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Mexico into Gold Cup semifinals with penalty shootout win over Costa Rica

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The game lacked flow, at times lacked quality, and certainly lacked grace, but Guillermo Ochoa produced his own brilliant signature moment when it mattered to send Mexico to the Gold Cup semifinals with a 5-4 penalty shootout victory over Costa Rica after a 1-1 draw.

A game that featured 46 fouls and 12 yellow cards was ended abruptly as Ochoa guessed correctly on Keysher Fuller’s penalty, diving down low to his right and extending his right arm fully to reach the effort and palm it away to seal victory, peeling away in jubilant celebration.

The game was choppy until just before halftime when Mexico went in front on a 41st minute turn-and-shoot from Raul Jimenez whose initial shot was stonewalled by Oscar Duarte but he stuck with it and fired Mexico in front.

Mexico’s lead wouldn’t last long after the break as Costa Rica pulled back level in the 52nd minute when Joel Campbell latched onto a long ball forward having broken between two defenders. On the charge forward, Luis Rodriguez clipped Campbell’s foot just as he went to shoot, and the referee pointed to the spot. Bryan Ruiz cooly buried his penalty with a soft poke left that saw Ochoa wrong-footed and brought Costa Rica even at 1-1.

Overall, the teams put together 37 shots but could only see 10 of them find the target. The fouling was the story of the match, and between all the cautions handed out even the coaches were given cards. Mexico was the more vicious attacking team looking to win the match in regulation, and Costa Rica goalkeeper Leonel Moreira was required to make a spectacular save in the 58th minute on a long-distance effort by Jimenez looking for his second. With just five minutes to go, Mexico again came close as they worked the ball into the box from the left flank and again Moreira was there to leap and tip a shot by Carlos Rodriguez off the crossbar and out.

Ochoa came alive in extra-time, first diving low to his left to stop a 108th minute Jonathan McDonald slicer before his penalty shootout heroics. Mexico went behind straight away as Jimenez’s poor effort was saved by Moreira on the very first penalty of the shootout. It stayed that way until at 2-2 Randall Leal ripped his spot-kick wide. That set up Ochoa for his moment with the score at 5-4 and Fuller at the spot, sending Mexico through and ripping out Costa Rica hearts.

Mexico will meet Haiti in the semifinals after the comeback victory against Canada continued Haiti’s dream run through this tournament. For Costa Rica, it becomes the third Gold Cup in their last four where they have been eliminated in the quarterfinal stage, a disappointing haul for a team with consistent World Cup aspirations.

Gold Cup: Costa Rica hammers Nicaragua; Haiti’s comeback

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A roundup of all of Sunday’s action at the 2019 Gold Cup in Costa Rica…

[ WOMEN’S WORLD CUP: USA, Sweden advance ahead of Group F finale ]

Costa Rica 4-0 Nicaragua

In the first-ever Gold Cup game played on soil outside the United States, Mexico or Canada, Costa Rica made the most of a newfound home-field advantage, to the tune of a 4-0 victory over Nicaragua as the two sides began Group B play.

Bryan Oviedo put the home side on the board with what turned out to be the winner after just seven minutes, but Celso Borges’ thunderous strike stole the headlines, for very obvious reasons.

Somehow, Borges was upstaged by a slick piece of combination play, featuring a no-look back-heel pass (Bryan Ruiz) and a curling finish (Elias Aguilar) into the upper-90.

[ COPA AMERICA: Lodeiro’s golazo paces Uruguay; Qatar, Paraguay draw ]

Haiti 2-1 Bermuda

Haiti fell 1-0 behind, then erased that deficit and went 2-1 ahead of, Bermuda all in the space of 21 minutes. Dante Leverock scored Bermuda’s first-ever Gold Cup in the second minute of first-half stoppage time, soaring above the crowd and heading home from a corner kick.

Set pieces giveth, and set pieces taketh. Haiti drew level nine minutes into the second half, courtesy of Frantzdy Pierrot’s header from a dangerous free kick. Pierrot poked home a wide open rebound to bag his second of the game in the 66th minute.

