England women’s team supports USWNT in equal pay battle

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Two members of the English women’s national team have thrown their support behind the members of the USWNT who have launched a wage discrimination lawsuit against U.S. Soccer.

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Last week Hope Solo, Alex Morgan, Megan Rapinoe, Carli Lloyd and Becky Sauerbrunn claimed they are acting on behalf of the entire women’s national team as they want to be paid the same amount as the U.S. men’s national team, who could earn up to fourth times more than the USWNT.

U.S. Soccer has since responded, saying they are “disappointed” with the claim and USSF president Sunil Gulati has insisted that U.S. Soccer respects the current World Cup and Olympic champions.

Speaking to Sky Sports in the UK on Tuesday, England’s Alex Scott and Farah Williams supported what the USWNT players are fighting for, even though in England they aren’t in a similar position to be demanding equal pay with the men’s national team.

“I think it’s great they they’re doing that,” Scott said. “They have fought hard and they’ve won a lot of World Cups and Olympics, so they think that’s right for them. Over here we are in a different place with our league and the FA already support us, so it’s great for them. It’s been a leading nation.”

Williams agreed with that viewpoint and went as far as pointing towards the USMNT struggling on the international stage compared to their female counterparts.

“The USA team for years have dominated the women’s game and probably have showcased themselves more than the men,” Williams said. “So they probably feel equal pay for them is the right thing.”

The next crucial date in the USWNT’s battle against U.S. Soccer is a court hearing in Chicago on May 25 which will determine when the current collective bargaining agreement runs until.

U.S. Soccer claims that the current CBA expires at the end of 2016, while the USWNT players in question argue that the CBA is void after they signed a memorandum of understanding back in 2013.