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New York City’s Jack Harrison on meteoric rise: “It can only get better”

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(By Jack Harrison, speaking to Joe Prince-Wright)

BACK TO THE START

When I think back to the start of my journey to the USA, it was all my mom, really. I didn’t really have anything to do with it until later on. She was looking for me to go elsewhere when I was around 11 or 12 and in the academy at Manchester United, just because she wanted me to have a better education and something to fall back on if soccer didn’t work out. She spoke to a couple of people and did her own research and it was recommended to her that I come over my freshman year of high school. That was at the age of 14. When I was around 13 she introduced this idea to me.

I was really apprehensive at first. All of the little kids in the academies in England, they all think the same way. They all want to make the first team and that’s it. It is the only thing they’ve got in their brain. She helped me to have an open mind and she said to me ‘go there and visit and if you like it you can stay out there and if you don’t, you can just come back and we can figure something out.’

We didn’t have enough money for us both to travel out to America at the same time. Once I visited Berkshire School, it was amazing. One of the best experiences that I’ve had, the fact that you can go to school, get a good education and play soccer every day. The facilities there, the community there, everything was just so welcoming. It was just so nice.

In truth, I never doubted my decision to come to the USA. The support system I had at Berkshire was amazing. I am a very independent person so I’ve always kind of been by myself. I like living away from home. That wasn’t a big thing for me. I’ve grown up an only child so to be in a dorm was just like a dream come true really.

I had a lot of fun and I could talk to my friends if I had any problems or anything like that. My coach, Jon Moodey, was the biggest support for me I guess. Just because through soccer he would do anything he could to have me out on the field. Then off the field he would help me out as much as he could as well. His family has been like my second family since I’ve been out here. The only issue was the homework at first because in England it’s not really required. You’re supposed to do it but if you don’t, it’s not going to impact much. Whereas over here, it goes towards your grade. It took me a while to manage my time and get my homework done but apart from that the lifestyle and everything was pretty easy to adjust to just because of all the support I had around me.

I have so much to thank my mom for. My mom and dad split up when I was three and ever since she has done nothing but want the best for me and do everything she can for me. Without her I definitely wouldn’t be where I am today. I’ve only got her to thank really for allowing me to have this opportunity to be out here and doing the things I’m doing right now. It’s all down to her.


THE BIG LEAP ACROSS THE POND

When I think about the future, I’m not sure what lies ahead. That’s exciting. I’m only 19 and I’m in the last stages of my green card process right now. I’m not sure what steps are in order to get citizenship but I think that’s something further down the line. That will potentially take a while anyway and right now I am just focusing on being here and doing whatever I can to help this club.

Looking back on my journey to this point, speaking to anyone in England I’d recommend the route I took to come to the USA at a young age. I know it’s hard to be away from home at such a young age but if you look at the benefits and the outcome of most people who come out here, it’s all been pretty successful. It’s been worth it with the connections you make and I’m just surprised that more people don’t do it to be honest because it is an opportunity you can’t really pass on.

A lot of English kids don’t know the opportunity is out there to do this. When I was first announcing I was leaving to play soccer in the States, everyone was like ‘oh. Why are you going over there to play soccer?’ It is actually much better than what I expected and I don’t think that people in England realize that the standard here is definitely growing now and developing. It is a lot better than what people think and it can only get better from here on out with the players they are bringing in and the youth players developing with the academies now as well. It is only going to keep growing and I think a lot of people in England need to realize that.

Despite what some people may say, college is a good environment to be in for young players. From the high school I was in at Berkshire, it prepared me pretty well in terms of the types of routines you get in for the day but the standard is definitely getting better in college. There is a lot of good development that goes on. I think it is completely different to what it’s like in Europe. Obviously you have the educational piece which is a part of it and I think that’s a massive difference. It is kind of hard to compare the systems in Europe and the USA because the schooling, although some people might not think it, it takes a lot away from the professional side of being a football player.

Like I say, it’s tough to compare. Where I was at, Wake Forest, they did the best they could to create this professional environment. It was good that way but it will never be as good as it could be because of the school side, which is also important. I’m not saying we should get rid of it because it is two massive parts. There’s just a difference between here and Europe. Adding the educational part on too is tough.


GOING PRO

The start to my rookie season was hardly ideal… The injury I suffered was a massive setback. It was a new experience for me. I was just glad to have the support around me. The trainers, Patrick Vieira and then doing rehab with Frank [Lampard] was an experience I will never forget. All the guys have just been great with me so far. That’s really showing in the way we are playing now as a team. We are obviously doing well, at the top of the league and stuff. Patrick has got some great ideas and everyone is believing in him. You can see that in the way we are playing.