Monday’s Gold Cup schedule

Curacao v. El Salvador — 7 p.m. ET
Jamaica v. Honduras — 9:30 p.m. ET

Bizarre must-see penalty levels Costa Rica, Switzerland

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A wild finish in Nizhny Novgorod saw Costa Rica come back to draw Switzerland 2-2, though the Swiss are the second-place side to move into the Round of 16.

Switzerland led through ex-Montreal Impact midfielder Blerim Dzemaili and later Josip Drmic, but Vancouver Whitecaps defender Kendall Waston and ex-Fulham man Bryan Ruiz found equalizers.

Ruiz’s goal was especially wild, his PK bounding off the bar but hitting the Swiss goalkeeper for what will absurdly be recorded as an own goal.

[ MORE: Latest 2018 World Cup news ] 

Dzemaili’s goal came when Breel Embolo leapt to knock down Stephan Lichtsteiner’s cross back toward the top of the six.

The knockdown could hardly have found Dzemaili in a more favorable position.

Click here for live and on demand coverage of the World Cup online and via the NBC Sports App.

It was Whitecaps stalwart Waston who restored the deadlock off a 56th minute set piece.

MLS defenses have seen this before…

[ LIVE: World Cup scores ]  

Switzerland went ahead through Drmic, and then almost gave the lead right back. A penalty was awarded to Costa Rica’s Bryan Ruiz, but the ex-Fulham man was found offside via VAR.

No matter, Costa Rica got its penalty late, and converted it in… unusual fashion. Joel Campbell’s effort won the PK, and Ruiz’s shot hit the bar, then Swiss goalkeeper Jan Sommer’s head to make it 2-2.

Vanney, Morgan, Pulisic earn major CONCACAF Awards

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CONCACAF announced its Male and Female Players of the Year on Monday — Keylor Navas and Alex Morgan — and rolled out the rest of their honors a day later.

Toronto FC coach Greg Vanney was named Male Coach of the Year for the confederation on Tuesday, while Christian Pulisic restored an American male to the CONCACAF Best XI after a year with no winner.

Portland Thorns backstop Adrianna Franch nipped countrywoman Ashlyn Harris (Orlando Pride) to the CONCACAF Female Goalkeeper of the Year.

[ REPORT: Chelsea, Arsenal, United chase Zaha ]

Pulisic slides into a 3-4-3 with Navas, Cristian Gamboa, Hector Moreno, Kendall Waston, Roman Torres, Bryan Ruiz, Hector Herrera, Wilde-Donald Guerrier, Hirving Lozano, and Alberth Elis.

Waston, Torres, and Elis play in MLS.

The Female Best XI was predictable USWNT-heavy, with Marta and Jessie Fleming the only foreign players in the team. The U.S. players are: Franch, Abby Dahlkemper, Ali Krieger, Becky Sauerbrunn, Emily Menges, Allie Long, Carli Lloyd, Lindsay Horan, and Morgan.

Is USMNT’s biggest World Cup obstacle between its ears?

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Picture this, and forgive yourself if it’s a bit too easy: The United States men’s national team seizes control of its World Cup destiny with a decisive home win Friday against Panama, then needs very little from Trinidad and Tobago on Tuesday.

That second match sees the Yanks off to a slow start at Ato Boldon Stadium, a defensive fluke sending them down early en route to a wild and entertaining ending, failing to find more than an equalizer once they snap out of their funk and get to playing their game.

[ MORE: Three keys vs. Panama ]

If you were to ask me my No. 1 concern for this week’s monumental World Cup qualifiers, the ones that stand between the Americans and their hopes for a eighth-straight World Cup appearance, that’s it: Entitlement.

I’m not sure when the mentality of the USMNT went from upstart grinders to presumed favorites, but it may have happened some time in the intense scrutiny of the Jurgen Klinsmann era. We have to wonder if, under any other coach, advancing from a group with Germany, Portugal, and Ghana would’ve been viewed as anything other than an unqualified success.

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Klinsmann earned himself the opportunity to be rightly fired when his inconsistent teams looked either ill-prepared tactically or poorly-chosen toward the end of his tenure. The Mexico loss at home was disappointing, and the team looked like it hadn’t grasped what happened when it rolled into Costa Rica and got its guts kicked in by Los Ticos a few days later.

