La Liga takes Spanish FA to court over game in U.S.

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La Liga president Javier Tebas is following through on threats that he’ll take legal action to force through a league match in the U.S.

The Spanish top flight confirmed to the BBC that it had filed a lawsuit in Madrid, effectively trying to use legal means to force through an approval from the Spanish Football Federation (RFEF). “La Liga has taken a case to court in Madrid and expect a resolution in the coming days or weeks,” a league spokesperson said, via the BBC.

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After announcing a 15-year deal with U.S. based sports marketing giant Relevant Sports to promote La Liga in the U.S. and elsewhere outside of Spain, La Liga revealed its intention to play a league match outside its sovereign shores. Barcelona and Girona agreed to move the return fixture, originally set to be in Girona, to Miami on January 26.

However, both the RFEF and FIFA have announced that they won’t approve this match played outside of Spain. La Liga needs approval from the RFEF, FIFA and U.S. Soccer before it can actually stage the game, and with less than two months to go, La Liga needs a decision one way or another.

It’s a bit embarrassing that both La Liga and Relevant Sports didn’t do any politiking or sounding out the necessary federations to get approval before announcing the idea, making the league look like it lacks organization and a plan. Of course, what might work in La Liga’s favor is the upcoming Copa Libertadores Final, set to take place in Madrid on December 9. Although it was moved due to quite extraordinary circumstances, the fact that it’s set to take place outside of CONMEBOL’s jurisdiction could provide La Liga with the loophole to force a league match outside of its borders.