Patrick is very demanding. At the same time he can relate to you and makes you feel comfortable. He asks a lot from you and he is never satisfied with what we are doing. There is always something we can do better and I think that’s a good thing because that’s how you improve and develop as a team. That’s the reason why we are playing the way we are today because of him and his attitude towards the team. He is a lot of fun to be around. He makes it enjoyable to come in every day. He’s been a great coach so far.

On the field the likes of Lampard, David Villa and Andrea Pirlo have just been amazing, offering their experiences to the group and to myself. People of my age and even those that are older, all we can do is listen and try and take on board what they are saying and try and perform that. That’s been the best part really. These guys, they don’t think they are better than anybody else. That’s a nice part about them because it makes you feel more comfortable around them and when you play with them. They definitely add a lot to this team.

When they talk you listen and being around them, you get the whole package. They give you lots of advice about the little things on the field. It is easier for me to communicate with Frank, speaking the same language, but David has been a lot of help too offering his knowledge and help and Pirlo is still working on his English but he tries to help communicate what might help me in a game. I just try and do my best to take it all in and try and perform what they want doing. It has been good, they have been great on and off the field.

If you look at the players on our team, there’s no reason why we shouldn’t be up there with the top teams this season. As soon as Patrick came in, what he wanted was for the club to be successful and we want to win something at the end of the year. With the way we are playing right now and the way he is coaching, it is all starting to come together. I think it can only get better from here as long as we keep humble and keep working hard.


THE FUTURE

One day it would be nice to go back and play in England and the Premier League. Obviously we will have to see what happens down the road but right now I am just trying to focus on doing what I can here. If the opportunity comes up then we can discuss that after the season but that would be a dream come true, to play in the Premier League in front of all those people and at that standard as well. I think that’s something further down the road.

Everyone asks me if I would prefer to represent the USA or England at national team level. I get that question a lot. But, the truth is there’s been no contact from either the U.S. or England. It would be nice to represent my home country and wear that badge on my shirt but at the same time, if the interest is not there, then I’m open to play for the U.S. I think that is something for down the road. It is something to think about later, but right now I just want to focus on being at New York City FC.

When I was growing up I always looked up to the likes of Ronaldinho, Zidane, Michael Owen, David Beckham, all those kinds of players. But I’ve always been a massive Liverpool fan so Steven Gerrard has been up there as well.

Ahead of our game against LA Galaxy last weekend I was like, “I might have to put in a tackle on him…!’ No, no. I’m just joking! It was an amazing experience and something not many people can say they’ve done. Obviously being alongside Frank, I was on the other side of the Liverpool-Chelsea rivalry and we managed to grind out a win! It was awesome to end up facing one of my idols in Stevie G.

Marketing Pulisic: Catching up with BVB director Carsten Cramer

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Borussia Dortmund is taking its talents to our shores this summer, and ProSoccerTalk had a chance to speak to the club on its efforts in America and back home in the Bundesliga.

[ MORE: Pulisic rips up Liverpool ]

Naturally, American fans are very interested in anything Christian Pulisic, and PST is very interested in how a club like BVB goes about marketing one of the first internationally recognizable U.S. teen stars (or at least the first of serious consequence since Landon Donovan).

Near hat tricks market themselves — Pulisic had two goals and played a huge part in the third as Loris Karius parried his shot right to Jacob Bruun Larsen — but there’s plenty more to our discussion with BVB marketing director Carsten Cramer.

ProSoccerTalk: BVB is a gigantic club with a huge fan base already here, but the growing interest of the American market is clearly ripe to become someone’s new favorite club. How do you balance the need to cater to both on a trip like this?

Carsten Cramer: “You described it well and with the right words. We know about the interest of Americans in football generally, and we also know that a club like Borussia Dortmund which is a little bit different from the other big clubs and seems to draw the attention of American people as well. If you know these two characteristics of the American market, it’s a kind of logical consequence that a club like Dortmund which has internationalization as very important for growth, makes a decision to come to the U.S. after traveling three years in a row to Asia. Christian Pulisic is one of the Top 11 in our team. Although we had a difficult season, he played a good one. He’s now 19. He’s at the right age to lead and run this team for the U.S. visit.”

PST: How would you compare traveling to the U.S. with Pulisic to heading to Japan with Shinji Kagawa?

CC: “It’s always good if you have a player from the market. They are definitely a door opener. It’s a kind of similar situation. Christian has become one of the superstars in American soccer and he made his first steps in football, so it might be a little bit different to Shinji Kagawa who had made his first steps in Japan.”

PST: We’re sure the club has seen a bump in interest from American audiences. Is there a way to measure the impact he’s had, especially as BVB battles for new fans?

CC: “We are a powerful club but we are definitely not comparable with the Real Madrids and Manchester Uniteds, so they are even bigger. But we do have very very attractive door opener, who makes it easier to meet people, especially the young generation. In the young generation, football has a higher relevance. If you have one of their generation wearing a black and yellow shirt, it gives us a deeper and more intense impact than without him. We analyze the digital reach, the followers when we present to the American public.

