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Bruce Arena builds front office staff as Onalfo joins Revolution

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The New England Revolution announced on Sunday that the club hired Curt Onalfo as technical director, with Richie Williams brought on as assistant coach.

Onalfo, a 49-year-old Sao Paulo, Brazil native, has been a coach in the United States since 2000 when he joined D.C. United as an assistant. Since, he has spent time with Sporting Kansas City, the LA Galaxy and the U.S. Youth National Team, leading both MLS clubs for a time and taking charge of the U.S. U-20 and U-23 sides. He will report directly to Bruce Arena, who was named Sporting Director and Head Coach on May 14.

Arena is familiar with Onalfo from his first stint with the USMNT and more recently with the Galaxy, where Onalfo served as an assistant until Arena left to take the USMNT job in late 2016 and Onalfo was named his successor. Most recently, Onalfo was out in Poland with Tab Ramos and the U-20 side at the World Cup.

“I am very pleased to add Curt to our technical staff as we continue to build the soccer organization in New England,” Arena said in the official club release. “Having worked with Curt for many years, I know his vast knowledge and experience in the game will make him an immediate asset to the club.”

Williams, meanwhile, left his job as head coach of USL club Loudoun United FC to take the position with the Revolution. He has previously been with Arena as an assistant with the USMNT during Arena’s second stint and with the New York Red Bulls before that. During his playing days, Williams made 20 appearances for the USMNT and played for Arena with D.C. United and the national team, and even as far back as in college at Virginia, where Arena spent 27 years as head coach.

“Richie and I have a relationship that dates back nearly 30 years, and I have the utmost confidence that he will bring the same energy, enthusiasm, and expertise of the game to the Revolution that he has throughout each stop of his coaching and playing career,” Arena said in the release.

As he plans to rebuild Revs, Arena ‘proud’ of second USMNT stint

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Bruce Arena has accepted the challenge of rebuilding the New England Revolution, though the legendary American coach is still being quizzed about his last gig.

Speaking Thursday after his appointment as Revs boss, Arena was asked about rebounding from the United States men’s national team’s terrible failure to qualify for the 2018 World Cup.

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It was always going to happen, and his quotes were always going to grab headlines. Arena, for his part, did not disappoint.

“I was actually proud of the job I did in 2017,” Arena said. “We had a great group of players and they worked real hard and we fell short. That’s life, unfortunately. Sometimes people don’t understand that. We played 18 games and lost two of them in 2017. Overall, I think it was a positive experience.”

The Yanks lost two of their final four games in the Hex, gaining just four points. The first loss was at home to Costa Rica and the second was to already-eliminated Trinidad and Tobago’s B Team.

“Certainly, I’m as disappointed as anybody in that failure. I don’t define that as my legacy, personally. I know others do. I’m working and trying to be as good as I can be. I’m 67 years old in a country where the president is in his 70s. His likely competition in the next election is 70-something, so I’m the young kid on the block. Did I have to do this? No. But I love coaching, I love the sport, I love the challenge in building the game in this country; it’s something I’ve done for 40 years and it’s not easy to walk away from. It’s something that’s very important for me and that’s why I’m here today.”

So anyway…

New England fired Brad Friedel last week with the club five points outside the playoff picture, and Arena says the team’s goal is to get back into the postseason discussion.

The Revs have allowed the most goals in Major League Soccer this season, and missed the playoffs by nine points last season. Arena will bring league nous to New England, and he does have weapons in the form of Carles Gil and Juan Agudelo, but success will take time and added talent.

He’s Back: Revs hire Bruce Arena as head coach, sporting director

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One of the most decorated coaches in MLS history is back in the league.

The New England Revolution announced that it had hired legendary coach Bruce Arena as its new head coach and sporting director. Terms of the agreement were not disclosed, but Arena is starting as coach with immediate effect. The news of Arena’s appointment came one day after the Revolution announced it was parting ways with general manager Michael Burns, and less than a week since former coach Brad Friedel was let go with a record of 12-21-13.

[READ: PST Writers’ PL Best XI]

Friedel was appointed ahead of the 2018 season with the hopes of turning around a Revolution side that made a deep run in the MLS playoffs in 2014, but had struggled in the years since. However, with a 3-8-2 record this season, Arena will have his hands full in trying to get this squad to improve through the next five months of the season.

“Bruce is one of the most successful coaches in American soccer history, and we feel his commitment to excellence, track record of winning championships in Major League Soccer, as well as his success at the international level, makes him the best person to bring the Revolution back to MLS Cup contention,” Revolution and New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft said in a statement. “We have known Bruce dating back to the advent of MLS, and we have full confidence that he will raise the level of our club to the standard we all expect and demand.”

As most of the world moves to an American sports model, with separate sporting directors/general managers and head coaches working in tandem, it is interesting to see Arena still with the influence and reputational strength to occupy both positions. In the past, Arena and the LA Galaxy’s ownership group with AEG worked in tandem to sign big stars and MLS standouts, and it’s possible that Arena sees that type of relationship happening again.

