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Arsenal vs Tottenham player ratings

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LONDON — Emerson’s straight red in the 62nd minute took much of the suspense out of what had been another nervy north London derby, as a rattled Tottenham never seriously threatened over the final half-hour in a 3-1 defeat to Arsenal at the Emirates.

North London is red. For now.

[ MORE: Recap, analysis, reaction on Arsenal’s big win ]

Thomas Partey’s return from a knee injury sustained during international duty proved crucial for Mikel Arteta’s men, with the Ghanian opening the scoring in the first half and allowing the Gunners to largely control things in midfield.

Spurs were compact and resilient as always, but counter-attacking opportunities were difficult to come by and Antonio Conte was short on answers once his team went down to 10 men.

Below are the Arsenal vs Tottenham player ratings out of 10, with analysis on each player who took part.


Arsenal player ratings

Aaron Ramsdale: 6 – Hardly tested in the second half but was played on Harry Kane’s down-the-middle penalty attempt and never seemed fully confident or comfortable. Distribution was solid.

Ben White: 7 – Arteta’s tactical switch after half allowed him to create several chances on dangerous overlapping runs, particularly with Saka. Tallied one assist and could easily have had one more.

Gabriel Magalhaes: 5 – Rash challenge in the box when he seemed to have the time to avoid going to ground set up Kane’s equalizing penalty, though he does deserve credit for bouncing back afterward.

William Saliba: 7.5 – Remained calm and composed at the back for the most part, including closing down Son and Richarlison in the box at different points. Won the ball back time and time again.

Oleksandr Zinchenko: 7 – Typically technical performance as he feels his way back from injury. His metronomic passing helps the Gunners control the speed of the game and he proved his importance.

Granit Xhaka: 8 – You’d have a compelling case for either he or Partey to be man of the match, as one half of Arsenal’s dominant midfield duo was relentless generating chances and finally grabbed the Gunners an insurance goal in the 67th, but he found himself out of position on occasion in the opening 45.

Thomas Partey: 8.5 – Once again proved to be the lynchpin for Arsenal on both ends, with both his opening goal and his pressing play showing just how crucial his fitness will be moving forward.

Gabriel Martinelli: 7 – Drew the decisive red from Emerson and generally wreaked havoc with individual runs throughout the day.

Martin Odegaard: 6 – A surprisingly quiet day from Arsenal’s captain, who always seemed a step away from finding himself on the ball in dangerous areas.

Bukayo Saka: 7 – Spent most of the early going isolated against multiple defenders, but exhibited an impressive work rate and drew plenty of attention. Great work for the second goal.

Gabriel Jesus: 7.5 – Relatively quiet in the first 45 but Spurs didn’t have an answer after half, deserved his goal and had several other quality chances that went begging.

Substitutes
Albert Sambi Lokonga (73′ on for Partey): 6 – Showed real, encouraging panache against a Spurs side down to 10 men.
Kieran Tierney (73′ on for Zinchenko): 6 – Probed well as an inverted fullback after coming on to give the still-recovering Zinchenko deserved rest.
Fabio Vieira (80’ on for Odegaard): N/A
Eddie Nketiah (80’ on for Jesus): N/A
Takehiro Tomiyasu (89’ on for White): N/A


Tottenham player ratings

Hugo Lloris: 4.5 – Uncharacteristically sloppy with his passing and canceled out a couple nice saves with a poor effort on Arsenal’s second goal.

Cristian Romero: 5 – Didn’t cover himself in glory on that second goal either, and he seemed to narrowly avoid a booking multiple times, but he did kickstart multiple counterattacks.

Eric Dier: 5.5 – Played well and marked Jesus capably in the first half, but came a bit undone after Emerson’s red card like the rest of his club.

Clement Lenglet: 6 – Consistently stuck to Saka despite struggling with his trickery and sparked a couple of productive counters. Solid enough.

Ivan Perisic: 5.5 – Found room down the left-hand side several times during the first half but got caught out a bit in the second 45.

Pierre-Emile Hojbjerg: 6 – Had a thankless task once Spurs went down to 10 men but had some nice moments handling Arsenal in midfield, stepping into tackles and producing changes of possession.

Rodrigo Bentancur: 6.5 – Felt like the best Spurs player on the pitch, never panicking despite Tottenham being outnumbered in central midfield and starting several attacks.

Richarlison: 6 – Disappeared at times, as is his wont, but acquitted himself well enough digging in to help in defense and (as also is his wont) generating great runs seemingly out of nowhere, including on the drawn penalty.

Harry Kane: 6.5 – A classic Kane performance even in defeat, from the penalty goal to his ability to never lose his cool and find ways to take the pressure off his side in a hostile environment.

Heung-min Son: 6 – There were flashes of the Son we’ve grown to know, a first touch here or a dribble there, but the link-up play always seemed to go awry in some small way.