“It’s the frosting on the cake. The cake is always delicious if it’s a black and yellow one, but if you can taste the black and yellow one including Christian Pulisic, it’s an awesome cake.”

Donnerstag 19.07.2018, 1. Fussball – Bundesliga Saison 18/19 – BVB USA-2018 Reise 2, Chicago,
Borussia Dortmund. Credit: Alexander Isak (BVB),

PST: The black and yellow of Dortmund has a bit in common with the sports teams of Pittsburgh, where you’ll play this week. Does the club have a lot of say in where they play as part of the ICC?

CC: “For us it was important when we agreed in the ICC that we play in the more Eastern parts of the states. We started with LAFC for the opening of Banc of California Stadium. Then we said we don’t want to go to the West Coast again and if it would be possible we’d love to go to Chicago because of a big German community and many many Polish people.

“Chicago was naturally seeded, than Charlotte is attractive because there are many German business there. And then they offered Pittsburgh and we said that’s cool because there’s a side of parallelism between the city history of Pittsburgh and Dortmund. Both have an industrial background like steel and coal, and Pittsburgh has the black and yellow, and is not that far from where Christian’s from in Hershey.”

PST: You have another interesting international addition in Jadon Sancho, formerly from Manchester City. Correct me if I’m wrong, but there hasn’t been a British player on Dortmund for some time and it doesn’t happen a ton in the Bundesliga. What does that say?

CC: “He’s the first one from the island we took, but he’s one of many many young players who’s fully convinced that Dortmund is the right club for his stage of their career.

“The reputation we do have is we build stars, we never buy stars. We build them, we make them, we develop them. The education of young talented players is one of the core pieces of Borussia Dortmund.”

“It was not difficult to convince Jadon. After one year of playing for us, he saw he could trust us. He’s a very talented guy and he can commit that the step to Dortmund was the right one. He’s the first one from the UK, but he was one of many Europeans who see they have an opportunity to play for the club.”

PST: This may be a goofy question, but what’s the focus of your job domestically? It doesn’t seem like a historically-big Borussia Dortmund needs to do a ton to prop itself up in Germany, so what’s critical to the marketing of BVB?

CC: “First of all, our core business is football. Marketing is just an appendix. We have a very simple job. We have to clean the window. We have to put in the window what makes people want to open the door and come into the Dortmund store. We have nice talented attractive players. The only job we have is presenting Borussia Dortmund as authentic, as credible as possible. Then marketing is very easy. Don’t tell them an artificial story. Make the players touchable, accessible. Give the people the feeling that we are really interested, that there is no big distance between the supporters and us, and you may have seen when we arrived at the public terminal at the Chicago airport. That’s our marketing. The more people we can attract, the more hearts we can gain, the more successful our marketing activities have been.”

Guingamp: 11-goal captain Briand off to Montreal

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Guingamp captain Jimmy Briand is making the move from Ligue 1 to Major League Soccer.

The French side announced that the 32-year-old, capped five times by France between 28-32, is coming to the Montreal Impact.

[ MORE: Pulisic rolls over Liverpool ]

Briand spent time with Lyon and Hannover after a eight-year stint with Rennes, where he was teammates with former USMNT captain Carlos Bocanegra.

The center forward scored 11 goals last season in France, including markers against Paris Saint-Germain and Monaco.

Briand could provide a big missing piece of Montreal’s attack. The Impact have playmakers in Ignacio Piatti and Saphir Taidir, but haven’t found much from their forwards.

Pulisic sparks BVB’s breakdown of Liverpool

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Second half substitute Christian Pulisic stole the show in Charlotte, where Borussia Dortmund toppled Liverpool 3-1 in International Champions Cup play on Sunday.

[ MORE: Mina to Everton? ]

Virgil Van Dijk had given Liverpool the lead with a first half header, but it was all BVB in the second half.

Pulisic won and converted a penalty, then scored a second before taking the shot that led to Jacob Bruun Larsen’s rebound goal.

The performance put Pulisicmania in a nutshell for the unindoctrinated, and spoiled the trip to the stadium for a bright red crowd.

Moments like this don’t hurt either:

Pulisic wins, converts penalty against Liverpool (fan video)

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USMNT star and Borussia Dortmund teenage winger Christian Pulisic won a penalty kick off James Milner, then insisted on taking the spot kick in front of his home crowd.

[ MORE: Mina to Everton? ]

Pulisic, 19, took the ball off Mario Gotze and finished his chance clinically to equalize against Liverpool, his second won penalty of the American tour.

Pulisic began the game on the bench after starting in Chicago against Manchester City, and Liverpool had gone ahead early when Virgil Van Dijk took advantage of poorly set up BVB zonal marking.

But Pulisic cut past Milner and was tripped by the veteran before clattering into Ragnar Klavan and earning the PK.