Alessandro Matri

Done Deal: Transfer activity from August 30

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Every day between now and the end of the European transfer window, we’ll detail every remarkable signing in our Done Deal report. On Friday, we saw a spike of activity, with major deals seeing affecting players across in each of Europe’s five biggest leagues:

ENGLAND

Cardiff City – The Bluebirds pulled the trigger on a move for Nacional of Uruguay’s Maximiliano Amondarain, a 20-year-old defender who has appeared for his country at U-20 level. He moves on a four-year deal.

Southampton – 30-year-old midfielder Dean Hammond, not expected to have much of an impact on Mauricio Pochettino’s team, has been loaned to Championship side Leicester City.

Tottenham Hotspur – The long-rumored move of Steaua Bucharest’s Vlad Chiriches was finally finalized on Friday. The 23-year-old Romanian international will give André Villas-Boas some much-needed depth in the middle. Christian Erikson and Erik Lamela’s transfers were also finalized, putting Spurs’ summer spending at €118 million in transfer fees alone. I sure hope they find a way to offset that cost.

GERMANY

Augsburg – The Bavarians secured the season-long loan of Arkadiusz Milik, a 19-year-old Polish striker from Bayer Leverkusen.

Bayer Leverkusen – Out with one striker, in with another, as Bayer’s taken on big Eren Derdiyok, the Swiss international returning on loan to the club he left a season ago. The striker had moves to Hoffenheim.

Schalke – Kevin Prince Boateng, two days after scoring twice to help Milan qualify for Champions League, has moved to Germany, in the process calling the Bundesliga the best league in the world. The fee was undisclosed.

Stuttgart – In another surprise move, Stuttgart sold their captain, Serdar Tasci, to Dinamo Moscow in Russia. Again, the fee was undisclosed.

ITALY

Milan – The Rossoneri have added veteran striker Alessandro Matri from Juventus, paying €11 million to take on a player who’d been squeezed out by the Bianconeri’s summer dealings.

FRANCE

Monaco – Another huge purchase for the newly-promoted club sees sought-after midfielder Geoffrey Kondogbia move from Sevilla, signing a five-year deal after Monaco hit his €20 million release clause.

Matri goal leaves Inter searching for silver linings after Derby loss

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As Inter Milan slipped to sixth in Italy’s Serie A you could already imagine the tick, tick of the volume dial on the Andrea Stramaccioni debate. We’re at the point where any negative result will stoke some embers under the 37-year-old boss, though after today’s 2-1 loss to Juventus at the San Siro, the positives should be noted in any fair evaluation of the Inter boss. Hopefully, the debate about the young Stramaccioni’s quality can saty in stasis for a few more days.

The Nerazzurri fell behind early in today’s Derby d’Italia only to equalize early in the 54th minute through Rodrigo Palacio, just deserts for the effort given after the opening goal. But six minutes later, a breakdown allowed Juve to move through the middle of Inter’s defense, with the effort of Fabio Quagliarella rescuing a ball from touch and finding Alessandro Matri at the near post. Adding an assist to his opening goal, Quagliarella allowed Matri to beat Andrea Ranocchia and hammer the winner past a helpless Samir Handanovic.

It was Juventus playing to type. Over the course of 90 minutes, the only thing that separated their opponents was a few pieces of execution, most noticeably on the second goal. The sides were basically even in shots on goal (6-5, Inter) and possession (50-50), but after going ahead on the hour, Juventus locked down the match. Their win temporarily puts them 12 points clear at the top of Serie A, and with Bayern Munich visiting Turin on Tuesday, you can’t blame Bianconeri supporters for further indulging dreams of European glory.

But in Juventus’s need to show their first place form was a testament to Inter’s burgeoning. Though the Nerazzurri seemed to be slipping earlier this month, that now appears to be more of a phase than a pattern. Still hold a match-in-hand over Lazio and Fiorentina (the two teams above them in the standings), Inter have reason for hope.

Under normal circumstances Inter’s Saturday effort would have cashed in on that hope, but against a team used to stretching the smallest of margins into three-point chasms, Inter were left empty-handed. But that state shouldn’t overshadow the performance Stramaccioni was able to get out of his team, just as Inter’s elimination from Europa League shouldn’t make people forget they embarrassed Tottenham over 90 minutes two weeks ago. If Inter can carry that momentum forward, they may yet challenge for a Champions League spot.

Stramaccioni’s results need to improve, but after two good performances against quality opposition, now is not the time to fuel an inquest. Instead, it would be better to look at what Inter’s done well and ask whether that can be carried forward to Wednesday’s match at Sampdoria.

Highlights: Matri, Quagliarella goals lead Juventus past Celtic

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Two intriguing goals, compelling in vastly different ways, were the difference between Juventus and Celtic on Wednesday. Both cases serve as example of why Juventus’s exquisite execution make them threads to beat anybody.

