Ronald Koeman’s Everton future heading one way

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BRIGHTON — Like a bug knocking into a light bulb on the porch on a summers night time and time again, we know what the outcome will be. We are still watching.

Even though the bug will soon succumb to failure, they are the only ones who don’t realize it. That’s what it feels like watching Everton and Ronald Koeman at the moment.

And Sunday was a damning indictment on the team Everton have become under Ronald Koeman, even though Wayne Rooney scored an 88th minute penalty kick to grab a point after Anthony Knockaert‘s looked likely to give Brighton and Hove Albion a deserved victory.

“Sacked in the morning, you’re getting sacked in the morning!” sang the Brighton fans after they went 1-0 up.

Rooney’s late goal will save Koeman that embarrassment but he is the bookies favorite to be the next Premier League manager fired and if he doesn’t get positive results against Lyon in the Europa League and Arsenal in the PL next weekend, next Monday morning could mark the end.

The Toffees were totally devoid of any confidence throughout their trip to Brighton and Everton’s fans had little to cheer. They broke into full voice on no more than two occasions as their team of expensive individuals played like, well, a team of expensive individuals.

Much has been made of Koeman’s big summer of spending with $193 million spent on new talent, but the lack of planning with that spending is what will ultimately cost him his job as no replacement for Romelu Lukaku points to a toothless, sluggish attack.

Everton have now scored just seven goals in their last 13 matches in the Premier League, failing to score on seven occasions. They’ve had just 21 shots on target in eight games so far this season.

Like the bug, Koeman’s time is running out.

“My whole football life is pressure, if I don’t get pressure from outside I put pressure on myself,” Koeman told Sky Sports after the game.

Unshaven, and dare I say looking slightly disheveled, Koeman’s demeanor told the story on Sunday at Brighton.

Two hours before kick off and with the stadium empty, Koeman stood tentatively on the sidelines as a handful of his players surveyed the playing surface. His brother and assistant coach, Erwin, sat on the bench. They looked at each other with a glum expressions on their face. Koeman then turned and walked down the tunnel without looking up.

During the game he trudged back and forth to his seat on the bench from the technical area with, like his team, little vigor.

Toothless in attack once again, Rooney, Gylfi Sigurdsson and Dominic Calvert-Lewin rarely threatened with 20-year-old deadline day buy Nikola Vlasic the only bright spark in attack.

Koeman was handed the dreaded vote of confidence from chairman and majority owner Farhad Moshiri following the 1-0 defeat to Burnley at Goodison Park before the break.

Sunday’s performance did little to suggest that vote of confidence was well placed and, like the bug, Koeman’s time at Everton isn’t too far away from the ultimate failure.