2026 FIFA World Cup

Here’s how all nations voted in 2026 World Cup process

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In an effort to become more transparent, FIFA made it mandatory that nations make their votes clear during the voting process for the 2026 World Cup.

[ MORE: United bid wins right to host 2026 World Cup ]

The United Bid — comprised of the U.S., Canada and Mexico — took home an overwhelming victory on Wednesday, but let’s take a closer look at how they did so.

In all, 134 nations voted in favor of the North American bid, while 65 countries gave Morocco their votes.

Three more nations (Cuba, Spain and Slovenia) abstained from voting, while Iran was the only country to not vote in favor of either bid.

Among the biggest surprises to vote against the United Bid was Brazil, who is a member of CONMEBOL. The five-time World Cup champions were the only South American nation to not vote in favor of the North American contingent.

Meanwhile, France, Italy and Holland also voted in favor of Morocco.

USMNT, United Bid receive major lift with 2026 World Cup approval

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Hosting a World Cup is a spectacle unlike any other, and in two cycles, the world’s biggest competition will return to North America following Wednesday’s vote.

[ MORE: Spain fires Lopetegul two days before first WC match ]

With the decision to hand the United Bid — comprised of the Canada, Mexico and United States football federations — the rights to the 2026 edition of the World Cup, it gives those in the western quadrant of the world something significant to look forward to for the future.

Mexico will once again enjoy itself this summer, as the 2018 tournament prepares to kick off on Thursday, but there has been a bitter taste in many Americans’ mouths since the U.S. Men’s National Team’s failure in the build up to Russia.

By no means does the award of 2026 take away that grief, nor should it, but what the positive vote does offer the U.S. and its North American mates is an exciting beginning to a new era.

And it’s one that the three CONCACAF nations can say they historically took part in.

2026 ushers in the start of the 48-team World Cup, which gives teams from North America an enhanced opportunity of qualifying for the competition.

Instead of three automatic places in the tournament, six will be given by that time. Meanwhile, it is expected that another spot will be up for grabs in the form of a playoff.

While the U.S. and Mexico have become World Cup mainstays throughout the tournament’s past, this is particularly pertinent for Canada — who has appeared in just one World Cup (1986).

For years, North America has looked at avenues to grow its game, and while some may argue that a 48-team competition will dilute the World Cup field, for CONCACAF and the rest of the World Cup it opens up a brand-new opportunity for teams that have previously been left at the alter.

From an American perspective, it’s selfish but after the struggles in the lead up to 2018 it’s nice knowing that the USMNT will be guaranteed a spot in its own tournament.

Joking aside though, the U.S. has a track record of putting on quality events, whether that be the 1994 World Cup, the Olympic Games and beyond.

Not to mention the 2026 World Cup will coincide with the 250-year anniversary of the U.S.’ independence.

As nice as it is to travel and experience new countries, having the tournament come to our own backyard is a chance that simply cannot be missed, especially considering it will be held in three separate countries for the first time in the history of the World Cup.

The wounds of 2018 may still sting for the U.S., but for today at least, the Yanks, El Tri and The Canucks have won in the biggest way possible.

United bid ahead of Morocco following FIFA inspection

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For now, the United bid — which has combined forced between the United States, Mexico and Canada — is in a good position heading into the voting process to host the 2026 World Cup.

[ MORE: Youthful USMNT prepares to face Ireland ]

On Friday, the North American joint-bid outscored Morocco following FIFA’s inspection, with an overall 4 out of 5 score. Morocco’s score totaled a 2.7 out of 5.

Morocco received a “high risk” score in three major areas; stadium locations, accommodation and accommodation combined with transportation.

Meanwhile, the United bid failed to receive a single “high risk” score in the FIFA-conducted tests.

The next step in the World Cup voting process will come on June 10, when FIFA has to approve both bids before heading into June 13 voting — which will decide which host receives the honors.

FIFA subjects 2026 Morocco World Cup bid to fresh scrutiny

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Morocco’s World Cup bid is facing fresh scrutiny this week with the arrival of another delegation from FIFA after an initial task force found deficiencies in the proposals for the 2026 tournament.

In a downbeat conclusion to the visit by the FIFA inspectors last week, Morocco’s bid leader acknowledged it had to improve the quality of the submission made to FIFA in March because inadequacies were identified by football’s governing body.

[ MORE: UCL semifinals predictions ]

The previously unplanned second inspection of Morocco is an indication of the more rigorous process introduced by FIFA following criticism in 2010 that World Cups were awarded to the riskiest nations in 2018 (Russia) and 2022 (Qatar).

