Three things we learned from the USMNT’s loss to Costa Rica

AP
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There’s really not much to say about the United States’ loss to Costa Rica tonight.

Following a disappointing, disheartening, uninspired loss to Mexico, the USMNT traveled to Red Bull Arena and put in a disappointing, disheartening, uninspired performance against Costa Rica.

[ RECAP: USMNT 0-1 Costa Rica ]

With World Cup qualifying starting in November, there’s a lot to improve on in a short period of time. Here’s what we learned…

THE MIDFIELD IS BARREN WITHOUT BRADLEY

Michael Bradley is the captain of this team, and has been the United States’ best and most consistent field player. His importance to the side was evident tonight, as the midfield looked lost without their leader. Danny Williams got the start in place of Bradley and had himself a nightmare. Williams couldn’t hold possession in the middle of the field, and his giveaways put added pressure on the defense. Jermaine Jones wasn’t much better, as he was yanked at halftime and replaced by Mix Diskerud. With Jones and Kyle Beckerman both on the wrong side of 30, their international careers are coming to an end and won’t be in the equation for long moving forward. Danny Williams had his chance to prove his worth tonight, and failed miserably.

[ PLAYER RATINGS: Howard’s return highlights poor performances from USMNT ]

SHEA COULD USE A RUN OF MATCHES

Despite earning his 34th cap for the USMNT tonight, Brek Shea has never really been given a prolonged run with the national team. Originally a high-flying winger, Shea has been used as both a midfielder and outside-back for Orlando City this year, and playing alongside Kaka has helped develop his skill-set. Shea is good from set pieces and has scored before from free kicks for the U.S., and with the way they are playing right now, those situations create their few opportunities on goal. While there is still room for improvement for Shea, he brings a bit of pace and creativity that the side lacks, and a run of games could give him the confidence to become an impact player.

HOWARD IS THE STARTING GOALKEEPER

Brad Guzan has what it takes to be a starting goalkeeper for a national side, but not when his competition is Tim Howard. Guzan isn’t to blame for any of the United States’ poor results over the summer or this fall, but simply put, Howard is better. Despite Guzan being five years younger than Howard (Tim is 36), goalkeepers can play deep into their 30’s at an elite level, and Howard looks to be one of those players. Throughout World Cup qualifying, Howard should get the nod as the number one choice, and it shouldn’t be debated.