Substitutes
Yves Bissouma (71′ on for Perisic): 5 – Part of Conte’s group substitution that was mostly there to see out the defeat.
Davinson Sanchez (’71 on for Lenglet): 5 – see above
Matt Doherty (72′ on for Son): 4 – Some much-needed match time, although some nervy moments in there.
Ryan Sessegnon (’71 on for Richarlison) 5 – Conte opted for damage control down to 10 men, turning Sessegnon from a wing-back to part of a back-five.
Oliver Skipp (75′ on for Hojbjerg) 5 – Encouraging off the ball, discouraging on it, to be expected for a rusty player.

NWSL Commissioner Baird resigns amid scandal

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National Women’s Soccer League Commissioner Lisa Baird resigned after some 19 months on the job amid allegations that a former coach engaged in sexual harassment and misconduct.

Baird’s resignation was announced by the league late Friday, a day after The Athletic published the accounts of two former players who claimed misconduct, including sexual coercion, by North Carolina coach Paul Riley.

Riley was fired by the Courage on Thursday and the allegations touched off a wave of condemnation by players that forced this weekend’s games to be called off.

Additionally, FIFA on Friday opened an investigation into the case. It is rare that soccer’s international governing body gets involved in a controversy involving a member association. U.S. Soccer also announced an independent investigation on Friday.

U.S. Soccer was instrumental in founding the NWSL in 2013 and helped support the league until last year, when it became independent. The federation continues its financial support of the league.

“Player safety and respect is the paramount responsibility of every person involved in this game. That is true across every age, competition and ability level,” U.S. Soccer President Cindy Cone said in a statement. “We owe it to each athlete, each fan and the entire soccer community to take every meaningful action in our power to ensure nothing like this ever happens again.”

U.S. Soccer suspended Riley’s coaching license Thursday after The Athletic published claims of abuse made by former NWSL players Sinead Farrelly and Mana Shim.

FIFA told The Associated Press it was “deeply concerned” by the case and will now be seeking further details from American soccer authorities about the issues raised.

“Due to the severity and seriousness of the allegations being made by players, we can confirm that FIFA’s judicial bodies are actively looking into the matter and have opened a preliminary investigation,” FIFA said in a statement to the AP. “As part of this, FIFA will be reaching out to the respective parties, including US Soccer and NWSL, for further information about the various safeguarding concerns and allegations of abuse that have been raised.”

The alleged harassment of Farrelly started in 2011 when she was a player with the Philadelphia Independence of the now-defunct Women’s Professional Soccer league.

She told the website the harassment continued when Farrelly was with the Portland Thorns. Shim, a former Thorns player, also allegedly experienced harassment. The Thorns said Thursday that the team investigated claims about Riley and passed those on to the league when he was dismissed.

Riley told The Athletic the allegations were “completely untrue.”

Outcry over the allegations rocked the league and forced this weekend’s games to be called off. The NWSL Players’ Association said it hoped fans would understand and support the decision.

“It is OK to take space to process, to feel and to take care of yourself,” the union said. “In fact, it’s more than OK, it’s a priority. That, as players, will be our focus this weekend.”

Baird became commissioner of the NWSL in February, 2020, after serving as chief marketing officer of the United States Olympic Committee. She was praised for brining new sponsors to the NWSL and increasing the league’s visibility on the national stage.

OL Reign midfielder Jess Fishlock, who has been playing in the NWSL since its inception in 2013, suggested the league, and women’s sports overall, are in the midst of a reckoning.

“I think women athletes specifically have gone through so much over the years, not just women’s football,” Fishlock said. “I think everybody knows what’s happened with USA Gymnastics that has gone on, and this is something that has been happening in women’s sports over and over and over again for years and years and years. And we’ve never felt safe enough to talk about it, and if we ever felt brave enough to talk about it, then it would just get swept under the rug, or we were told that we were in the wrong … and I think we’re at a point now where we’re just done.”

Riley was head coach of the Thorns in 2014 and 2015. After he was let go by the Thorns, he became head coach of the Western New York Flash for a season before the team was sold and moved to North Carolina.

In its ninth season, the NWSL has been rocked by a series of recent scandals involving team officials.

Washington Spirit coach Richie Burke was fired after a Washington Post report detailed verbal and emotional abuse of players. The league formally dismissed Burke and sanctioned the Spirit on Tuesday after an independent investigation.

Gotham FC general manager Alyse LaHue was fired in July after an investigation connected to the league’s antiharassment policy. She has denied any wrongdoing.

Racing Louisville coach Christy Holly was fired in September but the reasons for his dismissal were not made public.

OL Reign coach Farid Benstiti abruptly resigned in July. On Friday, OL Reign chief executive officer and minority owner Bill Predmore said Benstiti was asked to step down after an undisclosed incident during practice.

Benstiti had previously been accused by U.S. national team midfielder Lindsay Horan of sexist behavior during his time as coach of Paris Saint-Germain. Horan has said she was berated by Benstiti because of her weight.