CONCACAF finalizing plans to replace international friendlies

Matthias Hangst/Getty Images
0 Comments

CONCACAF is aiming to mimic Europe as the federation closes in on developing a “Nations League” of its own.

[ MORE: USMNT to face Venezuela, Ghana this summer ]

FIFA vice president and CONCACAF boss Victor Montagliani has revealed to Reuters his plans to eliminate international friendlies from the North American region and effectively replace it with a competition that features all 41 nations from North and Central America as well as the Caribbean.

[ MORE: MLS Power Rankings — Week 5 ]

“There has been overwhelming acceptance that it is a great idea and the way we need to go,” Montagliani said. “There are a few formats that we have looked at, and we have had various members coming back with ideas. We have a format that we have landed on and we will show it to our members first.”

An official decision could come Saturday when CONCACAF meets in Aruba to discuss the proposed matter and other topics.

UEFA is preparing to debut its Nations League in 2018, with all European countries involved in the competition during the international windows.

While the USMNT and other big CONCACAF nations like Mexico and Costa Rica have become accustomed to facing top-quality competition during the international window, that would all change with Montagliani’s proposal.

The U.S. has previously taken on top teams like Brazil and Germany during the international break, however, the new tournament would give the Americans nontraditional sides.

“With Europe changing to the Nations League, it is going to get harder to get friendlies,” Montagliani said.

Montagliani doesn’t believe that the switch will affect CONCACAF’s big nations though, and in fact says that it could actually help the region as smaller teams develop.

“The truth of the matter is that a lot of the friendlies our nations play, including the bigger nations, are a waste of time,” Montagliani said. “Let’s be honest: A lot of them are not quality. You are better off playing a game that actually means something against an opponent, that on paper anyway, may not be as good.

“We need to develop our own competition in our region to make everybody better,” he continued. “And then you need to do it at club level as well, to raise the standards of our professional leagues and the clubs in them.

“This is the only way that our countries will get better. It’s not about playing friendlies against England.”