The choice of Bruce Arena as next man up was questionable in terms of ambition and scope, but would almost certainly settle the team. And it did. Though the performances were largely less than impressive, the Yanks didn’t lose for the better part of a pregnancy.

[ MORE: Who should start for USA v Panama? ]

But there were labor pains along the way, performances that raised eyebrows. For every tactically strong 1-1 draw in Mexico, there was the Gold Cup group-stage opening draw with Panama. For every 6-0 waxing of Honduras, there’s a self-satisfied 3-2 sleepwalker versus Martinique. And you could argue it birthed September’s home loss to Costa Rica and draw at Honduras.

Sure there are natural ebbs and flows to every team, but you need look no further than the top teams on the Hex table to see there are two gulfs of difference. In Mexico, there’s a top-to-bottom depth the Americans do not have, but in Costa Rica the troubles are, well, more troubling.

You cannot look at the Costa Rican squad and have much question that the best players are being called up, nor that they aren’t over-performing. Los Ticos did this at the last World Cup, and are doing it again despite changing coaches.

[ MORE: World Cup scenarios for USA ]

With incredible respect to Keylor Navas, Bryan Ruiz, Bryan Oviedo, and Marco Urena, they aren’t touching the Yanks’ corps. And that’s what makes it all the more problematic. The U.S. won the Gold Cup with a B Team, but maybe would’ve been better suited to keep more main men in the fold to grow in cohesion ahead of September.

At the risk of turning this into a gripe fest, which would be wrong when I genuinely believe the Yanks should run riot on Friday and then bear down in T&T for another win, it stings to stand not too far from a cliff that would cost Christian Pulisic, Bobby Wood, and Kellyn Acosta their first World Cups, and DeAndre Yedlin and John Brooks their second.

Brooks and Fabian Johnson (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)
The average age of this week’s squad is 28. It’s good enough to get two wins, especially with clear-cut, no-doubt starters like Geoff Cameron, Christian Pulisic, Jozy Altidore, and Bobby Wood. Michael Bradley and Tim Howard likely fit that bill, too. So does Fabian Johnson, but that’s another story since he’s not up to snuff according to Arena.

The legendary coach penned an open letter to fans on Tuesday, and in it he hit on some of the talking points which have started to ring quite tiresome. CONCACAF is really hard. That other guy lost the first two games. We almost didn’t qualify before. So on, and so on.

[ MORE: Some roster gripes for Mr. Arena ]

Well, it’s 2017, and it shouldn’t matter if the other teams are a bit better because of Major League Soccer. So are your guys. The resources of U.S. Soccer, the laughably forgiving nature of CONCACAF qualifying, and the talent available dictate that the USMNT should walk to every single World Cup if it’s doing its job in an average fashion.

The U.S. is 2-3-3 in the Hex, snaring about 38 percent of available points. If it advanced with a win and draw or two wins, it will have headed to Russia with either 43 or 50 percent of possible points. Only a handful of nations are on pace to get to the World Cup with around half a points haul.

Even getting past the doubts that Arena is going to see past his tried and hopefully true philosophies and line up a team that doesn’t seem aimed at trolling his critics by becoming, as a friend put it, so anti-Klinsmann that it’s strikingly similar to Klinsmann, the Americans have the talent to pull this off and head to Russia.

Yet for the first time in a long time, it’s not skill, or tactics, or technique that I’m worried about when it comes to what could fell the USMNT; It’s mentality. And at this point, I’d rather have the crew of guys who thought they’d have to win despite their coach than the ones who feel comfortable with their boss.

The Yanks’ A Team hasn’t played well throughout consecutive matches in some time, probably going beyond Arena’s tenure and deep into Klinsmann’s (group stage of Copa America? The 2015 friendly wins in Germany and Holland?).

This week becoming a chance to try out young kids in serious competition was out of the window with September’s results, if not the opening losses to Mexico and Costa Rica. Underperforming on Friday and Tuesday could close down Arena’s chances of meaningful experimentation in November friendlies because of an unnecessary international playoff (or worse).

Maybe it’s as simple as flipping a switch. Maybe I’m overemphasizing minor mental flaws that will be systematically overrun by the magnitude of this week. I hope either of those are correct, but for the first time in ages my anxiety goes beyond skill set. And that’s nerve-wracking stuff.