2030 World Cup

Getty Images

Report: FA to consider rebranding to EFA for better public image

Leave a comment

“Which delegation are you from?” “Where’s from the FA.” “Which FA?”

This was a common refrain at FIFA and global soccer meetings between executives with the FA and those from foreign associations. It’s gotten to a point that according to a report in The Guardian, the FA are looking to rebrand as the English FA in order to sever any negative connection with the name and what it stands for.

[READ: Pulisic could miss a month with injury]

“I think we are perceived as arrogant,” outgoing FA CEO Martin Glenn said in 2015. “I don’t think we necessarily are but perceptions … it does matter. We go to international conventions and say: ‘Hi, I’m Martin Glenn and I am from the FA.’ Which one? Obviously the English, because we invented it. Every other is the German association, the French association, we are so assumptive. Changing the name would possibly be a solution.”

Organizations across the globe commonly rebrand to avoid connections with a previous poor reputation, or to distance themselves from poor decisions made by previous leaders of the group. In this case, it only makes sense for the FA to identify itself as being from England to seamlessly fit in with the rest of world soccer’s federations.

According to the report, it would not change the name of the FA Cup or FA Council, but would instead be more focused on improving England’s image abroad. In addition, the rebrand, which is being considered by the FA board of directors, comes ahead of a possible bid for the 2030 World Cup. England would need a majority of the world’s FAs to confirm it, ahead of rival bids from South America (Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay, Chile), Eastern Europe (Romania, Greece, Bulgaria, Serbia) and Morocco.

Chile joins South American bid for 2030 World Cup

Getty Images
Leave a comment

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) Chile has joined a coalition of South American countries planning to bid for the 2030 World Cup.

The head of South American soccer body CONMEBOL announced the decision Wednesday after meeting in Buenos Aires with presidents of the four nations, which also includes Argentina, Uruguay and Paraguay.

CONMEBOL President Alejandro Dominguez said on Twitter: “We confirm the agreement between the four countries to keep working on the strategy for FIFA to award us joint organization of the 2030 World Cup.”

Argentina and Uruguay, the country that hosted and won the first World Cup in 1930, initially planned to bid for the 2030 tournament together before Paraguay was added later.

Chilean President Sebastian Pinera said in February his country would join the group.

2030 World Cup bidding heats up with joint bids

AP Photo/Luis Hidalgo
Leave a comment

A World Cup across the southern half of South America is very much in the cards, according to multiple reports.

Chile has joined Uruguay, Paraguay and Argentina in the bid to host the 2030 tournament.

[ MORE: McKennie, Adams star in Germany ]

Once 2030 hits, the World Cup will not have been hosted in South America since 2014 (three World Cups) and Europe since 2018 (two).

Here’s what Chilean president Sebastian Pinera said in a Friday Tweet.

“A few months ago I proposed to the presidents of Argentina, Uruguay and Paraguay to incorporate Chile, and jointly, to apply for 2030. They agreed to present their joint candidacy to organise the 2030 World Cup.”

Joint bids look to be the way of the future, with Canada, Mexico, and the United States hosting in 2026 and partners potentially joining Qatar in 2022. South Korea and Japan co-hosted the 2002 World Cup.

Bulgaria, Greece, Romania, and Serbia are considering a combined bid for the 2030 tournament, with England, Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland, and the Republic of Ireland also in play.

An expanded field would mean given each of the hosts a place in the tournament wouldn’t be as detrimental to qualifying (though it would make for a bizarre CONMEBOL qualifying field should all three South American teams host).

Britain, Ireland to discuss 2030 World Cup bid

AP
Leave a comment

A meeting between the football associations of England, Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland will occur after the UEFA congress in Rome on Friday, with the main aim being to put together a bid to host the 2030 World Cup.

Hosting the 2030 World Cup just in Britain had previously been the aim, but support is growing to include both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland in the bid.

The main aim of this meeting is to select 16 potential venues for the tournament, which will see 48 teams compete as the larger format will start from the 2026 World Cup in the U.S., Mexico and Canada.

This kind of World Cup bid is the future for the competition. With the tournament growing in terms of the number of teams competing, larger nations, or joint hosts, are needed to cope with the huge amounts of fans attending the events.

In this situation, spreading the World Cup across the UK and Ireland makes perfect sense as all of the host cities would be within a 90 minute flight of one another. The train system in the UK would mean the longest trip would probably be from London to Glasgow, which can be done in around four hours.

With EURO 2020 being spread across Europe, it will be intriguing to see if this model will be used for future World Cups so that entire countries do not carry the whole burden of having to build new stadiums and infrastructure to cope with hosting it.

Even in England it is believed the likes of Anfield, Old Trafford and Tottenham’s new stadium at White Hart Lane would need upgrades to reach certain standards FIFA require in terms of media facilities, having a certain distance around the pitch between fans and players and things of that nature.

Spain wants 2030 World Cup bid with Morocco and Portugal

Getty Images
1 Comment

MADRID (AP) Spain wants Morocco to join a three-country bid with Portugal to host the 2030 World Cup.

A government spokeswoman says Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez conveyed the offer to Moroccan counterpart Saad Eddine El Othmani during a brief visit to the north African country. The spokeswoman, as is custom, spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity.

There was no immediate response from the government in Rabat.

According to Spanish media, a World Cup bid spanning two continents had been floated in September when Sanchez met in Madrid with FIFA President Gianni Infantino.

South American soccer leaders are already promoting a three-way centenary bid by Uruguay, Argentina and Paraguay. Uruguay hosted the first World Cup in 1930. There is already European interest from England, which is exploring bidding with its neighbors.

Spain hosted the 1982 World Cup and bid with Portugal for the 2018 competition, which went to Russia.

More AP soccer: https://apnews.com/apf-Soccer and https://twitter.com/AP-Sports