There will also be closer scrutiny of human rights of the bidders before the vote on June 13 when Morocco is currently due to be taking on a joint challenge from the United States, Canada and Mexico.

The Associated Press revealed last week Morocco did not declare its anti-LGBT law to FIFA in the human rights risk assessment included in the bid book. The documents – along with the North American submission – will now be scrutinized for any gaps by human rights experts.

“That process involves an expert third-party assessment of the robustness of the human rights content of both bids that will directly inform the administration’s own evaluation,” Rachel Davis, who sits on FIFA’s human rights advisory board, told the AP.

“We are confident that the process will result in a fair assessment of the human rights situation in all four countries involved in the bids, and a roadmap for how to deal with any deficiencies that FIFA will then require the successful bidder to commit to.”

Davis, who is managing director of the Shift human rights organization, said an evaluation of the human rights in the bidding nations will be included in a report to the FIFA Council, which will also assess the verdict of the evaluation task force. A bid with low scores can be blocked by the council from advancing to a vote of up to 207 football nations at the FIFA Congress on June 13.

While Morocco has said it needs to spend almost $16 billion on infrastructure for the 48-team World Cup, including building or renovating all 14 stadiums, North American does not require any tournament-specific building work. Morocco bid president Moulay Hafid Elalamy said at the end of the FIFA inspection that officials “made some remarks on the conditions of some of the stadiums.”

The new batch of technical staff being deployed from FIFA HQ to Morocco did not make a similar follow-up visit to North America after the task force inspected the rival bid’s facilities this month.

“Following the visit of the 2026 bid evaluation task force to Morocco last week, it was decided to have an additional working visit this week to complement the initial analysis of the task force and clarify some aspects of the bid,” FIFA told the AP.

Rob Harris is at http://www.twitter.com/RobHarris and http://www.facebook.com/RobHarrisReports

More AP World Cup coverage: http://www.apnews.com/tag/WorldCup

Blatter: North American bid ‘afraid’ to lose 2026 World Cup

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ZURICH (AP) The North American bid to host the 2026 World Cup now seems “afraid” of losing to Morocco, former FIFA president Sepp Blatter said Thursday.

A change in strategy this week gave the leaders of the American, Canadian and Mexican soccer federations equal status in a bid that has been heavily favored to win the hosting rights on June 13 in Moscow. The reshuffle reduced the role of previous bid chairman Sunil Gulati, the most senior American in FIFA who served on the soccer body’s executive committee under Blatter.

[READ: Tottenham crumble on cusp of glory]

“They give the impression that they are not any longer very sure that they will win, that’s my impression,” Blatter said. “But I don’t know why they are afraid.”

Last month, Blatter wrote on Twitter that Morocco was the “logical host” of the 2026 tournament. FIFA preferred single-nation World Cup hosts under Blatter’s leadership.

Still, Blatter declined to fully endorse Morocco’s ability to host a 48-team tournament alone. The 2026 edition will have the 16 extra teams wanted by Blatter successor Gianni Infantino, who supports multi-nation bids.

“I don’t know if the Moroccans are able to organize a World Cup of 48,” Blatter told invited reporters at a briefing in Zurich related to his own legal issues.

Both bids will formally submit plans next week. A FIFA-appointed panel will then evaluate the candidates and publicly score them for potential organizational and commercial risks.

Two days ahead of his 82nd birthday, Blatter said he was “a happy man.” He is still seeking to challenge a six-year ban from soccer for unethical conduct, a punishment that followed Swiss federal prosecutors opening criminal proceedings against him in September 2015. He has yet to be charged.

The Swiss official has long blamed an executive committee vote in December 2010 that picked Russia and Qatar as future World Cup hosts for sparking American and Swiss federal investigations of FIFA officials that ultimately forced him from office.

Though Blatter says he voted for the United States bid that lost to Qatar for the 2022 hosting rights, he said that doesn’t mean the country deserves to get the 2026 edition.

“I was in favor of the U.S. for 2022. To say now they must have 2026 …,” he said, pausing to add: “History will show if it’s right or wrong.”

Blatter acknowledged he once thought the 2026 contest was “a decision that was taken” in favor of North America.

Last May, the three co-hosts pushed FIFA to give them preferential status before Morocco joined the contest by an August deadline with little bid structure in place.

Blatter said the U.S. team’s failure to qualify for this year’s World Cup – which led to Gulati not seeking re-election as soccer federation president – complicated the leadership issue. The bid calls for the United States to host 60 of 80 games in 2026, with Canada and Mexico hosting 10 each.

“They have put all the three together in order to show that it is a combined organization. They should have taken the decision at that time (of the World Cup exit),” Blatter said. “The USA is big and the decisions are not always easy to understand.”