The first goal was made by Federico Peluso, Juve’s left wing back who caught Celtic’s Gary Hooper on the ball. Turnovers like that are common in world soccer, but the execution that followed is not. Juventus showed the kind of speed and urgency that would break better teams than Celtic, quickly generating a chance for Fabio Quagliarella. Frazier Forester’s save placed the ball in front of goal, allowing Alessandro Matri to put Juventus in front.

The second goal’s one you’ll want to watch a couple of times. Give Andrea Pirlo this much time and he’s going to hurt you, but the man he’s putting on goal with his chip is Arturo Vidal. It’s one of Juventus’s common tactics, to throw one of their central midfielders forward, but the execution is what makes his move successful. Perfect ball, well trapped, touched nicely back across goal at the perfect moment. Quagliarella’s there to pile on.

Of course, Celtic contributed to these goals. Cooper made an error and their midfield gave Pirlo too much time on the ball. But these are mistakes even top teams will occasionally make, errors that often go unpunished.

Not against Juventus. The Old Lady’s not perfect by any means, but in a one-game scenario, that have the type of team, setup, and mentality to exploit the smallest of openings.

They may not be the best team in Europe, but something about them makes you think they could beat anyone.

Never a problem as Juventus knock Celtic out of Champions League

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Neil Lennon knew his team needed a miracle. Coming into today’s match after a 3-0 at Parkhead, the Celtic boss hoped his team could pull off an upset. Maybe a 2-1 or 1-0 win in Turin. You know: Something to be proud of on the long win back to Scotland.

But Celtic were never really that close. Two goals off rebounds gave Juventus a 2-0 victory, sending Italy’s champions through to the Champions League quarterfinals after a 5-0 aggregate result.

The final score may exaggerate the gap between the two teams, particularly after a day when Celtic and Juve played a relatively even match. Of course, a number of teams come out of matches with Juventus feeling they could have done more, but the scoreboard always sets them straight.

Perhaps Wednesday as a good example. Drop in on the match at any given point and the game seemed relatively equal. Juventus’s superior quality was obvious, particularly in midfield, but the disparity wasn’t so great that Celtic couldn’t find a way to break through. One team was obviously better, but 5-0 over two legs better?

But that’s the crux of Juve’s deception. Other teams don’t seem to execute against them when it counts while precise, finite execution from Juventus leaves teams with a series of what ifs. What if we had just stopped them in that one moment.

Wednesday’s first moment came in the 14th minute when Federico Peluso took the ball off Gary Hooper’s feet. The Juve wingback fed Fabio Quagliarella, whose shot was spilled in the box by Frazier Forrester. Alessandro Matri’s clean up act put Juventus up four.

Early in the second half, an exquisite ball over the defense from Andrea Pirlo allowed Arturo Vidal to draw Forester out before putting the ball back across goal for Quagliarella. An open goal allowed the Juve striker to put his team up 5-0.

Celtic had their moments, at one time forcings a lunging save from Gianluigi Buffon to save Hooper’s deflection of a long Kris Commons shot. But the execution just wasn’t there. Juventus converted on two of their three or four moments of brilliant. Celtic never got close.

In the bigger picture, Celtic were never supposed to get this close to begin with. In the face of ever-dwindling Scottish league results in Europe, Celtic were expected to be the next in a line of valiant but lacking SPL champions. Instead, they bested Benfica and Spartak Moscow to make the knockout round, and while they were never close to moving past Juve, they were never as bad as the final score hints. Celtic made a lot of us look stupid.

Because a lot of people will still underestimate Celtic, Juventus’s quality will be dismissed, particularly because it wasn’t accompanied by the kind of smothering dominance we’re seeing from Bayern Munich or Borussia Dortmund. And the quality of their opponent was nowhere near that of Real Madrid’s.

But in the result we see almost a stereotypical Italian trait, the robust quality to match up against anybody. In a one-off, Juventus can match up with the kings of Europe, and before this competition is out, they may prove capable of wearing the crown themselves.

Are they favorites to win Champions League? No, they shouldn’t be. But nobody wants to draw them in the next round.

Offshore Drilling, UEFA Champions League: Juventus 3, at Celtic 0

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An early defensive blunder from center half Efe Ambrose gifted Juventus a third minute lead, leaving Celtic 87 minutes to try and salvage a result in the home leg of their UEFA Champions League Round of 16 matchup. Never able to breach goalkeeper Gianluigi Buffon, Celtic were ultimately handed a humbling 3-0 deficit, with late goals from Claudio Marchisio and Mirko Vucinic putting this tie to rest after only 90 minutes.

