproval in moving La Liga matches abroad.

Tebas and La Liga would prefer for this to be resolved legally sooner rather than later, so they can market the Barcelona match in Miami and begin negotiating with the other federations that need to approve. But there’s a decent chance that the other parties – FIFA, and U.S. Soccer – could fail to rubber stamp what would be a first-of-its-kind event. In any case, watch this space.

What did we learn about USMNT during international break

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The U.S. Men’s National Team finished the October FIFA international slate with a somewhat demoralizing loss and an uplifting draw, if there is such a thing.

The young U.S. core continues to show flashes of great talent, but overall the team still seems to be stuttering along under caretaker manager Dave Sarachan, who just managed his 10th game and could likely finish out the calendar year as USMNT boss.

[ MORE: Premier League stats ]

Below is a look at the key takeaways from the USMNT’s October friendlies:


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