Rose slams UEFA, says no interest in coaching in honest racism chat

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In a lengthy interview with Sky Sports, Tottenham and England defender Danny Rose spoke up about the racist abuse he has received in his career and spoke about his future in the game – or lack thereof.

Rose most notably criticized UEFA for its punishment of Montenegro for racist chants directed towards Rose and other players when England visited for a Nations League match in March. UEFA announced Montenegro would play its next home match behind closed doors, to which Rose replied he was “at a loss for words.”

I don’t think it’s a harsh enough punishment,” Rose said. “I’m not surprised. It’s obviously a bit of a shame this is where we’re at now and I just have to get on with it,” the England left-back added. It’s a bit shocking but there’s not much I can do now. I just hope I don’t ever have to play there again and we just have to move on now.”

The ban leaves Montenegro with an empty stadium for a visit from Kosovo for Euro 2020 qualification in early June.

The 28-year-old also said he has “no interest in” earning his coaching badges, calling it a “waste of time” due to the disadvantages black coaches face.

Rose said in early April that he “can’t wait to see the back of” the sport when he retires, and while at the time those comments were taken to mean he was excited to leave his playing days behind, he expanded upon those to say he has no desire to coach as well.

“When I said I wanted to walk away from football, people think I was just talking about the two or three incidents that have happened on the pitch,” Rose said to Sky Sports. “When I said that, I was talking about the lack of black managers in football now, or working upstairs in football clubs. People ask me if I want to do my coaching badges. Why? You are not given a chance, so no, I wouldn’t be looking forward to doing my badges – it is a waste of time. That is what I meant by I am looking forward to calling it day when the time is right.”

Rose pointed at former Tottenham and Arsenal defender Sol Campbell, currently in his first managerial job as boss of League Two side Macclesfield Town, compared to other former players. “No disrespect to League Two, others are at the top end of the Championship, top end of the Premier League for their first jobs, even national teams,” Rose said. “If somebody like Sol Campbell, with his resume, who he has played for, what he has won – possibly at the time there may have been an argument that he was England’s best centre-half – if he has had to go to the bottom of League Two, which I wouldn’t mind doing, and others get to be here, why would I want to do that?”

Steven Gerrard is the most high-profile recent case of a white former player earning a top-level job in his first go, currently in charge of Scottish side Rangers.