Celtic fans may be able to convince themselves they had the better of play for most of the night, but when you give up a goal to Juventus so early in the match, the game’s bound to look lopsided. Particularly in a competition where road goals are so valuable, Juventus is content to sit back and wait for you to over-extend.

After Alessandro Matri’s early goal, that’s exactly what Juve elected to do, a decision that proved prudent as the home side continuously failed to put a credible threat on Buffon. Lacking the ingenuity to match their industry, Celtic allowed Buffon to rack up seven saves without every truly being tested.

(MORE: PSG wins in Spain, loses Zlatan.)

Conversely, Juventus put only four shots on Frazier Forester. Three ended up in the back of his net, the product of a game that was destined to wage Juventus’s counter against Celtic’s creativity. It was never a fair fight.

So the Glaswegians were left to rue their early, match-defining mistake – a long ball out of Juve’s end from Federico Peluso that was misjudged by Ambrose. Forester compounded the mistake by putting himself in no man’s land on the resulting bouncer, with Matri able to get his shot just over the line before Kelvin Wilson could defend the empty net.

In the 77th minute, Matri set up Claudio Marchisio for Juventus’s final goal, his one-touch pass behind a tracking Scott Brown allowing the Italian international to cut back onto his right before doubling Juve’ s lead. Six minutes later, Vucinic capped the lopsided result.

The match was typical Juventus, a team whose success over the last two years has been predicated on taking advantage of others’ mistakes. Their ability to do makes them one of the best teams in Europe and in a different class from Celtic.

The Scottish champions knew about that disparity going into the match, yet their group stage success against Barcelona gave them reason to think their approach could neutralize better sides. On Tuesday, it didn’t come close.

(MORE: Did Ibrahimovic deserve his red card?)

Man of the Match: When you sit on your heels for most of the match, few players get a chance to give Man of the Match-caliber performances, but with some late, confident grabs of Charles Mulgrew and Kris Commons crosses, goalkeeper Gianluigi Buffon proved Juve’s most valuable player. While none of his seven saves were difficult, Buffon did well to prevent opportunities for followup shots. He also made some astute reads on shots that went just wide of goal, giving his team possession instead of conceding dangerous corner kicks.

Threesome of knowledge: What we learned

Somebody needs to ask about Efe Ambrose – It’s too much to say Neil Lennon made a bad choice in going with Ambrose over sliding Charles Mulgrew into central defense (or starting Adam Matthews and moving Mikael Lustig in from right back). Ambrose played in Sunday’s Cup of Nations final. Asking him to report for 90 minutes in Glasgow 48 hours later may have been too much. But we don’t see Mulgrew and Matthews in training, nor do we know how Ambrose felt when he came back. All we can do is ask questions, but it’s possible Lennon deduced a sub-par Ambrose was still his best option.

Matri’s hard work pays off – The third minute confusion wasn’t the only time Alessandro Matri’s willingness to challenge Celtic defenders was a factor. Multiple times in the first half, Matri’s ability to match Ambrose physically allowed Juventus to play long balls out of the back while still challenging for possession. Given how much of the game Juve had given to Celtic (and how deep into their own end that had pushed them), the tactic proved a nice way to relieve pressure. Matri’s goal and assist may overshadow his more subtle efforts, but some of the Juve striker’s best contributions weren’t recorded on the scoresheet.

Celtic couldn’t play their game – In fairness, we don’t know that Celtic were going to approach this game the same way they did Barcelona. Juventus is a completely different team, one that doesn’t need possession to be effective. Yet there was still an assumption that the underlying philosophy would be the same: Defend, take few chances, and wait for opportunities. It’s a lot like Juventus’s approach, and since Celtic made the first mistake, we never got to see if their plan would have worked. It’s difficult to see how a conservative approach would have led to anything but a boring game, but down 1-0 in after three minutes, Celtic had to play into Juventus’s hands.

Packaged for takeaway

  • Because of the way this one played out, we didn’t learn much about Juventus. There are still questions about where, in the European pecking order, we should slot this Juve team, mostly because they didn’t compete in last year’s Champions League. After today’s result, we’re no closer to answers. Early goals make games aberrational.
  • Martin Caceras, in at left-central defender for the injured Giorgio Chiellini, was one of Juventus’s most effective players. Along with Buffon and Matri, he had a Man of the Match claim.
  • Celtic went with a 4-3-3/4-3-2-1 formation that set up Commons, Gary Hooper and James Forrest to press Juve’s back three man-for-man. Unfortunately, because of the early goal, we didn’t get a chance to see how the approach would have worked. Still, it was a minor surprise from a Celtic team many assumed would play closer to a 4-5-1. It also casts doubts on whether Celtic was ever going to be as deferential and defensive as we saw against Barcelona.