Report: Argentinian national team flew same plane as Chapecoense crash

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According to a report by Brazilian Folha de São Paulo, a flight bearing the Argentinian national team was dangerously close to crashing in the same manner that saw much of the Brazilian club team Chapecoense tragically perish just a week ago.

The report states that the national team, including Lionel Messi, Sergio Aguero, and other star players on November 11th, was traveling on its way home from the 3-0 loss to Brazil aboard the exact same plane that crashed on November 28th, and was 18 minutes from running out of fuel before landing in Buenos Aires.

The British Aerospace 146 aircraft has a maximum fuel capacity for a flight of four hours and 22 minutes, and the trip from Belo Horizonte to Buenos Aires took four hours and four minutes, according to the report citing flight logs.

Information disemminating from the November 28th crash shows the aircraft did not reach its destination due to a loss of fuel.

According to an editorial written by Airways Magazine editor in chief Enrique Perrella following the Chapecoense crash, it is a common occurrence in South America for pilots to routinely stretch the maximum flight distances for aircrafts, and to take fuel amounts dangerously close to actual flight time without much pushback.

Many flight governing bodies around the world state minimum fuel requirements to be enough fuel for flight time plus distance to an alternate landing location plus an extra 45 minutes.

The Airways editorial states, citing the flight plan for the November 28th crash, that the pilot for the plane carrying Chapecoense was also the owner of the airline, causing a blatant conflict of interest. In the hope of stretching his aircraft to save on fuel costs, he apparently registered enough fuel on his flight plan for the exact amount of flight time from Santa Cruz to Medellin – four hours and 22 minutes.

When the plane was asked to sit in a holding pattern above the airport to allow another flight with mechanical problems to land, they ran out of fuel and crashed just a few miles from the destination.

Should all this information prove to be accurate, not only was the accident clearly preventable, but it could have happened more than once, and clearly a change in culture is needed.