The move from the Krafts to fire both Burns and Friedel could be a changing of the tides. The Revs, still playing in the cavernous Gillette Stadium, still feel like an MLS 1.0 team, while Atlanta United, the Seattle Sounders, Portland Timbers and Sporting KC, to use a few examples, all feel like they’re living in the 2019 version of the league. To this point, the Revs have just one Designated Player signed, former Aston Villa midfielder Carles Gil, and the team relies quite a bit on once-promising prospects that haven’t really panned out as stars; Teal Bunbury, Juan Agudelo and Scott Caldwell all come to mind.

Is the appointment of Arena a sign that the Kraft family is as ambitious as Arthur Blank or Merrit Paulson? That the Revs will start to spend big to keep up with the giants of MLS? Or is it a big signing in name only, with Arena not receiving the funds and support he was likely promised to take a rebuilding job like this. Only time will tell.

Klinsmann received $3.35M settlement from U.S. Soccer

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CHICAGO (AP) Jurgen Klinsmann received a $3.35 million settlement of his contract with the U.S. Soccer Federation, according to the USSF’s tax filing.

His replacement, Bruce Arena, was given a $300,000 settlement during the fiscal year that ended March 31, 2018, according to the filing, which was released Monday.

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Klinsmann was hired in 2011 and in December 2013 was given a contract extension through December 2018. He was fired in November 2016 after an 0-2 start in the final round of World Cup qualifying in North and Central America and the Caribbean. His contract was settled for $3,354,167, the tax filing said.

Arena earned $899,348 in base pay during the fiscal year and a $50,000 bonus, according to the filing, which was first reported by The Washington Post. He quit after the U.S. loss at Trinidad and Tobago in October 2017 that ended the Americans’ streak of seven straight World Cup appearances.

Dave Sarachan, Arena’s top assistant, was the interim coach from October 2017 through last November. He had a base salary of $223,656 during the fiscal year.

Klinsmann’s top assistant, Andri Herzog, was given a settlement of $355,537 during the fiscal year. He is now Israel’s national team coach.

U.S. women’s coach Jill Ellis earned $291,029 in base pay during the fiscal year, which did not include a major tournament. He compensation was topped by under-20 men’s coach Tab Ramos, who had $295,558 in base pay plus a $30,000 bonus.

USSF CEO Dan Flynn, who has said he may be retiring, had $684,617 in base pay and $130,000 in bonuses. Chief operating officer Jay Berhalter, brother of new U.S. coach Gregg Berhalter, had $466,195 in base pay and $115,563 in bonuses.

More AP soccer: https://apnews.com/apf-Soccer and https://twitter.com/AP-Sports

Geoff Cameron, Bruce Arena with dueling USMNT comments

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While Stoke City was sorting out who’d be coming to town on transfer Deadline Day, one of its players was on the offensive regarding the most infamous night in his national team’s history.

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Geoff Cameron spared no blushes in a feature piece by the New York Time’s Marc Stein that was released Wednesday and details his career and the United States men’s national team’s dismissal from World Cup qualifying with the accomplished 32-year-old on the bench.

“There’s no doubt in my mind that, if Jurgen Klinsmann was still our head coach, we would have qualified for the World Cup. … I’m convinced if they would have kept Jurgen and not done such a drastic change, I think we would have qualified. I know we would have qualified. Instead we’ve gone backward.”

(Me, too, Geoff. Me, too, but that’s also because a coach and players would have to almost purposely screw up the Hex to miss out. Bruce Arena sure played his part).

Cameron said Arena told him before the United States’ last two matches of the Hex that he would not be starting the matches because of fitness concerns. Cameron was perplexed; He had just played 90 minutes for Stoke in the Premier League.

“But I would have more respect for a coach to say: ‘You know what, Geoff? I don’t fancy you today. I think this is a better lineup.’ I’d say: ‘O.K., no problem, you told me the truth.’ But if you tell me I’m not fit enough, that’s like an insult to me as a professional.”

Stein, being the fine reporter that he is, got Arena’s response to Cameron’s shots. Arena continued to display that he is not good at the quotes and stuff.

“Could Geoff have been in the starting lineup that day? Yes. But the problem with Geoff throughout 2017, at club and national-team level, was inconsistency and some injuries. … Geoff started five games starting in November 2016 through October 2017. Our record was 1-3-1 — that plays a role. I don’t think 2017 was that impressive of a performance for the player. When the stars and the moon and the sun are aligned properly, Geoff is a very good player. They don’t all align properly all the time.”

That’s a striking bit of ego, even for Arena. The “stars and moon and sun” line is a stunning bit of disrespect for a 55-times capped player with 163 Premier League matches under his belt.

More importantly, it’s wrong. The Yanks won two (Honduras home and T&T), drew two (Honduras and Mexico away), and lost to Costa Rica. That’s one loss in five. And going with the 1-3-1 when Arena’s entire career has been spent in a league that puts losses second seems worse (though we may be reading too far into it).